CHTH (Christian History and Theology)

CHTH (Christian History and Theology)

CHTH 507 Historical Theology: Early Church through Reformation
3 hours. Covers the development of Christianity and Christian theology from the end of the apostolic period through the 16th century. Examines the expansion of the Church, the evolvement of Christian institutions and practice, the conflicts that confronted the Church from within and without, the reform of the Church, and the theological development of doctrines such as the soteriology, Trinity, Christology, grace and free will, and theology of the cross.

CHTH 508 Essentials in Christian Theology
3 hours.  This course takes a constructive theological approach, integrating Christian doctrine and contemporary theologies in the church. It builds upon the student’s engagement with historical development of theology, focusing on the Trinity and key considerations in atonement and pneumatology. The principal goal is to reflect upon the normative sources for theology, with a view toward equipping students to engage their own denomination's theological development.

CHTH 509 History of Christianity in America
3 hours. This course examines how Christianity developed in North America from the 15th to the 21st centuries. Special attention will be paid to the role evangelicalism in American churches, the creative ways that Americans contextualize Christianity, and the contributions that American religious innovators make to global theological conversations.

CHTH 510 World Religion and Christian Thought
3 hours.  An introduction to the origins, histories, myths, and basic tenets of other religious traditions in the world and how Christians might engage them in meaningful interaction. Involving a research project and on site visits, a concerted effort will be made to show the common humanity of the people who follow other religions. Co-learners will guard against viewing people from other religions as the "excluded other” by understanding commonalities and celebrating differences.

CHTH 511 History of Christianity I
3 hours. This course will examine the history of Christianity up until close to the present time. It will look at traditional historical accounts critically in order to look beyond a perspective that marries the church and its outreach with colonial expansion. The place, treatment and mistreatment of peoples– including Indigenous peoples- will be examined in detail. This course is for students in the MAIS degree.

CHTH 512 History of Christianity II
3 hours. Continuing on from Church History I, this course will examine ways in which the Indigenous church has been planted and has grown within North American and other Indigenous contexts. Special emphasis will be given to its growth and development through the various attempts in its history to contextualize or indigenize Christianity. This course is for students in the MAIS degree.

CHTH 513 North American Church History
3 hours. Covers the development of Christianity in the United States from its early Colonial beginnings up to the present. Gives special attention to the development of denominations, trends in theological thought, significant church leaders, and the place of the church in contemporary culture. This course is for students in the MAIS degree.

CHTH 528 Intercultural Studies I: Cultural Anthropology for a Postmodern World
2 hours. Course studies the variety of human culture through the discipline of anthropology and indigenous scholars. Students engage perspectives from both non-indigenous anthropology and the indigenous community, particularly within the Indigenous North American context, and explore its relationship to today’s world. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 528 and CHTH 529.)

CHTH 529 Intercultural Studies II: Indigenous Peoples and the North American Church
2 hours. Course provides an examination of the history of Christian mission among Indigenous peoples, current Indigenous life, and Indigenous spiritualities in geographic, regionally specific studies that connect to both global issues and local context. Students explore issues such as the harmony ethic, building a theology of the land, and various indigenous religious practices in relation to the Christian faith. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 528 and CHTH 529.)

CHTH 530 Gender and Christian Thought
2 hours. This course examines the status, roles, and contributions of women and men as they pertain to gender in the history of Christianity and explores the biblical and theological basis for gender equality. Investigating the effects of gender theory in culture and Christian thought, discussion will be aimed toward practical considerations for the flourishing of women and men in the church today.

CHTH 533 Christian Ethics
2 hours. An exploration of the guiding assumptions and frameworks undergirding various ethical positions and their claims, especially in relationship to Christian theology. The course also analyzes the relationship between context and ethics, specifically as it pertains to the church and its role in the formation of Christian ethics. Implications for the practice of ethics in personal, social, economic, and political problems of our contemporary world will be examined and evaluated.

CHTH 534 Povery and Restorative Ecojustice
2 hours.  Explores the integral relationships between ecotheology and global systems of oppression. Students will both engage intersectionality through the lens of environmental degradation and take intentional action out of hope for restoration in the Creation. Students will study current issues such as toxicity, population growth, and an activism rooted in solidarity.

CHTH 537 The Postcolonial Church
2 hours.  Explores both historical and current manifestations of colonialism as a preparation for holistic, shalom-based, postcolonial Christianity and mission, noting those theologians and movements who understood their faith in juxtaposition to Empire, including Jesus himself. The course will pay special attention to North America's colonial imprint and current postcolonial theologies.

CHTH 546 Ecotheology I: Theology and Stewardship of Creation
2 hours. This course wrestles with Old Testament theologies of Creation, earthkeeping, and the role of humanity in the created order. Students will engage the history and development of these ideas within the Church, and consider how this legacy relates to the current state of the world. Students will explore the diverse issues corresponding to Sabbath and will engage in ecopraxis involving Sabbathkeeping. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 546 and CHTH 547.)

CHTH 547 Ecotheology II: Hope and New Creation
2 hours. Explores ecotheology through the lens of the New Testament. Students will analyze how the doctrines of Trinity, pneumatology, and soteriology relate to the current state of the world. Students will also investigate the ecological issues of food, water, and waste and will engage in ecopraxis related to those issues. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 546 and CHTH 547.)

CHTH 548 Ecopraxis I: Keeping the Garden
2 hours. Immerses student in an experience of the natural world during an extended retreat. Students will reflect on the wonder of Creation and the immanence of God. They will engage such issues as climate change, agrarianism, and the relationship between science and faith. Students will have the opportunity to explore practical ways to build simple living into their daily lives. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 548 and CHTH 549.)

CHTH 549 Ecopraxis II: Greening the Church
2 hours. Course builds on Keeping the Garden by exploring how faith communities can "green" their local worship and ministry. Students will investigate "green teams," community gardens, educational programs, and advocacy for God's Creation. They will continue to have the opportunity to explore practical ways to build simple living into their lives and their faith communities. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 548 and CHTH 549.)

CHTH 550 Indigenous Studies I: Indigenous Spiritualities
2 hours. An examination of Indigenous spiritualities from a Christian perspective and its relationship to Americans from every culture. Students will be exposed to the spirituality of America’s First Nations and others through readings, shared experiences, and various media. The values associated with the Indigenous American harmony concept will be explored along with an understanding of Indigenous American theologies of the land. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 550 and CHTH 551.)

CHTH 551 Indigenous Studies II: Theology and Place
2 hours. Immerses students in the natural world during a five-day retreat. Students will abide in Creation and experience the beauty and hope of our immanent God. They will consider Shalom and Indigenous understandings of the land and the relationship between science and faith. They will engage current issues such as agriculture, conservation, land use, and consumption of natural resources. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 550 and CHTH 551.)

CHTH 552 Theology I: Introduction
3 hours. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the tasks and tools of Christian theology, including the development of a common theological vocabulary, so as to understand the nature of Christian faith and acquire the capacity to converse with others in shared terms. An introduction to Indigenous theological terminology will be introduced in the latter part of the course as a bridge to Theol. II. This course is for students in the MAIS degree.

CHTH 553 Theology II: Theology and Ethic of the Land
3 hours. During this course students will be immersed in the wider creation in a retreat context with reading prior to and following the retreat. The experience of the beauty and hope of God as immanent within creation will be considered through Indigenous understandings of the land, and the relationship between science and faith. Students will engage current issues such as agriculture, conservation, land use and consumption of natural resources, gaining an understanding of the dual expressions of Indigenous and Hebrew constructs of shalom, through which God blesses creation.  This course is for students in the MAIS degree.

CHTH 554 Colonization and Decolonization
3 hours.  This course will consider the critiques made by indigenous and postcolonial scholars of the methodological approaches used in the humanities and social sciences for their complicity in colonialism. It will examine various attempts to decolonize methodology and to construct indigenous and postcolonial methodological approaches to society and community. Students will work to develop their own philosophical and methodological approaches to decolonization. This course is for students in the MAIS degree.

CHTH 555 Seminar in Christian History and Theology I
2 hours. A small group of students study a specially selected topic with a professor. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 555 and CHTH 565.)

CHTH 557 Theology and Praxis of Pedagogy
3 hours. Whereas pedagogy invites the adult to enter the child's world for the child's learning, andragogy acknowledges that a student gains skill, knowledge, and wisdom in a trajectory that leads them from a less mature to a more mature understanding of a given subject. Andragogy therefore uses different methods and different focuses for learning. This course will introduce the student to andragogical method in theology. This course is for students in the MAIS degree.

CHTH 558 Quaker Studies I: Christian Practices of the Quaker Movement
2 hours. Offers a detailed look of Christian practices in the Quaker movement. It focuses on the intersection of Quaker spirituality and praxis, and the influence Quakers have in the world today. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 558 and CHTH 559.)

CHTH 559 Quaker Studies II: Christian Practices of the Quaker Movement
2 hours. Offers a detailed look of Christian practices in the Quaker movement. It focuses on the intersection of Quaker spirituality and praxis, and the influence Quakers have in the world today. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 558 and CHTH 559.)

CHTH 560 Wesleyan Studies I: Theology and Context of John Wesley
2 hours. An exploration of the life and theology of John Wesley through essential primary and secondary sources. The course gives partiuclar attention to Wesley's eighteenth century context and his role in the development of early Methodism. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 560 and CHTH 561.)

CHTH 561 Wesleyan Studies II: The Wesleyan-Holiness Movement
2 hours. Explores the influence of John and Charles Wesley and the Methodist movement as it expands and intersects with the Holiness Movement. Attention will be given to the theological tenets of the Holiness movement and the rise of nineteenth century Wesleyan-holiness denominations in relation to their social context. Prerequisite: CHTH 560 or permission of instructor. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 560 and CHTH 561.)

CHTH 562 Pentecostal Studies I: Theologies and Practices in Historical Context
2 hours. Places the theological and practical distinctives of Pentecostal-Charismatic movements in historical context. Students will analyze the movement by engaging with primary & secondary sources that show how the Pentecostal-Charismatic movement was created and how it changed over time. In addition, students will consider what those changes mean for the trajectory of the movement. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 562 and CHTH 563.)

CHTH 563 Pentecostal Studies II: Thinkers, Trends, and Innovations
2 hours. Examines theologians and practitioners that shape Pentecostal-Charismatic movements, theological & practical trends that distinguish Pentecostal-Charismatics from other Protestants, and innovations that create this growing form of global Christianity. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 562 and CHTH 563.)

CHTH 565 Seminar in Christian History and Theology II
2 hours. A small group of students study a specially selected topic with a professor. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 555 and CHTH 565.)

CHTH 568 Teaching Apprenticeship I: Internship and Pedagogy
2-4 hours. Part I of a unique practicum experience in which students participate in an internship in order to gain expertise in the tasks of their degree specialization. The practicum component is coupled with guidance and mentoring of a site supervisor and faculty who facilitate processes of integration. The theological and philosophical underpinnings of academic teaching, in the context of communicating practical strategies and advancing the student’s professional development as a teacher are explored. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 568 and CHTH 569.)

CHTH 569 Teaching Apprenticeship II: Internship and Pedagogy
2 hours. Part II of a unique practicum experience in which students participate in an internship in order to gain expertise in the tasks of their degree specialization. The practicum component is coupled with guidance and mentoring of a site supervisor and faculty who facilitate processes of integration. The theological and philosophical underpinnings of academic teaching, in the context of communicating practical strategies and advancing the student’s professional development as a teacher are explored. (Note: it is required that students take both CHTH 568 and CHTH 569.)

CHTH 581 (first semester) Research/Thesis in Biblical Studies
2 hours. First semester of research/thesis. See requirements outlined in Master of Arts in Theological Studies.

CHTH 582 (second semester) Research/Thesis in Biblical Studies
2 hours. Second semester of research/thesis. See requirements outlined in Master of Arts in Theological Studies.

CHTH 585 Thesis/Project Continuation
1 hour. Required for third and subsequent semesters of thesis research and writing.

CHTH 595 Special Study in Christian History and Theology
1 to 3 hours. A specially designed and individually tailored course of research, involving in-depth study of a particular question, problem, or issue presented by the student. The student must make application for the study prior to registration for the semester in which the study will be carried out. The application must be approved by the faculty member overseeing the study and the departmental chair. Special arrangements for regular courses of study must be approved by the dean.