Advisory Board

A distinguished group of scholars, writers and artists who advise the Honors Director and Honors Committee about the program’s purpose, curriculum and pedagogy.

Donald L. Drakeman

Donald L. Drakeman

Donald L. Drakeman is a Fellow in Health Management at the University of Cambridge, and a Venture Partner with Advent Venture Partners. He is the cofounder of two biotechnology companies that have created new treatments for cancer, and he served as CEO of one of them for many years. He has also been a lecturer in politics at Princeton University, where he taught in the area of civil liberties, and where he has served as chairman of the Advisory Council of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions, and as co-chair of the religion department’s Advisory Council.

He has written extensively on church-state issues, most recently in Church, State, and Original Intent (Cambridge University Press, 2010). He has served as a trustee of Drew University and the University of Charleston, and he is a fellow of the Royal Historical Society and the Society of Biology. He received an AB from Dartmouth College, a JD from Columbia University, and a PhD in religion from Princeton University.

Robert George

Robert George

Robert P. George is McCormick Professor of Jurisprudence and director of the James Madison Program in American Ideals and Institutions at Princeton University. He is a member of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, and has served on the President’s Council on Bioethics and as a presidential appointee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. He was a Judicial Fellow at the Supreme Court of the United States, where he received the Justice Tom C. Clark Award. A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Swarthmore College, he holds degrees in law and theology from Harvard University and a doctorate in philosophy of law from Oxford University, in addition to many honorary degrees.

He is the author or editor of numerous books in the fields of constitutional law, ethics and legal and political philosophy. His articles have appeared in the Harvard Law Review, the Yale Law Journal, the Columbia Law Review, and other leading journals in law, philosophy and political science. He is a recipient of the U.S. Presidential Citizens Medal and the Honorific Medal for the Defense of Human Rights of the Republic of Poland. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, and is Of Counsel to the law firm of Robinson & McElwee. In 1994, he was Counsel of Record to Mother Teresa of Calcutta in her submission to the United States Supreme Court requesting the reversal of Roe v. Wade and the “declaration of the inalienable right to life of the unborn child.”

Eric Gregory

Eric Gregory

Eric Gregory is a professor of religion at Princeton University. He joined the faculty in 2001 and was promoted to professor in 2009. He is the author of Politics and the Order of Love: An Augustinian Ethic of Democratic Citizenship (University of Chicago Press, 2008). His interests include religious and philosophical ethics, theology, political theory, law and religion, and the role of religion in public life. In 2007 he was awarded Princeton's President's Award for Distinguished Teaching. A graduate of Harvard College, he earned an M.Phil. and Diploma in Theology from the University of Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar, and his doctorate in religious studies from Yale University. He has received fellowships from the Erasmus Institute, University of Notre Dame, the Safra Foundation Center for Ethics, Harvard University, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Among his current projects is a book tentatively titled, What Do We Owe Strangers? Globalization and the Good Samaritan, which examines secular and religious perspectives on global justice. Prof. Gregory is currently a fellow at The Tikvah Center for Law & Jewish Civilization at New York University School of Law.

Stanley Hauerwas

Stanley Hauerwas

Stanley Hauerwas is the Gilbert T. Rowe Professor of Theological Ethics at Duke University Divinity School. He has sought to recover the significance of the virtues for understanding the nature of the Christian life. This search has led him to emphasize the importance of the church, as well as narrative for understanding Christian existence. His work cuts across disciplinary lines as he is in conversation with systematic theology, philosophical theology and ethics, political theory, as well as the philosophy of social science and medical ethics.

He was named "America’s Best Theologian" by Time magazine in 2001. Dr. Hauerwas, who holds a joint appointment in Duke Law School, delivered the prestigious Gifford Lectureship at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, in 2001. His book, A Community of Character: Toward a Constructive Christian Social Ethic, was selected as one of the 100 most important books on religion of the 20th century. Dr. Hauerwas is the author of many books, including Matthew: Brazos Theological Commentary on the Bible (Grand Rapids: Brazos Press, 2006) and The State of the University: Academic Knowledges and the Knowledge of God, (Oxford: Blackwell, 2007).

Nannerl O. Keohane

Nan Keohane

Nan Keohane writes and teaches in political philosophy, leadership and feminist theory. She has served as president of Wellesley College (1981-1993) and Duke University (1993-2004). She is the author of Thinking about Leadership (Princeton University Press, 2010), Higher Ground: Ethics and Leadership in the Modern University (Duke University Press, 2006) Philosophy and the State in France (1980) and coedited Feminist Theory: a Critique of Ideology (1981). Keohane has taught at Swarthmore College, the University of Pennsylvania and Stanford University. She is also a member of the Harvard Corporation, and on the board of the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Her current research interests concern leadership and inequality, including gender issues. She earned a BA from Wellesley College, an MA from St Anne’s College, Oxford University, and a PhD from Yale University. Professor Keohane is married to Robert Keohane; they have four children and eight grandchildren.

Wilfred McClay

Wilfred McClay

Wilfred M. McClay is SunTrust Bank Chair of Excellence in Humanities and professor of history at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. He is co-director of the Center for Reflective Citizenship at UTC, and also holds positions as a senior scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C., senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center in Washington, and senior fellow of the Trinity Forum. He was appointed in 2002 to the National Council on the Humanities, the advisory board for the National Endowment for the Humanities, and served in that post until January of 2013.

His book The Masterless: Self and Society in Modern America won the 1995 Merle Curti Award of the Organization of American Historians for the best book in American intellectual history. Among his other books are The Student’s Guide to U.S. History, Religion Returns to the Public Square: Faith and Policy in America, Figures in the Carpet: Finding the Human Person in the American Past, and the forthcoming Why Place Matters: Geography, Identity, and Public Life in Modern America. He has been the recipient of fellowships from the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Academy of Education. McClay was educated at St. John’s College (Annapolis) and the Johns Hopkins University, and has taught at Tulane University, Pepperdine University, the University of Rome, Georgetown University, and the University of Dallas.

David W. Miller

David W. Miller

David is on the faculty of Princeton University, teaching, conducting research, and serving as director of the Princeton University Faith & Work Initiative. His area of focus is business ethics and the role that religious traditions play in shaping and informing leaders' individual and organizational ethics. David also teaches a seminar on Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

David brings a “bilingual” perspective to the academic and business world. Before receiving a PhD in ethics, he spent 16 years in the corporate world, domestically and overseas, holding senior executive positions in international business and finance. He is the author of the critically acclaimed and best-selling book, God at Work: The History and Promise of the Faith at Work Movement. He also serves as an advisor to CEOs and senior executives in matters pertaining to ethics, values, leadership, and faith at work.

Mark Noll

Mark Noll

Mark A. Noll is Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of numerous works, including Protestantism--A Very Short Introduction (Oxford University Press, 2011); Jesus Christ and the Life of the Mind (Eerdmans, 2011), The New Shape of World Christianity: How American Experience Reflects Global Faith (InterVarsity Press, 2009); God and Race in American Politics: A Short History (Princeton University Press, 2008); The Civil War as a Theological Crisis (University of North Carolina Press, 2006); America's God, from Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln (Oxford University Press, 2002); and as coeditor of Religion and American Politics: From the Colonial Period to the Present, 2nd ed. (Oxford University Press, 2007). Noll is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 2006 he received the National Endowment for the Humanities medal at a White House ceremony.

Gina Ochsner

Gina Ochsner

Gina Ochsner graduated from George Fox University in 1992 and earned a master's degree in English from Iowa State University and a master in fine arts from the University of Oregon. She has authored three books: The Russian Dreambook of Color and Flight (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt), People I Wanted to Be (Houghton Mifflin/Mariner), and The Necessary Grace to Fall (University of Georgia Press). Ochsner’s short stories have been featured in The New Yorker magazine, The Best American Nonrequired Reading and Image: Art, Faith, Mystery. She has won more than 20 awards for her writing, including the Flannery O’Connor Award, the Oregon Book Award, and the Pacific Northwest Booksellers Association Book Award.

David Wessner

David Wessner

David Wessner is a Senior Fellow at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health and working on reform in health professional education. He is the former president and CEO of Park Nicollet Health Services, an integrated hospital and clinic system based in St. Louis Park, Minn., where he led an implementation of lean management to advance safety and efficiency. David is past chair of the Minnesota Hospital Association and chair of the Health Care Policy Committee of the Minnesota Business Partnership, where he led legislative efforts to report quality and safety in healthcare. He also is the 2003 recipient of the Distinguished Service Award of the Minnesota Hospital Association and the Medical Pre-eminence Award of the American Medical Group Association. He received his master's degree in health administration from Duke University, and a bachelor of arts in philosophy from Wheaton College.

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