Bachelors (BS) in Exercise Science

Overview

Exercise Science offers a 58- to 59-semester-hour interdisciplinary course of study, designed to prepare students for work in the field of physical therapy and the exercise science fields. The major includes strong emphasis on science and health and human performance fields. Students are also prepared for fields outside of physical therapy and exercise science. This major can assist students seeking advanced degrees in the fields of occupational therapy, chiropractic and the physician assistant profession.

Students are required to obtain a minimum grade of C- in all courses taken for the major.

Degree Outcomes

Graduates with a degree in exercise science will:

  • Develop a passion for learning about the human body and have a greater appreciation for its development, function and spiritual nature
  • Use scientific research processes effectively to ask relevant questions, collect data, present results and evaluate results
  • Demonstrate proficiency in the scientific constructs and application of principles to lead clients to better health
  • Possess the requisite knowledge to work in science-related fields related to exercise and physical activity
  • Have readiness to pursue advanced educational training in exercise science or to enter professional schools in the health sciences

Major Requirements

Complete the following:

Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or permission from instructor. Additional course fee is required.
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 500 (test taken prior to March 2016) or a math SAT score of at least 530 (test taken March 2016 or later), or successful completion of MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics (or equivalent).
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: CHEM 211 General Chemistry I.
An introduction to the study of human communication. Application of communication principles to interpersonal, group, and public contexts. Particular emphasis on the practice of public speaking. Students will prepare and deliver several oral presentations.
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using algebraic methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics.
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using algebraic methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: PHYS 201 General Physics I.
An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Major topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, thinking, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, social interaction, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite to most other psychology courses.
An introductory survey of athletic training. Emphasis will be on terminology, injury prevention, evaluation, treatment, and emergency care procedures. Common taping techniques also will be presented. Additional course fee is required.
Application of human anatomy and physical laws to the explanation of movement activities. Special emphasis is given to detailed analysis of various sports activities. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
Application of principles of physiology to physical activity. Special attention is given to the effect of exercise on the various body systems and the construction of training programs. The laboratory component explores the assessment of resting metabolic rate, energy expenditure, body composition, respiratory function, maximum oxygen uptake, lactate threshold, strength and flexibility, and other physiological responses to exercise. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
A study of the development of motor skills. Psychological principles of learning are applied to motor-skill learning. A review of research and an inquiry into the effect of various conditions on the learning and performance of motor skills from early childhood through the adult years.

A supervised experience in the discipline, including internships and practica required for professional programs. This experience must have an on-site supervisor and a departmental instructor overseeing, designing and evaluating the content of the course. Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Research of current issues in health, physical education, and athletics. Senior thesis and public presentation of thesis is required.

Choose one of the following:

An introduction to probability and statistics with content and application directed toward the natural and physical sciences. Topics to be covered include methods of describing data, probability, random variables and their distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, linearregression, and correlation. Prerequisite: MATH 180 College Algebra or equivalent.
Applied statistics for the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on statistical logic and decision making. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.

Choose one of the following:

An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
The comparative study of the structure and functional morphology of organisms in the phylum Chordata. Laboratory will emphasize dissection of representative vertebrate animals. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
Investigation of physiological principles in animals, with 4 hours. A majors-level course is intended to meet the physiology requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. Investigation of physiological principles in humans/mammals, with emphasis on mechanisms of integration and homeostasis at cellular, organ, and system levels. Topics include muscular, neural, vascular, excretory, and endocrine interactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.
An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of Neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II.

Choose two of the following:

Instruction in concepts related to developing and maintaining physical fitness and movement skills.
In-depth study of the lower extremities including skills of injury evaluation, physical examination and treatment. One 1-hour lab per week. Pre-requisite: Athletic Training major or instructor permission.
In-depth study of the spine and upper extremities including skills of injury evaluation, physical examination and treatment. One 1-hour lab per week. Pre-requisite: Athletic Training major or instructor permission.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from infancy to old age. Will not count as part of the psychology major. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from young adulthood to old age. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A study of the unique physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral developmental changes during the period of adolescence. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
This course provides an overview of the neuropsychological, neuroanatomical, and biochemical basis for mental functions including motor control, object recognition, spatial reasoning, attention, language, memory, and emotion. Methods of neuropsychological research are explored. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.
A study of the nature, causation, and treatment of the major psychiatric and behavioral disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.

Optional

Choices of the following courses are dependent upon the direction the student has previously selected with regard to graduate school or profession. However, a student isn't required to take any of these courses. Some courses listed below are only offered every other year. Plan accordingly.
Examines the knowledge, skills, and values that the entry-level certified athletic trainer must possess to recognize, treat, and refer, when appropriate, the general medical conditions and disabilities of athletes and others involved in physical activity. Students will be introduced and exposed to various health care providers.
An emphasis on the knowledge, skills, and values required of an athletic trainer on pharmacologic applications, including indications, contraindications, precautions, interactions, and governing regulations relevant to the treatment of injuries and illnesses of the physically active. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
Course will examine exercise procedures as the first modality for rehabilitation of the injured athlete. Also examines the role of exercise for the prevention of injuries, as well as rehabilitation to all major joints and musculature of the body. Includes a lab for practice. Prerequisites: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries and Athletic Training major or instructor permission.
Course will examine the role of therapeutic modalities including thermal modalities, electrical agents, deep heating agents, and mechanical modalities in the rehabilitation of the injured athlete. Includes a lab for practice. Prerequisites: HHPE 390 Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries and Athletic Training major or instructor permission.
Application of exercise testing and prescription of individuals ranging from athletes to special populations. Includes aspects of nutrition, disease, training methods, and exercise responses. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II. Additional course fee required.
Emphasis is given to methods of evaluation in programs of physical education. Testing procedures, standard tests, physical examinations, and evaluation activities are discussed.
A study of nutrients present in food and their relation to the nutritive needs of the human body. Emphasis on the young adult, along with discussion of contemporary nutrition-related topics of national and global concern. Computer-assisted dietary analysis included. (Identical to HLTH 300.)