BIST (Biblical Studies)

BIST (Biblical Studies)

BIST 505 Biblical Book Study in English
3 hours. This course studies the text of a biblical book based on the English text and will apply interpretive principles learned in courses such as BIST 506 Old Testament I (Torah and Former Prophets), BIST 507 Old Testament II (Latter Prophets and Writings), BIST 508 New Testament I (Gospels and Acts), BIST 509 New Testament II (Romans-Revelation), and BIST 543 Biblical Exegesis and Hermeneutics. It may be taught in conjunction with BIST 515 Old Testament Book Study in Hebrew or BIST 525 New Testament Book Study in Greek. BIST 505 must be chosen by students who have not yet completed the second semester of the pertinent biblical language. BIST 505 may be taken more than once, as long as a biblical book is not repeated.

BIST 506 Old Testament I (Torah and Former Prophets)
3 hours. This course begins with an introduction to the inductive method of Bible study, using the book of Amos as a laboratory. Then, it moves to a survey of the content and message of the Torah and the Former Prophets (Joshua to 2 Kings). We deal with introductory matters (e.g., authorship, dating, occasion, unity) as well as issues of purpose and theology. BIST 506 is a prerequisite for BIST 507 Old Testament II (Latter Prophets and Writings).

BIST 507 Old Testament II (Latter Prophets and Writings)
3 hours. This course continues the study of the Old Testament, moving into a study of the Latter Prophets and the Writings. We introduce and discuss advanced issues in exegetical method and provide an introduction to the modern history of the interpretation of the Old Testament.
Prerequisite: BIST 506 Old Testament I (Torah and Former Prophets).

BIST 508 New Testament I (Gospels and Acts)
3 hours. This course familiarizes students with the content and structure, distinctive theology, and introductory matters (e.g., date, authorship, occasion) of the four New Testament Gospels and the book of Acts. Attention will be given to methods of interpretation of these texts, and use will be made of a synopsis of the Gospels. Together with BIST 509 New Testament II (Romans - Revelation), the course provides students with a solid grasp of the New Testament canon, with particular attention given to its use in ministry. (BIST 008/508 and BIST 009/509 New Testament II (Romans - Revelation) need not be taken sequentially.)

BIST 509 New Testament II (Romans - Revelation)
3 hours. This course familiarizes students with the content, structure, theology, and introductory matters (e.g., date, authorship, genre) related to Romans through Revelation. Attention will be given to the social-historical setting of early Christianity and its usefulness in understanding these texts. Together with New Testament I (Gospels and Acts), the course provides students with a solid grasp of the New Testament canon, with particular attention given to its use in ministry. (BIST 008/508 New Testament I (Gospels and Acts) and BIST 009/509 need not be taken sequentially.)

BIST 511 Introducing Biblical Hebrew
3 hours. The first course in the Hebrew language sequence, this course begins with the study of the Hebrew alphabet and vowel points and moves on to study the structure of the Hebrew noun and verb systems and syntactical features. Hebrew language and exegetical tools in both hard-copy and electronic formats are introduced.

BIST 512 Interpreting the Hebrew Testament
3 hours. The second course in the Hebrew language sequence, this class completes a basic study of Hebrew morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. Students gain facility in reading basic and advanced narrative and elementary poetry. Exegesis in the original language is explored. Students also are introduced to advanced original-language computer tools for Bible research and their use.
Prerequisite: BIST 511 Introducing Biblical Hebrew.

BIST 515 Old Testament Book Study in Hebrew
3 hours. Hebrew text book studies apply principles of hermeneutics and exegesis to original Hebrew texts.
Prerequisite: BIST 512 Interpreting the Hebrew Testament.

BIST 521 Introducing New Testament Greek
3 hours. An introduction to New Testament Greek in which the student is exposed to the basic principles of New Testament Greek grammar, syntax, and exegesis, to the Greek text of the New Testament, and to the major tools used in its study. While the basics of Greek have to be the center of focus in this introductory course, attention also is given to the Greek text of the New Testament.

BIST 522 Interpreting the Greek Testament
3 hours. This continuation of BIST 521 adds to the student's knowledge and understanding of New Testament Greek through further exposure to the Greek text of the New Testament. While it pays close attention to matters of grammar, the central focus is the text itself, its interpretation, and its use.
Prerequisite: BIST 521 Introducing New Testament Greek.

BIST 525 New Testament Book Study in Greek
3 hours. Greek text book studies apply principles of hermeneutics and exegesis to original Greek texts.
Prerequisite: BIST 522 Interpreting the Greek Testament or its equivalent.

BIST 531 Theological German I
1 hour. This course teaches the basic grammar and vocabulary needed in order to begin translating German theological texts. Those desiring facility in German translation should take German II in the Spring semester as well. These two courses (Theological German I and II)  are designed to fulfill German language entry requirements for most PhD programs in theology.

BIST 532 Theological German II
1 hour. This course will improve facility in translating German theological texts. Some attention will be given to issues of grammar and syntax particularly helpful in reading theological German. Students who pass this course should be able to sustain German entrance exams for PhD programs in theological disciplines. Pre-requisite: Theological German I or its equivalent.

BIST 535 Hebrew Readings
1 hour. We will read through selections of the Hebrew text as time allows, as well as improve command of basic Hebrew vocabulary and of Hebrew grammar and syntax. The course will aid the student to improve facility in reading OT Hebrew; gain familiarity with the Hebrew text; increase memorized vocabulary; and solidify and advance grasp of Hebrew grammar and syntax. May be repeated for credit, as long as a biblical book is not repeated.

BIST 542 Biblical Theology
3 hours. This course explores the message and theology of important texts, blocks of texts, books, and corpora in the Bible. Students gain greater skill in advanced Bible-study method. We also deal with relating the theology of the Bible to contemporary issues.

BIST 543 Biblical Exegesis and Hermeneutics
3 hours. This course familiarizes students with tools and methods for interpreting biblical texts and provides the foundation for a lifelong, careful study of the Bible. A comprehensive methodology will be learned and applied to different genres of literature, e.g., historical narrative, psalms, epistles, and apocalyptic. Since exegesis is an "art" that can be learned only by practice, class emphasis will be on "doing" exegesis; i.e., the class will take on a "workshop" format. In the process, the student will gain facility with lexica, concordances, grammars, theological and exegetical dictionaries, and other exegetical aids.

BIST 545 Greek Readings
1 hour. We will read through as much of a New Testament Greek text as time allows, as well as improve command of basic Greek vocabulary and of Greek grammar and syntax. The course will aid the student to improve facility in reading NT Greek; gain familiarity with a Greek text; increase memorized vocabulary; and solidify and advance grasp of Greek grammar and syntax. May be repeated for credit, as long as a biblical book is not repeated.

BIST 550 The Old Testament and the Ancient Near East
3 hours. This course explores the relationship of the Bible to the ancient Near-Eastern world. Beginning with an introduction to archaeological method, the course moves into a study of extant sources from the ancient Near East and attempts to get a feel for the social, political, religious, and "philosophical" dynamics at work in that world and how they illumine various biblical passages. Students are encouraged to take BIST 506 Old Testament I and BIST 507 Old Testament II prior to registering for BIST 550.

BIST 551 The Old Testament, Early Judaism, and Christianity
3 hours. This course explores the historical and literary developments in the period of Second-Temple Judaism and on into the early centuries after Christ. This gives opportunity to trace the path and development of theological ideas from Old Testament to New Testament, as well as the New Testament's use of the Old Testament. Students are encouraged to take BIST 506 Old Testament I and BIST 508 New Testament I or BIST 509 New Testament II prior to registering for BIST 551.

BIST 560 Christology of the New Testament
3 hours. A theological study of the presentation of the person and work of Christ in the various books of the New Testament. Special emphasis is given to the Gospels, the Pauline writings, and contemporary scholarship. Students are encouraged to take BIST 508 New Testament I (Gospels and Acts) or BIST 509 New Testament II (Romans-Revelation) prior to this course.

BIST 561 Paul and the Law
3 hours. This course will seek to understand Paul and his letters by focusing on the topic of Paul and the law. The issues surrounding Paul and his understanding of the law impact how believers are expected to live in relation to the Old Testament law (is the law still required?), how grace and moral responsibility are to be balanced in the Christian life, and how we understand salvation in relation to other religious traditions (especially Jewish-Christian relations). Attention will be given to the so-called "new perspective on Paul." Students will (1) read the major contributors on this issue, including traditional and newer approaches; (2) study key New Testament texts (Galatians; 2 Corinthians 3; Philippians 3; Romans 1-11); and (3) analyze the impact of Paul's view of the law for church ministry and theology. Students are encouraged to take BIST 509 New Testament II (Romans-Revelation) prior to this course.

BIST 565 Internship
3 hours. The seminary provides some opportunities and has also cooperated with local universities to provide internship experience under the supervision of qualified professors. The internship requires a minimum of 120 hours serving the selected teaching site and attendance at three classes, usually held on selected Saturdays. Reflection papers, regular meetings with the ministry supervisor and the internship director, and assigned readings are also required. Students are expected to secure their own teaching site and supervisor, which must be approved by the faculty internship director. Students should take the teaching internship course during the last half of their program.

BIST 571 (first semester) Research/Thesis in Biblical Studies
3 hours. See requirements outlined in Master of Arts in Theological Studies.

BIST 571 (first semester) Research/Thesis in Biblical Studies
3 hours. See requirements outlined in Master of Arts in Theological Studies.

BIST 572 (second semester) Research/Thesis in Biblical Studies
3 hours. See requirements outlined in Master of Arts in Theological Studies.

BIST 573 Master's Summative Project
3 hours. See requirements outlined in Master of Arts in Theological Studies.

BIST 575 Thesis/Project Continuation
1 hour. Required for third and subsequent semesters of thesis research and writing or second and subsequent semesters of Summative Project work.

BIST 585 Seminar in Biblical Studies
1 to 3 hours. A seminar represents the involvement of a group of students with a professor studying a specially selected topic. Students are encouraged to submit suggestions for seminar topics to the departmental chair. Such requests, as well as faculty interests and special opportunities, will be considered in arrangements for a seminar.

BIST 595 Special Study in Biblical Studies
1 to 3 hours. An individualized course of research, involving in-depth study of a particular question, problem, or issue. The student must make application for the study prior to registration for the semester in which the study will be carried out. The application must be approved by the faculty member overseeing the study and the department chair.

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