Trauma Response Institute (TRI) Continuing Education and Graduate Course Descriptions

Courses in green are NOT offered as Continuing Education courses

TRMA 500 Introduction to Traumatology
1 credit hour. This course provides an introduction to traumatology including the nature of traumatic events and the impact on biological, psychological, and social functioning. In addition, the course will explore PTSD prevention, intervention, and postvention services, as well as the various roles and tasks of the trauma responder. Vicarious trauma and compassion fatigue as it applies to the trauma responder will also be explored.

TRMA 501 Basic Skills in Individual and Group Crisis Intervention
1 credit hour.  This course prepares the student for designing individual and group crisis interventions in the aftermath of a critical incident in accordance with best-practice strategies and one’s scope of practice and competence. Students will apply universal and foundational traumatic stress assessment skills in discerning appropriate intervention methods based on level of need, context, and stage of recovery. Psychological/ emotional first-aid and revised CISM processes will be mastered. Differentiation will be made between crisis intervention verses psychotherapy. Students will learn individual crisis intervention models, including the SAFER-R model along with a review of suicide prevention protocols. Students will also learn the difference between demobilizations, defusings, and debriefings in group settings and will demonstrate basic competencies in using the techniques via role-plays and video presentations.
Prerequisite: TRMA 500 Introduction to Traumatology (may be waived with professor permission).

TRMA 502 Interpersonal Neurobiology of Trauma
1 credit hour.  This course examines the neurobiology of trauma and is intended to deepen the student’s knowledge base regarding the interplay between a traumatic experience, social interactions, and neurological functioning. The interpersonal neurobiology perspective allows the student to understand not only the immediate physiological impact of a traumatic incident, but the interconnectedness between our social, emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being in the aftermath of chronic abuse and/or a sudden traumatic event. Students will demonstrate an interpersonal neurobiologically-informed assessment of human functioning and response, and an ability to communicate this information in psychoeducational arenas tailored for survivors of traumatic incidents.
Prerequisite: GCEP 587 Interpersonal Neurobiology/Pharmacology (may be waived with professor permission).

TRMA 503 Grief and Loss Across the Lifespan
1 credit hour.  Of central concern to the trauma responder is helping individuals and communities recover from extreme loss. This course examines the nature of grief in the face of loss as experienced across the lifespan. Students will gain a deeper awareness of common grief reactions as well as short and long-term psychosocial challenges congruent with common recovery processes. Using theories examining individual and systemic resiliency, students will explore personal and contextual issues influencing an individual and community’s resiliency in the face of loss. And finally, students will learn how to discern grief processes beyond one’s scope of practice within the trauma response setting.

TRMA 560 Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Applications in Crisis Intervention
1 credit hour.  Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) is recognized as a best practice strategy effective in mitigating the impact of traumatic stress in those struggling in the aftermath of a critical incident. In this course students will learn a series of CBT techniques useful in early and middle stage interventions with individuals and groups. Students will identify the difference between using these techniques in the context of crisis response verses therapy. Competence in the techniques will be demonstrated via videotape or class role-plays.

TRMA 581 Legal and Ethical Issues in Trauma Response
1 credit hour.  This course examines ethical issues central to trauma response practice. A multi-systemic model for understanding trauma response services and the evolving maturation of the specialty, along with ethical codes emerging from within the trauma response field will be presented. Within this context, various elements of practice will be explored during the Field Experience year such as: Recruitment; informed consent; preparing for an assignment; functioning as a team member; honoring the culture of the setting; re-entry; field supervision; confidentiality; scope of practice; scope of competence; compassion fatigue; and media management.
Prerequisites: TRMA 500 Introduction to Traumatology and TRMA 501 Basic Skills in Individual and Group Crisis Intervention.
Corequisite: TRMA 591 Field Experience in Trauma Response I.

TRMA 582 Field Operations and Incident Command
1 credit hour. Students will complete three United States Federal Emergency Management Agency web-based courses: IS-100 Introduction to Incident Command System; IS-700 National Incident Management System; and IS-7 Citizen’s Guide to Disaster Assistance. Proof of successful completion of the online exam will be required. Course content will then be discussed in class and applied as relevant to the student’s Field Experience. In addition, participants will interview two distinct organizations involved in crisis response work (a non-government organization and a government-funded agency) regarding their policies and procedures for deploying trauma / crisis responders according to the multi-systemic best-practice model presented in TRMA 581 Legal and Ethical Issues in Trauma Response.
Prerequisites: TRMA 500 Introduction to Traumatology and TRMA 501 Basic Skills in Individual and Group Crisis Intervention.
Corequisite: TRMA 592 Field Experience in Trauma Response I.

TRMA 585 Trauma Elective
1 credit hour.  These courses focus on the contextual issues and best-practice strategies related to trauma response within specific settings and populations requiring mastery for effective early to middle stage crisis intervention. Course offerings will be rotated on an every 2 to 3 year basis depending on interest, and will be tailored to specific professions often called upon as first responders serving on trauma-response teams.

  • TRMA 585 Developing a Professional Online Identity (Hybrid)
    2 credit hours. The purpose of this course is to acquaint participants with professional online identity formation and profiles, to learn how to use social media responsibly and ethically, and to gain understanding about the influence online information can have on careers.
  • TRMA 585 School-Based Trauma Response: Part A - Tragedy Response Teams (Flight Teams)
    1 credit hour. This elective provides training in the Safe Schools method of providing trauma response services to neighboring schools impacted by a critical incident. You will be trained in the Washington County School District's method of Flight Team response. This course (Part A) is offered during the Summer term of odd years (i.e. Summer 2015, 2017, etc.).
  • TRMA 585 School-Based Trauma Response: Part B - Mass Disaster Crisis Response
    1 credit hour. This elective provides training in the Safe Schools method of providing mass disaster services within a school system. This course (Part B) is offered during Summer term of even years (i.e. Summer, 2014, 2016, etc.)
  • TRMA 585 Developing Community Resiliency Programs: Preventing & Responding to Child Sexual Predators
    1 credit hour. Students will learn about the role of community education and organization in trauma prevention and intervention through the application of skills in response to child sexual abuse and exploitation. Class presentations include guest speakers representing the various professions involved in identifying child predators, educating community groups to adopt safe child care practices, and assisting those groups in recovery in the aftermath of a traumatic incident. Project-based activities include applying concepts presented in class to simulated case examples based on actual public events.
  • TRMA 585 Multigenerational Impact of Race & Ethnic Marginalization on Trauma
    1 credit hour. Students will explore the multi-generational impact of racial and ethnic marginalization. The course will also explore the impact of social dynamics on human development across the lifespan. Students will be invited to see the role generational trauma plays in increasing vulnerable populations' exposure to additional stressors.
  • TRMA 585 Aging and Life Transitions
    1 credit hour. Older adults are often overlooked in the field of mental health. The class is designed to raise your awareness of the mental health needs and late life transitions/losses affecting elders. Regardless of whether this is a population you plan to work with regularly or not, it is likely several of your future clients will be impacted by care for an elder loved one, later life changes, and the emotional/social significance of aging. The class will be engaging, interactive, and challenging (in a positive way).

TRMA 591 Field Experience in Trauma Response I
1 credit hour. Field Experience represents the culminating project-based experience earning the student the Trauma Response Services post-graduate certificate. During Field Experience, the student will engage in a 9 to 12 month project designed to advance service delivery and/or research related to improving trauma response services. Post-graduate certificate candidates may opt to partner with government or non-government organizations, including the Trauma Response Institute, engaged in research or service delivery projects in progress, or design their own project to be developed and implemented within a designated setting. Students may also opt to collaborate together in the completion of a project as long as each student has clearly identified responsibilities. Successful completion of Field Experience requires completion of the project as detailed in the candidate’s Field Experience Application including a written summary of the project suitable for publication. Students will participate in Field Experience project work groups during the Fall and Spring academic terms as all projects will be completed under the supervision of the Trauma Response Institute director.
Prerequisites: TRMA 500 Introduction to Traumatology and TRMA 501 Basic Skills in Individual and Group Crisis Intervention.
Corequisite: TRMA 581 Legal and Ethical Issues in Trauma Response
.

TRMA 592 Field Experience in Trauma Response II
1 credit hour
. Field Experience represents the culminating project-based experience earning the student the Trauma Response Services post-graduate certificate. During Field Experience, the student will engage in a 9 to 12 month project designed to advance service delivery and/or research related to improving trauma response services. Post-graduate certificate candidates may opt to partner with government or non-government organizations, including the Trauma Response Institute, engaged in research or service delivery projects in progress, or design their own project to be developed and implemented within a designated setting. Students may also opt to collaborate together in the completion of a project as long as each student has clearly identified responsibilities. Successful completion of Field Experience requires completion of the project as detailed in the candidate’s Field Experience Application including a written summary of the project suitable for publication. Students will participate in Field Experience project work groups during the Fall and Spring academic terms as all projects will be completed under the supervision of the Trauma Response Institute director.
Prerequisites: TRMA 500 Introduction to Traumatology, TRMA 501 Basic Skills in Individual and Group Crisis Intervention, and TRMA 591 Field Experience in Trauma Response I. Corequisite: TRMA 582 Field Operations and Incident Command.

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