TESOL Minor

The TESOL minor is designed to provide a basic foundation for students who are interested in teaching English to speakers of other languages, including teaching English as a foreign language overseas, and tutoring or teaching English as a second language in local church or community programs.

NOTE: Students interested in pursuing TESOL as a profession should continue their studies at the graduate level. A master's degree program is recommended for those interested in teaching at a college or community college.

Minor Requirements

21-23 credit hours

Complete the following:

A study of the nature of verbal symbols as they function in communication. The course will include phonetic transcription, semantics, modern grammatical theories, history of the English language, and modern English dialects.
This course familiarizes students with linguistic, psychological, cognitive, and socio-cultural aspects of second (or additional) language acquisition and related language acquisition theories. Students reflect on their own language learning and acquisition experiences in light of these theories and consider implications for the teaching and learning of additional languages. Offered every other year.
An introduction to the theory and practice of teaching English (or any language) to non-native speakers. Topics include principles of language teaching, communicative and interactive approaches, teaching methods and techniques for improving different language skills, lesson planning, materials selection and adaptation, testing, cultural issues, teaching English as Christian witness, and working with English-as-a-second-language students in a mainstream class. Students relate theory to practice in a school- or community-based practicum.
A comparative study of world societies and their ways of life.
One year of a foreign language or, for non-native speakers of English, two of these courses: ESLA 281, ESLA 282, ESLA 283       (6-8 hours)

Choose one of the following:

This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
Cross-cultural communication in Christian ministry, focusing on the concepts of identification, mutuality, the process of cultural change from a biblical perspective, and strategies for cross-cultural outreach.