Bachelors (BS) in Applied Science

Overview

This major offers a 60-semester-hour course of study, enabling students to pursue engineering in a discipline other than those currently offered at George Fox University. This dual-degree 3/2 program is offered for students interested in pursuing engineering in a discipline such as chemical*, environmental or aerospace engineering.

Students attend George Fox for three years, taking most of their general education, mathematics, science and lower-division engineering courses. They may then qualify to transfer to any other engineering school where they spend two more years completing their engineering degree. Students completing this five-year program will receive two bachelor of science degrees: a degree in applied science from George Fox University after their fourth year, and a degree in engineering from the cooperating engineering school after their fifth year.

Degree Outcomes

Graduates with a BS in applied science will:

  • Apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and applied sciences to their work
  • Design and conduct experiments and analyze and interpret data
  • Design systems, processes and programs to meet specified needs of the discipline
  • Function effectively on multidisciplinary teams
  • Identify and solve applied science problems using the techniques, skills and modern scientific tools necessary for professional practice
  • Understand and act according to the field's professional and ethical standards
  • Communicate effectively
  • Use their broad education to impact solutions in global and societal contexts
  • Understand contemporary issues in the field

Major Requirements

Complete the following:

This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 500 (test taken prior to March 2016) or a math SAT score of at least 530 (test taken March 2016 or later), or successful completion of MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics (or equivalent).
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 General Chemistry I.
Basic concepts of DC and AC electrical circuits are covered, as are voltage-current relationships for circuit elements, Kirchhoff's laws, and Thévenin and Norton theorems. Includes basic transient and sinusoidal steady-state analysis; frequency domain analysis; frequency response, resonance and measurement concepts. Applications of the operational amplifier. Analysis and design aided by circuit simulation software. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II, MATH 311 Differential Equations with Linear Algebra and PHYS 212 General Physics with Calculus II.
Static force and moment vectors, resultants. The free-body diagram is used extensively to understand the equilibrium of a whole physical system through isolation of each component, particle, or body. Applications to simple trusses, frames, and machines. Distributed loads. Internal forces in beams. Properties of areas, second moments. Laws of friction. Additional course fee is required. Co-requisite: MATH 301 Calculus III Prerequisites: ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II and PHYS 211 General Physics w/Calculus I.
This course considers the mathematical description of particles and rigid bodies in motion under the action of forces, moments and couples. Students learn how to describe the geometry of motion (kinematics) and then move into two and three-dimensional kinetic analysis. Applications using computer software are included. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGM 211 Statics
Classical treatment of thermodynamics emphasizing the first and second laws and their application to closed and open (control volume) systems undergoing steady, unsteady, and cyclic processes. Introduction to vapor power systems. Tabular and graphical thermodynamic property data are used in analytical work. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II and PHYS 212 General Physics with Calculus II.
Introduction to the concepts and methods of engineering problem solving and design. Topics include the following: analysis and design methodologies, structured computer programming, basic principles of engineering graphics, the visualization and modeling of real-world systems, and an introduction to the history and ethics of the engineering profession. Computer-aided-design (CAD) tools, solid modeling and simulation software, and mathematics software applications are presented. Students work on numerous team design projects, communicating their results through oral and written reports. Meets twice weekly in a lecture/lab environment. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics or equivalent.
Introduction to the concepts and methods of engineering problem solving and design. Topics include the following: analysis and design methodologies, structured computer programming, basic principles of engineering graphics, the visualization and modeling of real-world systems, and an introduction to the history and ethics of the engineering profession. Computer-aided-design (CAD) tools, solid modeling and simulation software, and mathematics software applications are presented. Students work on numerous team design projects, communicating their results through oral and written reports. Meets twice weekly in a lecture/lab environment. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGR 151 Engineering Principles I.
Course concerns the science underlying the behavior of engineering materials, including the relation between atomic structure and mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties in metals, ceramics, polymers, composite materials, and semiconductors. Phase diagrams, heat treatment, and corrosion mechanisms are also presented. Laboratory exercises are included to enhance course theory and to provide hands-on experience with materials measurement apparatus and analysis techniques. Two lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: CHEM 211 General Chemistry I and ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II.
The class is a study of limits limits of functions, applications of derivatives, and an introduction to integration. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics or equivalent.
A study of differential and integral calculus for functions of one variable. Additional topics include polar coordinates, infinite series, and parametric equations. Prerequisite: MATH 201 Calculus I.
This course is an extension of MATH 201 and 202 Calculus I and II to functions of more than one variable. Topics include vectors, vector-valued functions, partial derivatives, and multiple integration. Prerequisite: MATH 202 Calculus II.
A study of the theory, methods of solution, and applications of ordinary differential equations and the techniques of linear algebra necessary to accomplish that study. Prerequisite: MATH 202 Calculus II.
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using calculus methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: MATH 201 Calculus I.
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using calculus methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: PHYS 211 General Physics with Calculus I.

Choose at least 3-semester hours from the following:

Introduction to digital systems and binary codes; Boolean algebra and digital logic devices; combinational logic circuits and design methods; ROM and RAM memory elements; sequential logic circuits and design methods. Laboratory experience includes TTL logic circuits and CAD tools. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II or CSIS 201 Introduction to Computer Science I.
Introduction to the terminal characteristics of active semiconductor devices. Operation and small-signal models of diodes, junction and field-effect transistors, and operational amplifiers. Basic single-stage and multistage amplifiers: gain, biasing, and frequency response. Switching characteristics of transistors in saturation and cutoff. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: ENGE 220 Digital Logic Design and ENGE 250 Electrical Circuit Analysis.
Fundamental concepts of continuous-time and discrete-time signals and systems are covered. Topics covered include linear time-invariant systems, the convolution integral and impulse response; Fourier series and frequency domain analysis; Fourier and Laplace techniques; principles of sampling and modulation; theoretical and practical aspects of electrical networks; loop and nodal analysis of multi-port networks; admittance, impedance, and transmission parameters; and matrix solutions. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGE 250 Electrical Circuit Analysis and MATH 301 Calculus III.
Advanced topics in the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Covered topics include availability and irreversibility, vapor and gas power cycles, mixtures of gases and vapors, non-reacting flows, and compressible flow. Also covered are applications to spark and compression ignition engines, gas and vapor turbines, refrigeration systems, heat exchangers, and psychrometrics. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGM 311 Engineering Thermodynamics.
Behavior of deformable body systems under combinations of external loading is presented. Analysis of stress, deformation, strain, failure fatigue, and creep are included. Mathematical, graphical, and energy methods are utilized. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: ENGM 211 Statics and ENGR 250 Principles of Materials Science.
Course covers presentation and development of fundamental concepts of fluids such as continua, including velocity, pressure, and viscosity. Topics include fluid statics, hydrostatic analysis of submerged bodies and manometry methods; development of the governing equations of mass, momentum, and energy conservation for fluid motion using both integral and differential control volume analysis; incompressible inviscid flow, dimensional analysis and similitude; pipes, ducts, and open channel flow; and boundary-layer concepts and their application to lift and drag. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: ENGM 212 Dynamics, ENGM 311 Engineering Thermodynamics and MATH 311 Differential Equations w/ Linear Algebra.

Choose at least 6-semester hours from the following:

A study of numerical solutions of mathematical problems, including nonlinear equations, systems of linear equations, polynomial approximations, root finding, integration, and differential equations. Computer programs are written to solve these problems. (Identical to CSIS 300.) Prerequisites: MATH 311 Differential Equations with Linear Algebra and either CSIS 201 Introduction to Computer Science I or ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II.
A study of sample spaces, combinatorial methods, discrete and continuous distributions, moment-generating functions, and the central limit theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 290 Introduction to Proofs and MATH 301 Calculus III.
A study of matrices and their properties and application, linear transformations, and vector spaces. Prerequisites: MATH 310 Differential Equations with Linear Algebra.

Additional Requirements

Students must transfer 12 additional semester hours in engineering courses from the cooperating engineering school.

The remainder of the engineering curriculum will be taken in two years at the cooperating engineering school. For a complete list of required courses, consult the engineering advisor or CAP Coach in the IDEA Center. 

*It is strongly recommended that students interested in pursuing the 3/2 option in chemical engineering also enroll in CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry (4), CHEM 332 Organic Chemistry (4), CHEM 440 Thermodynamics (4) and CHEM 450 Quantum Chemistry (3) during their three years at George Fox University.