Health Teaching Minor

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Minor Requirements

21-23 credit hours

Complete the following:

Issues concerned with the use, misuse, and abuse of selected pharmacological agents. Social, psychological, physical, and moral implications are considered. Particular consideration is given to ergogenic aids in athletics.
A study of marriage and the family from a sociological perspective, including historical, cross-cultural, and economic backgrounds. A Christian faith perspective will emphasize the worth of people, the importance of the family as a place of nurture, and the gift of marriage. (Identical to HLTH 223.)
Instruction in first aid and safety and leading to certification in first aid and cardiopulmonary resuscitation CPR). Additional course fee is required.
A study of causes, symptoms, and results of stress. Introduces practical techniques to alleviate stress, promote relaxation, and encourage a healthy lifestyle.
A study of nutrients present in food and their relation to the nutritive needs of the human body. Emphasis on the young adult, along with discussion of contemporary nutrition-related topics of national and global concern. Computer-assisted dietary analysis included. (Identical to HLTH 300.)
A study of our nation's current health problems and concerns. Emphasis on health consumerism and current trends, diseases, the sanctity of life, and fitness. Goal is to develop an educated view on current health issues.

Choose two of the following:

Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or permission from instructor. Additional course fee is required.
Application of principles of physiology to physical activity. Special attention is given to the effect of exercise on the various body systems and the construction of training programs. The laboratory component explores the assessment of resting metabolic rate, energy expenditure, body composition, respiratory function, maximum oxygen uptake, lactate threshold, strength and flexibility, and other physiological responses to exercise. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.
study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from the prenatal period through late childhood. (Identical to FCSC 311.) Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.