Bachelors (BS) in Cognitive Science

Overview

This major offers a 44-50-semester-hour course of study, students select from one of three concentrations. The major is an interdisciplinary study of the mind that draws on several disciplines to provide a broad foundation from which to understand and study mental processes. Students are provided flexibility within the major to explore that aspect of the mind that most interests them (e.g., psychological, physiological, philosophical, computational). Students are required to obtain a minimum grade of C- in all courses taken for the major.
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Major Requirements

Complete the following:

An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Major topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, thinking, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, social interaction, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite to most other psychology courses.
Applied statistics for the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on statistical logic and decision making. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.
This course provides an overview of the neuropsychological, neuroanatomical, and biochemical basis for mental functions including motor control, object recognition, spatial reasoning, attention, language, memory, and emotion. Methods of neuropsychological research are explored. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.
Traditional areas of study in cognitive psychology will be discussed. These areas include perception, attention, memory, reasoning, problem solving, and language. Traditional views as well as current trends will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
An introduction to methods of psychological research. Explores essential topics for experimental research including research design, reliability, validity, and research ethics. Students also learn how to critically assess research literature, assimilate information from a variety of sources, and interpret data. In addition, students learn how to prepare manuscripts in APA format and to prepare professional research presentations. Prerequisites: PSYC 150 General Psychology and PSYC 240 Statistical Procedures.
Students will explore research design, analyses, and computer applications in the areas of cognition, learning, sensation and perception, and development using a variety of hands-on methods. Prerequisites: PSYC 240 Statistical Procedures and PSYC 391 Research Methods.
This is a capstone course for the major focusing on the integration of Christianity and psychology and the application of psychological principles and findings in every day settings. Required for all psychology majors. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: senior status.

Concentrations (25-31 hours) - choose one

Choose two of the following:

Students must complete one of the following biology series, either BIOL 211/212 or BIOL 221/222.
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or permission from instructor. Additional course fee is required.

Complete the following:

An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of Neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
A foundational course for the study of computer science and information systems. The course covers an overview of programming methodology and gives the student an ability to write computer programs using standard style and structure. Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent. Additional course fee required.
A foundational course for the study of computer science and information systems. The course covers an overview of programming methodology and gives the student an ability to write computer programs using standard style and structure. Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Prerequisite: CSIS 201 Introduction to Computer Science I or ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II. Additional course fee required.
This course is designed to introduce students to what it means to think and live philosophically. There are a number of different variations of this course. Each variation picks a different topic through which to explore how philosophy be a tool for interpreting, understanding and interacting with the world. Not only that, we will also examine how philosophy can shape the way in which we live out our lives. Each course includes some reading of Plato and at least one other major philosophy in the tradition. Examples of different variations of this course include: "God, Freedom and Evil", "Simplicity", "Socrates and Plato", "Land and Humans", and "Virtue and Faith".
What kinds of things exist? How do we know they do, if we do? The subject of this course will vary term to term, but can include freewill, theory of knowledge, skepticism, the nature of existence, human nature, the nature of God, personal identity, realism and antirealism, the nature of science and others. May be repeated for credit under different topics.

Choose one of the following:

The class is a study of limits limits of functions, applications of derivatives, and an introduction to integration. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics or equivalent.
An introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics covered include sets, functions, math induction, combinatorics, recurrence, graph theory, trees, and networks.

Choose one of the following:

Some of these courses have additional prerequisite courses not included in the major.
A study of the nature of verbal symbols as they function in communication. The course will include phonetic transcription, semantics, modern grammatical theories, history of the English language, and modern English dialects.
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence, knowledge representation, problem solving, and AI search techniques. AI solutions will be developed in an appropriate AI language. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 310 Data Structures and File Processing.
This course is intended to facilitate a smooth transition from lower-level, computation-oriented math courses to upper-level, more theoretical courses. Topics include symbolic logic, methods of proof, and set theory. Prerequisite: MATH 201 Calculus I.
Logic involves a study of Aristotelian forms of deductive reasoning, including the syllogism, inductive reasoning, fallacies, and some aspect of symbolic logic, including Venn diagrams and truth tables. Its goal is to facilitate sound thinking that is both creative and critical.
study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from the prenatal period through late childhood. (Identical to FCSC 311.) Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A survey of learning theories and the basic research questions being asked in this important field. Special emphasis will be placed on translating experimental theory into practical methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
Using psychophysical techniques, students will study sensory systems, including vision, audition, olfaction, taste, touch, and kinesthesis. Classic and current theories of perception and sensation will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A comparative study of world societies and their ways of life.

Complete the following:

A foundational course for the study of computer science and information systems. The course covers an overview of programming methodology and gives the student an ability to write computer programs using standard style and structure. Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent. Additional course fee required.
A foundational course for the study of computer science and information systems. The course covers an overview of programming methodology and gives the student an ability to write computer programs using standard style and structure. Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Prerequisite: CSIS 201 Introduction to Computer Science I or ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II. Additional course fee required.
An introduction to the concepts of information organization, methods of representing information both internally and externally. The course begins with basic structures (stacks, queues, linked lists, and trees) and moves through more complex data structures into the processing of files (sequential, relative, indexed sequential, and others). Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Additional course fee required. Prerequisites: CSIS 201 Introduction to Computer Science I and CSIS 202 Introduction to Computer Science II.
This course introduces the student to the basic concepts and techniques of artificial intelligence, knowledge representation, problem solving, and AI search techniques. AI solutions will be developed in an appropriate AI language. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 310 Data Structures and File Processing.
The class is a study of limits limits of functions, applications of derivatives, and an introduction to integration. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics or equivalent.
An introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics covered include sets, functions, math induction, combinatorics, recurrence, graph theory, trees, and networks.

Choose two of the following:

Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of Neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
Course is an introduction to the principles and methods with which one builds effective interfaces for users. A basic precept of HCI is that users should be able to focus on solving problems, rather than dealing with the intricacies of complex software. Interfaces must be accessible, meaningful, visually consistent, comprehensive, accurate, and oriented around the tasks that users tend to perform. The course will provide a balance of practical and theoretical knowledge, giving students experience ordinarily not provided by other courses in computer science. Students will also participate in group-projects to design, implement, and evaluate user interfaces. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 201 Intro to Computer Science I.
study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from the prenatal period through late childhood. (Identical to FCSC 311.) Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
Students will develop skills in understanding and critically evaluating educational and psychological tests (measures of ability, achievement, personality, and vocational interest). Also, modern principles of "psychometrics" - data-based analysis of test items, scores, and interpretations - will be emphasized, particularly the reliability and validity of items and scales. Students will have hands-on experience with various tests and will computer-analyze sample data from test development projects. Prerequisites: PSYC 150 General Psychology and PSYC 240 Statistical Procedures. Recommended: PSYC 391 Research Methods
Using psychophysical techniques, students will study sensory systems, including vision, audition, olfaction, taste, touch, and kinesthesis. Classic and current theories of perception and sensation will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.

Choose two of the following:

Students must complete one of the following biology series, either BIOL 211/212 or BIOL 221/222.
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or permission from instructor. Additional course fee is required.

Complete the following:

An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of Neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 500 (test taken prior to March 2016) or a math SAT score of at least 530 (test taken March 2016 or later), or successful completion of MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics (or equivalent).
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 General Chemistry I.

Choose two of the following:

Some of these courses have additional prerequisite courses not included in the major.
Investigation of physiological principles in animals, with 4 hours. A majors-level course is intended to meet the physiology requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. Investigation of physiological principles in humans/mammals, with emphasis on mechanisms of integration and homeostasis at cellular, organ, and system levels. Topics include muscular, neural, vascular, excretory, and endocrine interactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
This course includes the study of cell physiology, energetics, neurobiology, muscle biology, and cell signaling. Other topics that will be discussed are cancer and immunology at the cellular level. Laboratory will focus on current cell culturing and analysis techniques. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II, and CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry I. Recommended: CHEM 341 Biochemistry I.
A majors-level course intended to meet the anatomy requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. A course presenting a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture presentations begin with an introduction of anatomical terminology, tissue classification, and developmental origins to systems. Body structure will be studied by organ systems and will include histology. Laboratory work will follow a regional gross anatomy of the human body through cadaver dissection, human skeletal collections and preserved specimens. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I, BIOL 212 General Biology II and BIOL 333 Advanced Physiology; or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I, BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II and BIOL 333 Advanced Physiology, or instructor's permission.
A systematic and theoretical study of the biochemical activities of living cells. Topics to be covered will include: the structure, properties, and molecular interactions of biomolecules, metabolic pathways, bioenergetics, and metabolism of biomolecules, and RNA, DNA, and protein synthesis. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry I and CHEM 332 Organic Chemistry II.
study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from the prenatal period through late childhood. (Identical to FCSC 311.) Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A survey of learning theories and the basic research questions being asked in this important field. Special emphasis will be placed on translating experimental theory into practical methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
Using psychophysical techniques, students will study sensory systems, including vision, audition, olfaction, taste, touch, and kinesthesis. Classic and current theories of perception and sensation will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.