Master of Business Administration (MBA) - Part-Time Program

Overview

The mission of the George Fox Master of Business Administration (MBA) program is to prepare trusted leaders who will transform business through academic, professional and spiritual preparation that enables students to think with clarity, act with integrity and serve with passion. The purpose of the Master of Business Administration (MBA) program is to enable graduates to be professionally competent, ethically grounded, globally engaged, socially responsible and servant leaders.

The part-time MBA program is designed for managers and leaders in the private, public and not-for-profit sectors in any industry or field. The program is designed to enhance management and leadership abilities through intellectual, moral and creative growth through an academic experience that is global, relevant and life-changing. In addition to a rigorous curriculum focused on academic excellence, the program draws on student experiences for shared learning opportunities and application.

Program Objectives

To enable students to:

  • Integrate knowledge and decision making within the larger framework of the organization and social and cultural contexts
  • Critically analyze organizational, management and leadership problems creatively and substantively to apply innovative solutions
  • Evaluate external and internal drivers of change in order to manage organizational change effectively
  • Enhance leadership, management and interpersonal skills
  • Effectively communicate in organizational settings through written and oral presentations
  • Evaluate one’s own values and the role that integrity, compassion, accountability, ethics and servant leadership may play in leadership practice
  • Synthesize professional competence across the major functional areas of an organization with a global perspective
  • Increase capacity for conceptualization, strategic thinking, and problem solving

Admission Requirements

Applicants seeking admission to the MBA program must hold a four-year baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or university, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the final two years (60 semester hours) of course work. In addition, applicants must complete the following to be considered for admission to the program:

  • Master of business administration application and application fee
  • Submit one official transcript from each college/university attended
  • Verification of five years of full-time professional work experience
  • Three letters of recommendation
  • A two- to three-page admission essay
  • Current resumé
  • Group interview
  • Complete and pass a financial e-learning course

Students whose GPA from the final two years of course work does not reflect their aptitude for graduate work may choose to submit a GMAT test score for consideration in the admission process. The department may consider applicants who show significant promise but do not specifically meet all of these criteria.

Transfer Credit

Transfer of up to 9 hours credit is allowed toward the MBA program from an MBA program at an accredited graduate school. Consult the registrar's office for information on eligibility of transfer credit.  Transferability of credits earned at this institution and transferred to another is at the discretion of the receiving institution.

Residence Requirements

A minimum of 33 of the 42 hours required for the MBA program must be taken in resident study at George Fox University.

Course Requirements

The Master of Business Administration program is generally two years in length with 42 semester hours of coursework required as a minimum for graduation. All program hours are in prescribed business courses.

Other Requirements

Students are expected to maintain continuous enrollment in the program, remaining with their cohort throughout, so personal and work commitments should be planned accordingly. The program is generally structured on a cohort model, in which a group of students follows an integrated sequence of courses from beginning to end. The program requires 26 months to complete. Reinstatement to the program after withdrawal requires Admissions Committee action and may subject the student to additional requirements for the degree.

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate with the master of business administration degree students must:
  • Students must complete at least 42 semester hours of course work with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above.
  • Achieve a grade of C in no more than 6 credit hours of the program curriculum. If a grade lower than C is received in a course, that course must be retaken (for more specific information, please refer to the student handbook). C+ grades are allowed to the extent that cumulative GPA remains above a 3.0.

Curriculum Plan

Complete the following:
This course explores both theory and application of competencies that contribute to effectiveness in an organizational setting at the individual, team and organizational level. This is the introductory course to the George Fox University MBA Program. It is intended to demonstrate the unique and distinctive ethos of the university.  The approach features readings, case studies, class discussion and interaction, and written material and oral presentations.
This course explores how organizations are formed, managed and led in an environment that is increasingly global, diverse, and unpredictable. We probe the nature of organizations, their behavior, their culture, how they change, and the human impact of those changes. Students will conduct a criteria-based examination of a specific organization, exploring the question, "What is a world-class organization?" We will also investigate proven approaches for managing change and transition in organizations.
This course examines the fundamental accounting principles underlying the balance sheet, income statement, statement of stockholders' equity and statement of cash flows. An emphasis is placed on financial analysis as a basis for operational and financial decision making within various companies and industries. Key internal accounting and operating controls are identified as a basis for the processing of critical business and transactional information through the accounting and operating systems of an organization.
This course focuses on the economic operating environment and examines the underlying assumptions, concepts and methods of microeconomics and macroeconomics, with emphasis placed on the application of economics to managerial decision-making. Competing economic theories and the role of economic institutions will be investigated. This course is also intended to raise economic awareness in business leaders to enhance responsible and ethical engagement with the economy. Prerequisite: This course is for part-time MBA students.
This course examines the core issues of marketing management including the marketing planning process, promotion, pricing, sales and distribution and product strategy. The role of market research and market intelligence will be examined. Specific topics include understanding the consumer, brand management, selection of target markets, and marketing mix decisions.
This course covers the fundamental concepts, techniques, and practices of managerial finance. It is designed to help students develop the critical thinking and quantitative skills they need in financial decision-making processes. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, time value of money, stock and bond valuation, capital budgeting, risk and return trade-off, CAPM, financial derivatives, business valuation, efficient markets, portfolio theory and working capital management.
This course introduces practical ethical issues that arise in the work environment and the ethical tools to understand and inform day-to-day activities in the workplace. This course focuses on building understanding of ethical issues inherent in dealing with the structure of legal systems, business litigation, contracts, employment issues, intellectual property, competition and sales, and international law. The course will help students develop the ability to anticipate and recognize key legal issues for ethical decision making. Christian values run throughout the course and are covered specifically in several topics. Prerequisite: This course is for students in MBA Part-time program.
This course focuses on developing understanding of operations management and global supply management from a general management perspective, particularly as these functions influence a firm’s performance. Topics include process analysis and design; capacity and utilization; manufacturing and service process performance; supply chain management, including inventory management, warehousing, sourcing, downstream and upstream issues and the role of information technology; continuous improvement and quality, including Lean and Six Sigma concepts. The course integrates both qualitative and quantitative concepts.
This course explores both historical and contemporary leadership theories and models. Particular emphasis is given to evaluating leadership theories from a values perspective and determining the ways in which they can be applied to the most current developments in organizational change strategies. Using this knowledge, students are presented with ways in which leadership can be conceptualized and applied to meet the requirements of today's increasingly complex organizations. Prerequisite: This course is for students in MBA Part-time program.
This course examines the strategy process, including planning and implementation, for effectively building sustainable competitive advantage in an organization. Topics considered are building effective planning processes; assessing internal, external and competitive environments; linking corporate mission and values with goals and strategic directions; emergent vs. deliberate strategic directions and opportunities; evaluating the impact of global considerations, such as geographic expansion, emerging economies, and the role of culture on strategy formation; and leading strategic change.
Choose one of the following:
As world citizens we are increasingly aware of the globalization of markets, economies, strategies and structures in our world. This survey class offers a brief overview of the issues encountered in globalization with a concentration on understanding the nature of international business, and the development of cultural awareness. Students will understand the differences in types of organizations and the role of government and society, and be able to identify key issues to be resolved in internationalizing, recognizing both positive and negative impacts of globalization. Prerequisite: This course is for students in MBA Part-time program.
As world citizens we are increasingly aware of the globalization of markets, economies, strategies and structures in our world. This class offers a survey of the issues encountered through preparation and travel to an international destination to witness its business and culture firsthand. Students will understand the differences in types of organizations, the role of government and society, and be able to identify key issues to be resolved in internationalizing, recognizing both positive and negative impacts of globalization. Prerequisite: This course is for students in MBA Part-time program.
Complete the following:
Six elective courses required- one credit course per semester for a total of 6 hours (choose from multiple topics each semester).
Elective courses explore various topics each semester that are complementary to the core curriculum of the MBA program.
Elective courses explore various topics each semester that are complementary to the core curriculum of the MBA program.
Elective courses explore various topics each semester that are complementary to the core curriculum of the MBA program.
Elective courses explore various topics each semester that are complementary to the core curriculum of the MBA program.
Elective courses explore various topics each semester that are complementary to the core curriculum of the MBA program.
Elective courses explore various topics each semester that are complementary to the core curriculum of the MBA program.

Concentration Options

Choose one of the following:

Complete the following:
This course examines the fundamentals of the sources of finance, debt and equity, and the uses of that finance to manage growth. Optimal capital structures will be explored from the standpoint of the operational and financial condition of various businesses and capital budgeting needs. More sophisticated financial topics such as leverage recapitalizations, weighted average cost of capital for debt and equity, and fair market value techniques for business valuation will be covered.
This course examines the fundamentals of commercial banking in the capital markets from a financial management perspective. Emphasis will be placed on an analysis of investment characteristics, systematic risk, valuation, diversification, and the market price behavior of debt, equity, and derivative securities. Potential sources and uses of firm financing will be examined along with the determination of the appropriate financial structure and related risks. Portfolio theory, the insights and limitations of capital asset pricing model and passive versus active investing will be explored.
This course takes the student through the life cycle of a start-up as seen by the entrepreneur responsible for its finance. The course examines innovation as the foundation for a financially successful venture. With the capitalization table as one important point of reference, the course examines rounds of financing by angel investors, venture capitalists and finally by corporate and institutional investors in an exit round. Milestones of start-up to corporate achievement, and the strategic focus and coherence required for those milestones, are examined in integrative case studies.
Complete the following:
This course focuses on the strategic considerations of global business engagement. The necessary organization-wide adaptations required to be an effective, efficient and successful global player will be explored. The implications for choices involving markets, products and sourcing will be examined, as will the importance of understanding global differences in government relationships, market systems and cultures. Topics include globalization and the impact on the global business environment; leveraging international resources and capabilities; understanding global institutions and cultural differences for effective strategic planning and action; entering foreign markets and managing global competitive dynamics; issues concerning global governance and corporate social responsibility.
This course will focus on the development of corporate strategy with implementation strategies at the functional levels of finance, operations, manufacturing, service delivery, marketing, sales and other relevant functions. Leadership and management philosophies and practices important in strategic planning will be considered as a critical component of implementation and strategic action. Topics include implementing strategic initiatives across multiple divisions of an organization; corporate and functional competitive dynamics; leading strategic change and change management, including stakeholder engagement, during strategic implementation; the critical importance of effective communication during strategic implementation; and measuring the success of strategic implementation.
This course will focus on current topics that may influence strategic formulation and implementation. Topics may include triple bottom line strategic approaches; the strategic impact of corporate social responsibility initiatives in environmental and social sustainability; the impact and strategic considerations of changes in financial and regulatory issues; corporate governance; fraud and legal misrepresentation; crisis management; strategic considerations of fundraising choices and/or changing the shareholder base (e.g. from private to public share basis); the role of innovation; and globalization and changes in the global business climate.
Complete the following:
This course examines the role and function HR Management and its strategic value to organizations. Specifically, learning will focus on HRM philosophies, advanced topics in employment law, labor and employee relations, employee experience, total rewards, managing risk, and HR implications of globalization.
This course emphasizes the strategic role of human resource management and the strategic responsibility of the HR practitioner. Key areas of influence explored include, but are not limited to, recruitment and selection, workforce planning, talent management, corporate social responsibility, HR information systems and analytics.
HR is a critical component in developing a high performance organization. This course focuses on training and developing, large-scale change (including mergers and acquisitions), performance management and measuring HR outcomes.
Choose three of the following:
This course examines the fundamentals of the sources of finance, debt and equity, and the uses of that finance to manage growth. Optimal capital structures will be explored from the standpoint of the operational and financial condition of various businesses and capital budgeting needs. More sophisticated financial topics such as leverage recapitalizations, weighted average cost of capital for debt and equity, and fair market value techniques for business valuation will be covered.
This course examines the fundamentals of commercial banking in the capital markets from a financial management perspective. Emphasis will be placed on an analysis of investment characteristics, systematic risk, valuation, diversification, and the market price behavior of debt, equity, and derivative securities. Potential sources and uses of firm financing will be examined along with the determination of the appropriate financial structure and related risks. Portfolio theory, the insights and limitations of capital asset pricing model and passive versus active investing will be explored.
This course takes the student through the life cycle of a start-up as seen by the entrepreneur responsible for its finance. The course examines innovation as the foundation for a financially successful venture. With the capitalization table as one important point of reference, the course examines rounds of financing by angel investors, venture capitalists and finally by corporate and institutional investors in an exit round. Milestones of start-up to corporate achievement, and the strategic focus and coherence required for those milestones, are examined in integrative case studies.
This course focuses on the strategic considerations of global business engagement. The necessary organization-wide adaptations required to be an effective, efficient and successful global player will be explored. The implications for choices involving markets, products and sourcing will be examined, as will the importance of understanding global differences in government relationships, market systems and cultures. Topics include globalization and the impact on the global business environment; leveraging international resources and capabilities; understanding global institutions and cultural differences for effective strategic planning and action; entering foreign markets and managing global competitive dynamics; issues concerning global governance and corporate social responsibility.
This course will focus on the development of corporate strategy with implementation strategies at the functional levels of finance, operations, manufacturing, service delivery, marketing, sales and other relevant functions. Leadership and management philosophies and practices important in strategic planning will be considered as a critical component of implementation and strategic action. Topics include implementing strategic initiatives across multiple divisions of an organization; corporate and functional competitive dynamics; leading strategic change and change management, including stakeholder engagement, during strategic implementation; the critical importance of effective communication during strategic implementation; and measuring the success of strategic implementation.
This course will focus on current topics that may influence strategic formulation and implementation. Topics may include triple bottom line strategic approaches; the strategic impact of corporate social responsibility initiatives in environmental and social sustainability; the impact and strategic considerations of changes in financial and regulatory issues; corporate governance; fraud and legal misrepresentation; crisis management; strategic considerations of fundraising choices and/or changing the shareholder base (e.g. from private to public share basis); the role of innovation; and globalization and changes in the global business climate.
This course examines the role and function HR Management and its strategic value to organizations. Specifically, learning will focus on HRM philosophies, advanced topics in employment law, labor and employee relations, employee experience, total rewards, managing risk, and HR implications of globalization.
This course emphasizes the strategic role of human resource management and the strategic responsibility of the HR practitioner. Key areas of influence explored include, but are not limited to, recruitment and selection, workforce planning, talent management, corporate social responsibility, HR information systems and analytics.
HR is a critical component in developing a high performance organization. This course focuses on training and developing, large-scale change (including mergers and acquisitions), performance management and measuring HR outcomes.