Quaker Studies Minor

Minor Requirements

19 credit hours

Complete the following:

This course explores the rich heritage of the Quaker movement in its historical, social, and religious settings. The distinguishing beliefs of Friends and contemporary trends also will be studied, with particular interest in how to apply timeless truths in timely ways.
An exploration of how people grow and change spiritually. The study integrates biblical insights, classic Christian spirituality, developmental theory, and contemporary individual and corporate practice in spiritual formation. It will critically explore how spirituality relates to vocation, relationships, and the demands of daily living.
Designed to address topics of interest to Friends and matters of Quaker faith and practice. Topics will vary from semester to semester, and include sacramentality, worship and ministry, peace and social work, evangelism, leadership, decision making, and Christian testimonies.
Christianity's development from the dawn of the Protestant Reformation through its global spread during the modern era, observing its historical context and relationships to the surrounding cultures. (Identical to HIST 402.)

Choose one of the following:

Focusing centrally on Jesus' teachings about peacemaking, this course deals with the biblical treatment of peacemaking, including the prophetic and apocalyptic visions of the kingdom, and the interpretations of these teachings by the early church. Attention also will be given to what it means to work for peace in today's world, as co-laborers with Christ. Prerequisite: BIBL 100 Bible Survey or BIBL 102 Literature of the New Testament.
An exploration of American thought on the subject of war, both today and in past crises such as the American Revolution, Civil War, wars with the American Indians, the world wars, Vietnam War, and the Gulf War; a study of the official position major church bodies have taken in regard to war; and the experiences of individuals who refused to fight. (Identical to PSCI 420.)
A study of communication principles found useful in managing conflict productively. Focus is given to conflict occurring in institutional and organizational settings between individuals and groups. Attention also is given to conflict in social, national, and international settings. (Identical to PSCI 310.)

Choose two of the following:

(6 credit hours)
What is the nature of religion? Is there a God? What evidence is there for the existence of God? What role does reason play in faith? Does the existence of evil rule out God's existence? What is religious experience? Does it provide grounds for rational religious belief? This course is a general introduction to the philosophy of religion and some of the problems falling under that title.
A sociological examination of the meaning and function of religion in human society. Gives attention to the development of religious organization, the relationship of religion to class and politics, the nature of the sacred, dimensions of religiosity, and denominational diversity in the United States. (Identical to SOCI 230.)
The development of Christianity from its appearance within the Greco-Roman world through the medieval period, and its influence as a base for culture in the West. (Identical to HIST 401.)
Designed to address topics of interest to Friends and matters of Quaker faith and practice. Topics will vary from semester to semester, and include sacramentality, worship and ministry, peace and social work, evangelism, leadership, decision making, and Christian testimonies.

Student may also choose RELI 385, but must complete 3 RELI 385 Quaker Seminars (1 hour each)

RELI 430 may be taken in place of RELI 230.