Information Systems Major

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If you’re seeking a degree that prepares you to find technological solutions in today’s business environment, George Fox University's bachelor's degree in information systems is an ideal fit.

Students in our information systems major study the integration of information technology solutions and business processes to meet the needs of an organization, enabling them to effectively achieve their objectives. Information systems requires an understanding of both the technical and organizational factors that affect the creation and deployment of information technology solutions.

Our 49-semester-hour information systems course of study covers topics ranging from the principles of financial accounting and business ethics to web-based programming, client-server systems, software engineering and data communications and networks.


Request more information about the information systems major at George Fox University or schedule a visit to begin your education at Oregon's Christian university, ranked as one of the top Christian colleges in the nation by Forbes.

Jobs, Internships and Graduate School

Information Systems majors at George Fox study at one of the West Coast's top Christian colleges

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, computer and information technology occupations are projected to grow 12 percent from 2016 to 2026. These occupations are expected to add about 44,200 new jobs, from about 367,600 jobs to about 411,800 jobs from 2016 to 2026, in part due to a greater emphasis on cloud computing, the collection and storage of big data, more everyday items becoming connected to the Internet in what is commonly referred to as the “Internet of things,” and the continued demand for mobile computing.

  • Analyst for Division of Legislative Finance, State of Alaska
  • Software Engineer, Consonus Health
  • Senior Support Engineer, Fiserv
  • Senior Program Manager, Microsoft
  • Electrical Engineering Technical Designer, Boeing
  • Senior Software Engineer, GE
  • Senior Software Engineer, Intel
  • Software Developer, McAfee
  • Software Engineering Manager, Mentor Graphics
  • Senior Research Scientist, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
  • Project Manager, Rentrak
  • Software Engineer, Oracle
  • Software Engineer, Axium
  • Senior Products Analyst, Huron Consulting Group
  • Informatics Research Scientist, DOW AgroSciences
  • Component Design Engineer, Intel
  • Security Analyst, Nike
  • Manager of Language Modeling Research, Nuance Communication
  • Programmer Analyst, Boeing
  • Microsoft, Portland
  • Intel, Hillsboro, Ore.
  • NASA, Cleveland
  • Oregon State University
  • Washington State University
  • Oregon Graduate Institute
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • Boston University
  • Portland State University
  • Virginia Tech
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Major Requirements

Complete the following:

This introductory survey will examine the major functional areas of business and afford the student an opportunity to consider this major as a path to a career. Emphasis is given to contemporary business concepts, in particular, and examination of business as a field for stewardship.
Statistical procedures with applications in management and economics. Emphasis on the development of a basic knowledge of the statistical tools available for analysis of problems and decision making. Prerequisites: MATH 180 College Algebra or higher math course, or an SAT math score of 620 or higher or an ACT score of 28 or higher.
This course is designed to prepare students to meet the ethical challenges facing employees in modern business and nonprofit organizations. The course will address moral issues at every organizational level - personal, interpersonal, group, and system wide. Topics will include identifying personal mission and values; developing character; faith in the workplace; ethical perspectives, moral reasoning, and decision-making formats; ethical organizational communication and influence; ethical group behavior and leadership; and the creation of ethical organizational climates. Prerequisite or Co-requisite of BUSN 110.
A study of the theory and practice of management. The course involves discussion and application of areas such as social responsibility, strategy, problem solving, communication, change, job performance, and financial/operational controls. Prerequisite or Co-requisite of BUSN 110 Introduction to Business

Choose one of the following:

An introduction to the macro aspects of the social science concerned with the allocation of resources. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles of the economy as a whole, dealing with economic data, behavior, and theory at the aggregate level of the economy. The course studies topics such as government spending, taxation, and monetary policies, as well as events and issues in the global economy. ECON 211 and ECON 212 are complementary courses; however, it is preferred that ECON 211 be taken first.
An introduction to the micro aspects of the social science concerned with the allocation of resources. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles governing production, distribution, consumption, and exchange of wealth. The course studies the behavior of microeconomic units such as individuals, households, firms, and industries. ECON 211 and ECON 212 are complementary courses; however, it is preferred that ECON 211 be taken first. Prerequisites: Students must have completed MATH 180 College Algebra or higher math course, or an SAT math score of 620 or higher or an ACT score of 28 or higher.

Complete the following:

A foundational course for the study of computer science and information systems. The course covers an overview of programming methodology and gives the student an ability to write computer programs using standard style and structure. Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent. Additional course fee required.
A foundational course for the study of computer science and information systems. The course covers an overview of programming methodology and gives the student an ability to write computer programs using standard style and structure. Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Prerequisite: CSIS 201 Introduction to Computer Science I or ENGR 152 Engineering Principles II. Additional course fee required.
A computer programming course using web-based technologies. The emphasis of the course is placed on fundamental concepts of computer programming and application development through the creation of interactive Web applications. The course is designed for students who want to design and implement web-based applications. Additional course fee required.
In a highly connected, data intensive, and cost-focused business environment, the practice of information security is not a business advantage; it is a customer requirement. Viruses, malware, trojans, denial of service attacks, phishing, and even Wiki leaks have become headline news. Failure to insure the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of data, costs companies millions, if not billions of dollars in legal settlements, lost business, and trade secrets. In this breadth-based course, you will get an overview of information security principles and practices, including security models, risk management, access controls, intrusion detection and prevention, cryptography, software vulnerabilities, and ethical issues. This class will also provide an overview of digital forensics. Students will learn techniques behind digital forensic investigations and evidence collection, and will cover the fundamental steps of the traditional computer forensic methodology. Topics will include building forensic workstations, collecting evidence, extracting artifacts, identifying unknown files and reassembling evidence from network packet captures and device images. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 202 Introduction to Computer Science II.
This course provides an introduction to constructing complete information systems based on the client-server model. On the client side, we introduce graphical user-interfaces, their design and implementation, as well as commonly used tools such as database access clients, and report generators. On the server side, we introduce database management systems and the use of server-side programming tools that provide connectivity for clients and access to database systems. Along the way, students are introduced to the basics of distributed computing and computer networks. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 202 Introduction to Computer Science II.
An introduction to the strategies used in producing quality software. The life cycle of software development is presented and utilized. Larger projects are undertaken by teams of students in the initial phases. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 202 Introduction to Computer Science II.
Course is an introduction to the principles and methods with which one builds effective interfaces for users. A basic precept of HCI is that users should be able to focus on solving problems, rather than dealing with the intricacies of complex software. Interfaces must be accessible, meaningful, visually consistent, comprehensive, accurate, and oriented around the tasks that users tend to perform. The course will provide a balance of practical and theoretical knowledge, giving students experience ordinarily not provided by other courses in computer science. Students will also participate in group-projects to design, implement, and evaluate user interfaces. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 201 Intro to Computer Science I.
An introduction to the field of communications among computers and computer systems, with an emphasis placed on LANS (Local Area Network Systems) and the OSI model. Students will experience the installation of one or more network systems. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CSIS 202 Introduction to Computer Science II.
This course introduces the student to system administration of a LAN. Topics covered include adding and removing users; monitoring and controlling processes; adding, removing, and managing groups; mounting and unmounting filesystems; monitoring and troubleshooting a TCP/IP network; managing and controlling network and system security; and administration of network file systems. Prerequisite: CSIS 350 Data Communications and Networks. Additional course fee required.
Servant engineering is a two-semester course sequence typically taken in the student’s junior year. In the summer before the course begins, students research a potential engineering project designed to serve others. These projects are proposed early in the first semester, and the most feasible projects are selected for the program. Students are then assigned to a team of four or five who work on a selected project. Projects might require a multi-disciplinary team ranging from computer science to civil engineering, or they might be more focused on a specific skill-set. Each team has a faculty mentor who helps guide the project. In both semesters, teams meet weekly with their faculty mentors and work through problem definition, specification development and conceptual development, with the goal of selecting a specific design for detailed design-and-build. Every project will be an opportunity to use the gifts that God has given us to serve others. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGR 152. Final enrollment is contingent on approval from the College of Engineering.
Servant engineering is a two-semester course sequence typically taken in the student’s junior year. In the summer before the course begins, students research a potential engineering project designed to serve others. These projects are proposed early in the first semester, and the most feasible projects are selected for the program. Students are then assigned to a team of four or five who work on a selected project. Projects might require a multi-disciplinary team ranging from computer science to civil engineering, or they might be more focused on a specific skill-set. Each team has a faculty mentor who helps guide the project. In both semesters, teams meet weekly with their faculty mentors and work through problem definition, specification development and conceptual development, with the goal of selecting a specific design for detailed design-and-build. Every project will be an opportunity to use the gifts that God has given us to serve others. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: ENGR 381. Final enrollment is contingent on approval from the College of Engineering.
In the senior design sequence, students apply their knowledge and design skills gained through course work to an industry-based project. In the first semester, interdisciplinary teams are formed to begin projects in conjunction with participating industrial sponsors. Necessary background research and feasibility studies are completed. Students must also consider the ethical, moral, environmental, and social impact of their designs. Collaboration with other departments of the university is encouraged. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: senior status in the engineering major.
The projects that were initiated in the first semester are further developed through simulation, prototyping, and testing. Use of analytic, computer, experimental, and design techniques is applied throughout the project. The design sequence culminates in the construction of the projects, oral presentations, and formal written reports. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ENGR 481 Senior Design I.
An introduction to discrete mathematics. Topics covered include sets, functions, math induction, combinatorics, recurrence, graph theory, trees, and networks.
Students are required to complete an additional 6-hours of electives from the following subject areas: ACCT, BUSN, CSIS, MGMT, or MKTG coursework 

Student Experiences

Aaron Schnieder

“When I entered the computer science and information systems program at George Fox University, I had never written a single line of code. The GFU professors excelled at explaining the core concepts of software development in an easy to understand and digestible manner. Over the course of my four years in the program, I went from zero knowledge of software engineering to a feeling of confidence when I got my first job.”

- Aaron Schnieder

Points of Distinction

  • Students will gain hands-on, practical experience.
  • Small class sizes ensure that students receive individual attention and career mentoring.
  • Students have the opportunity to compete in the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest. In 2015, George Fox students claimed an Oregon site championship in both Division 1 and Division 2 of the competition, which included schools from all over the Pacific Northwest.

Why George Fox?

Christ-centered community

Our faith influences everything we do here, from the way our professors teach to the way we relate to one another and serve in the community.

Global opportunities

More than half of George Fox undergraduate students study abroad, ranking George Fox among the nation's leaders in study abroad participation (U.S. News & World Report).

Small classes

Our 14-to-1 student-to-faculty ratio means you'll get to know your professors on a personal level.

National recognition

George Fox University is a Christian university classified by U.S. News & World Report as a first-tier national university, and Forbes ranks George Fox among the highest Christian colleges in the country.