Program Requirements

Overview

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) program consists of a three-year, entry-level professional graduate program that prepares students to be eligible for licensure and entry into contemporary physical therapy practice. The curriculum emphasizes a problem-solving, evidence-based approach to learning in addition to providing a wide variety of clinical experiences that are integrated throughout the program. Our faculty are experts in the areas of manual therapy, orthopedics, biomechanics, research, sports medicine, pediatrics, neuroscience and general physical therapy practice.

Mission

The mission of the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program is to prepare physical therapists to meet the health and wellness needs of their community through innovative practice, passionate commitment, the pursuit of excellence, and generous service.

Accreditation

Effective May 28, 2015, George Fox University has been granted full accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA, 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.orgemail address).

Program Objectives

Professional and Educational Objectives

To enable students to:

  • Function as safe, ethical and autonomous practitioners in a variety of settings
  • Use effective communication skills in all professional relationships including those with patients, colleagues, other health care professionals and families
  • Utilize critical thinking skills and principles of evidence-based practice for making clinical decisions using the patient/client management model
  • Demonstrate both societal and professional responsibility through a commitment to life-long learning, professional development and community service
  • Contribute to the profession as clinicians, researchers, educators, consultants and advocates
  • Apply the concepts of health, wellness, and prevention to promote the best possible function

Admission Requirements

Enrollment is highly competitive and applicants seeking admission to the DPT program must hold a four-year baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25. Applicants must have completed all prerequisite courses with a minimum GPA of 3.25 prior to entry into the program.

Additional admission criteria include knowledge of the physical therapy profession in a variety of settings. This is evaluated by the number of hours spent either observing or working in the field of physical therapy. Although there is no minimum requirement at present, it’s not uncommon to have applicants with well over 100 hours of observation time. Other factors that are included in the admission criteria are letters of recommendation, essay response, content of the application, and service to the community.

Prerequisite Courses

George Fox University offers an exercise science major, which is an interdisciplinary course of study that includes the prerequisites needed for most physical therapy programs. Although there are benefits to completing those courses at George Fox University, this does not guarantee admission into the program. All prerequisite coursework must be completed with a minimum grade of “C”. A general description of prerequisite coursework is listed below.

Anatomy and Physiology: 8 semester credits (or equivalent) required course: human anatomy (with dissection preferred) & physiology. Laboratory sessions are required.

Biological Sciences: 4 semester credits (or equivalent) required courses: Biological sciences can include general biology, neuroscience, genetics, microbiology, advanced anatomy and other upper division classes. Equivalent courses include kinesiology, exercise physiology, and biomechanics.

Physics: 8 semester credits (or equivalent): required course: general physics. The course should reflect a standard two-semester (or equivalent) course which includes a laboratory.

Chemistry: 8 semester credits (or equivalent): required course: general chemistry.  Equivalent courses such as organic & biological chemistry courses should reflect standard two-semesters which include a laboratory. Advanced courses such as organic chemistry, physical chemistry and biochemistry are strongly recommended.

Psychology: 6 semester credits (or equivalent): course should include but not limited to a general course in psychology. Additional coursework in abnormal psychology, human development, and neuroscience are strongly recommended.

Statistics: 2 semester credits (or equivalent): course can be taken as either math or social science credit.

Social Science and Humanities: combined 12 semester credits (or equivalent): required course: English composition. Additional coursework should include classes in more than one discipline such as literature, communication, foreign language, philosophy, sociology, political science, economics, and fine arts. 

Those students whose first language is not English must meet the required English proficiency standard as demonstrated in passing the following minimum international iBT (Internet-based TOEFL) scores: 25 points in each of the following, reading, writing, speaking and listening.

 In addition, applicants must complete the following to be considered for admission to the program:

  • Doctor of Physical Therapy application form and application fee
  • One official transcript from all colleges or universities attended
  • Two references (one academic and one physical therapist; forms provided in the application materials)
  • An in-person interview

The core faculty and the director have the authority for determining the acceptance of specific undergraduate credits that may fall outside the lines of the traditional prerequisites.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credits and transfer students from other physical therapy programs will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Course Requirements

The Doctor of Physical Therapy program is approximately three years in length (29 months) with 92 semester hours of didactic coursework required as a minimum for graduation, as well as 37 weeks of full-time clinical internships. The first year of the program emphasizes didactic study in the scientific foundations and evidence-based practice in physical therapy and includes a 4 week introduction to clinical practice during the summer. Students will integrate their didactic knowledge into clinical practice progressing in complexity as they advance through the program.

Clinical Training

A significant part of the program consists of 37 weeks of full-time clinical training. Integrated throughout all three years of the didactic component is hands-on clinical training in a variety of settings including private practice, hospital acute care, orthopedics, pediatric and rehabilitation facilities. Students should be prepared to participate in clinical internships outside of the Portland metropolitan area during the clinical education portion of the program. During these out-of-area internships (as well as other internships), students are responsible for living and transportation expenses.  

Continuous Enrollment

Students are expected to maintain continuous enrollment throughout the program.

Professional Standards

Standards for graduate education in physical therapy, as well as for the practice of physical therapy, are set by the policies of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) through its Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) and those of the relevant state laws and administrative rules. In Oregon, this includes the Oregon Physical Therapy Licensing Board. The design, structure, and processes of graduate education at George Fox University are influenced by these statutes, accreditation criteria, and policies. Consequently, in addition to the policies of the university's graduate program, students in the physical therapy program are expected to know and abide by the professional standards established by these regulatory agencies. Both faculty and students are expected to adhere to the APTA Code of Ethics and Guide for Professional Conduct (2010).

Graduation Requirements

In order to graduate with a doctor of physical therapy degree students must:

  • Satisfactorily complete a minimum of 129 semester hours with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above
  • Achieve no grade lower than C+ in all but 2 courses. See grading policy for further details.

Grading

The DPT program reserves the right to determine how it defines professional competence and professional behavior, to establish standards of excellence, and to evaluate students. Semester grades are determined by the instructor's evaluation of the student's daily participation in class, performance on periodic tests, work on research papers and class projects, and achievement on final examinations. The DPT program reserves the right to decline or withdraw a student’s admission if the student’s mental health status indicates that such action is essential for the safety of fellow students, faculty, administrative staff, or patients. The DPT program uses the following percentages for grade determination: A = 93-100%, A- = 90-92%, B+ = 87-89%, B = 83-86%, B- = 80-82%, C+ = 77-79%, C = 73-76%, C- = 72-70%, D = 60-69%, F = 59% or below, P = pass, NP = no pass, I = incomplete.

An incomplete (“I”) is given when the student is performing satisfactorily but there may be circumstances beyond the student’s control which resulted in the student not completing all of the assignments within the allotted time. If the incomplete work is not completed in the timeframe outlined by the faculty, the grade will be replaced with an “F”. Students cannot progress to the next sequenced course until the “I” is replaced with a passing grade.  If circumstances arise such that the student is unable to complete the semester they must either apply for a leave of absence, withdraw, or be dismissed

Course grades of D and F are unacceptable and cannot be included as graduate credit and may result in immediate dismissal from the program. Students may appeal grades through the university’s academic appeals process. A student will be also dismissed from the program for the following reasons:

  1. Repeating more than one clinical affiliation
  2. Failure to achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 by the end of the final semester

Clinical Grading

The DCE will assign a grade of “Pass, No Pass or Incomplete” to the clinical education experienced based upon the final APTA web-based Clinical Performance Instrument (CPI) completed by the Clinical Instructor (CI) and student as well as input from the agency CCCE as appropriate. This grade will be determined using the following as a guideline for determining a passing grade. Students are expected to reach the performance by the end of each clinical experience.

-PDPT 580 Beginner to advanced beginner in all criteria
-PDPT 680 Advanced beginner to intermediate in all criteria
-PDPT 780 Intermediate in all criteria
-PDPT 781 Advanced intermediate in all criteria
-PDPT 782 Entry level to above entry level in all criteria

Progression, Retention, Withdrawal, Dismission, and Reapplication

For continued matriculation, promotion, and graduation, Doctor of Physical Therapy students must maintain an average GPA of 3.0. If a student’s GPA falls below 3.0, the student will be placed on academic warning and the Program Director and faculty will consider the student’s potential for continued success. The faculty and Program Director will make recommendations to the course of action to the Dean of the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences. If a student receives a C or C- in a single course, the student will be required to meet with their academic advisor for counseling and/or remediation. If a student receives a C or C- in two designated courses, that student will be subject to academic warning and remediation. The remediation process could take the form of extra written work, retaking examinations (written or lab), or to retaking the course at the consent of the Program Director and faculty. In all circumstances, counseling between the student and academic advisor will be necessary to establish avenues to improve future performance. If a student receives a C or C- in three designated courses, that student may be subject to dismissal.

If a student is not in good academic standing, they may be placed on academic probation or warning, and a recommended course of action for the individual will be made by the Program Director and faculty.  Students will remain on academic probation until the deficiency is corrected. Once corrected, the student will be considered in good academic standing.

Should a student fail a clinic experience, they must remediate the failed clinical experience before progressing on to the next more advanced clinical experience. Remediation programs specific to the clinical education experience are designed and implemented on a case by case basis and are determined by the circumstances that led to the failure. The DCE, Program Director and faculty will decide the most appropriate remediation activity that may include instruction in clinical skills under direct supervision of faculty.

Unprofessional conduct will be remediated through review, oral and written testing on the code of ethics and standards of conduct; mentoring with the students’ advisor or other designated faculty; and/or counseling with faculty possessing behavioral training expertise.

Academic remediation and probation will be assessed each semester or more frequently as needed. The determination of a plan to resolve the deficiencies will be developed by the Program Director and Faculty. If a student is at risk for dismissal, the Faculty and Program Director will make the final determination. The student’s advisor or program director is to notify the student of the concern regarding performance and plan of action for remediation.  Scholastic dishonesty (cheating, falsifying, misrepresentation or plagiarism) are also grounds for academic probation or dismissal from the program.

Upon completion of the remediation activity, the Program Director and Faculty will review the results and determine the outcome of the remediation process. Successful completion of the remediation activity will result in restoration of good academic standing, and a new grade will be assigned. Unsuccessful completion may result in retaking the class, reassignment to another cohort, or dismissal.

Leave of absence

If a student must take a leave of absence from the program due to an illness, accident, or other substantial reason that impairs their ability to continue course work at that time, all incomplete coursework must be completed within two years from the date of their original start. If they are unable to complete the program in that time frame, they will be dismissed from the program.

Expand All

Curriculum Plan

Complete the following:
This course introduces the student to current federal, state and local regulations regarding physical therapy practice. It also introduces the student to the history of the physical therapy profession and the role it has in health care including topics such as professional behavior, learning methods, ethical practice, professional writing and documentation, medical terminology, and functions of an autonomous practitioner. Emphasis is placed on developing effective attitudinal, interpersonal and communication skills within the health care system. Through class lectures and small group discussions students also explore his/her own moral values, teaching, and learning styles. Course also includes faculty directed application of skills and service to the community. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course introduces the student to basic skills necessary for the practice of physical therapy to include taking a history, documentation, body mechanics, goniometry, vital signs, assistive equipment, patient movement and transfers, positioning, patient safety. Additional information includes the effects of inactivity, infection control, total joint arthroplasty and wound care. Principles from the Guide to Physical Therapy Practice are incorporated into the skills. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course covers current theories in normal and abnormal motor development and motor control as it relates to the neuromuscular system. Topics include plasticity, skeletal muscle fatigue, neural mechanisms of muscle strengthening, spinal circuitry, reflexes, spasticity, rigidity, and balance and posture. Changes in motor development and motor control as aging occurs will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This is the first of a two-term intensive course in gross human anatomy. This course includes advanced study of gross human anatomy utilizing cadaver dissection and includes lecture and laboratory sessions. Emphasis is placed on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems. Utilization of additional methodologies such as radiographic, computerized tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging is also included. Emphasis is also placed on head and neck, upper extremity, thorax and abdominal wall including bones, joints, nerves, and connective tissue. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This is the second of a two-term intensive course in gross human anatomy. This course includes advanced study of gross human anatomy utilizing cadaver dissection and includes lecture and laboratory sessions. Emphasis is placed on the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems. Utilization of additional methodologies such as radiographic, computerized tomographic, and magnetic resonance imaging is also included. Emphasis is also placed on spine, pelvis, hip, knee, ankle, and foot, including bones, joints, nerves, and connective tissue. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PDPT 510
This is the first of a two-term course in clinical biomechanics. This course investigates normal and pathological movement based on an understanding of muscle and joint mechanics as well as muscle testing and function. It is also designed to examine basic evaluation and clinical physical therapy skills such as range of motion, manual muscle testing, goniometry, stretching, and palpation. This course also includes medical and surgical management of orthopedic conditions. Kinesiology is studied from a clinical and functional approach and emphasis is placed on the head and neck, upper extremity, thorax and abdominal wall. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This is the second of a two-term course in clinical biomechanics. This course investigates normal and pathological movement based on an understanding of muscle and joint mechanics as well as muscle testing and function. It is also designed to examine basic evaluation and clinical physical therapy skills such as range of motion, stretching, goniometry, manual muscle testing, and palpation. This course also includes medical and surgical management of orthopedic conditions. Kinesiology is studied from a clinical and functional approach and emphasis is placed on the spine, pelvis, hip, knee, ankle, and foot. Additional content such as gait analysis, posture assessment, and scoliosis will also be covered. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PDPT 520
This course includes lecture, small group discussions and simulated patient-client clinical examination. Emphasis is placed on clinical cases and clinical problems using student-centered, problem-based learning format including evidence-based practice objectives. This course introduces the student to evidence-based practice and the process of critical inquiry. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course introduces the student to the fundamentals and essential concepts of neuromuscular function and includes an in-depth study of the anatomical and physiological study of the nervous system. Emphasis is placed on neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neurodevelopment. This course includes topics such as the peripheral and central nervous systems, and the auditory, visual, and vestibular systems and emphasizes disorders commonly found in physical therapy practice. Both acute and chronic pain mechanisms will also be discussed. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course is designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the physiology of pain and inflammation and how it relates to the selection and use of physical agents, mechanical modalities and electrotherapeutic modalities. Students will learn safety and evidence based reasoning for the selection and implementation of modalities. Lectures, small group discussion and hands on lab sessions will include thermal agents, cryotherapy, hydrotherapy, soft tissue mobilization, traction, compression, electrotherapeutic modalities and ultrasound. Students will be introduced to electromyography, nerve conduction, and fire-wire EMG. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course is intended to provide basic patient care and clinical skills such as assistive devices and gait, bed mobility, draping, positioning, transfer training, dynamic stretching, strengthening, and principles of therapeutic exercise progression. Emphasis is placed on patient safety and handling, proper and safe body mechanics, patient communication and documentation for the therapist. This course also introduces the student to patient assessment and treatment through small group interaction, clinically-based studies and case study presentations. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course is a continuation of PDPT 550 and emphasizes the principles of therapeutic exercise progression from the pediatric patient to the geriatric patient while utilizing exercise for injury prevention and reducing functional impairments. Current concepts in fitness evaluation and health education will be discussed. This course also introduces the student to the concepts of wellness and nutrition including education and prevention programs for individuals, groups, and communities. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PDPT 550
This course is intended to provide students with fundamental knowledge of statistical design with emphasis on statistical methodology specific to the biological sciences. Introduction to evidence-based practice that includes question formation and analysis as it relates to current literature and physical therapy practice will also be discussed. The course will also include a review of current statistical models and provide a critical review of published literature with the students beginning to developing their individual or group professional research project. The student will also develop competence in understanding and applying the principles of research into clinical practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course is a study of human physiology starts at the cellular level of function and progresses to looking at the interrelationships between organ systems. Areas stressed are the autonomic nervous, cardiovascular, renal, hematologic, immune, integumentary, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, endocrine, and skeletal systems. In addition the physiologic effects of pregnancy as well as organ histology are covered. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course covers pathophysiology starting with the molecular and cellular processes that result in structural and functional pathophysiologic changes. Topics covered include cell and tissue injury, healing and repair, inflammation, infection, and cancer. Diseases of the endocrine metabolic, gastrointestinal, renal, musculoskeletal, genital, cardio-pulmonary, hematologic, nervous systems over the life-span are covered. Disease definition, incidence, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations and treatment approaches are discussed. Embryology is reviewed and congenital conditions covered. Prerequisite: Admission to the program or authorized by program director
This course is a 4 week full time clinical experience. Students will be under direct supervision of a clinical instructor at an assigned outpatient physical therapy clinic, rehabilitation clinic, or acute care facility. Clinical sites vary in their location and it is the student’s responsibility for travel and living expenses if they occur. Prerequisite: Successful completion of didactic courses in year 1
Complete the following:
This course covers normal human physiology of body systems and students receive instruction and practice skills associated with conditions related to the cardiopulmonary system. Special emphasis is placed on the body systems most directly affected by the practice of physical therapy. This course also applies the basic concepts and techniques in the management of patients with acute and chronic cardiac and pulmonary disorders. The student gains experience in the interpretation of EKG, heart and lung sounds, and hematological and serum chemistry analysis. Students will demonstrate proper techniques in laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This course covers the general principles of pharmacology. This includes pharmacokinetics, how drugs are administered, absorbed, metabolized and excreted by the body, and pharmacodynamics, how the drugs have their effects on cells. For each organ system the pharmacologic treatment of disease processes will be explored, looking at the mechanism of action, indications, adverse effects, and drug interactions of the major drugs commonly used. Impact of different agents on exercise is considered. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This course covers physical therapy examination and intervention for the medical surgical and integumentary systems. Also included are the concepts of the inflammatory process, types and classification of wounds and wound care, patient education and prevention will also be addressed. Medical and surgical interventions of burns, surgical incisions and wounds, as well as other integumentary procedures such as debridement and non-surgical protocols will be discussed. In addition, physical therapy evaluation and treatment procedures for the management of selected systems such as genitourinary, renal, immune, gastrointestinal, and endocrine will also be covered. Client care problems are emphasized with a problem-solving/case-study format. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
Concepts of nutrition, health, and wellness are addressed. Topics include diabetes, heart disease, obesity, with emphasis on prevention and wellness. Clinical nutrition as it relates to post-surgical conditions, chronic illness and disease will also be discussed. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This course is designed to provide an intense study of geriatric physical therapy and related issues. Specific emphasis is given to the normal development process of again, preventative care and management of pathological aging. Additionally, this course includes a holistic approach to the geriatric patient as an active participant in their health care. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This didactic and laboratory-based course requires students to apply principles of motor control and neuroscience to the clinical care of adults with neurologic health conditions resulting from acquired disorders of the central nervous system. Using current evidence, students will engage in a systematic clinical decision-making approach to the physical therapy examination, movement system diagnosis/ prognosis, and management of these individuals. This approach will guide students to integrate their knowledge of a patient’s neurologic health condition with data derived from the patient’s medical history, relevant standardized tests and measures, and functional task analyses, enabling them to develop and evaluate causal hypotheses and generate goals addressing body structure/ function impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Design, progression, and outcomes assessment of the physical therapy plan of care will be considered, guided by current concepts of neuroplasticity and neurotherapeutics. A holistic, interdisciplinary team approach to neurorehabilitation will be emphasized. Prerequisites: Successful completion of year 1 coursework or authorization by Program Director
This didactic and laboratory-based course continues to build on the principles of motor control and neuroscience previously taught, and expands on concepts introduced in PDPT 630. This course will focus on the application of a systematic clinical decision-making approach to the physical therapy care of adults with neurologic health conditions resulting from specific acquired disorders of both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Students will be required to integrate their knowledge of current evidence addressing each neurologic disease / disorder with the patient’s medical history, interdisciplinary examination findings, and results of tests and measures examining body structure / function impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Clinical decisions addressing the areas of examination, movement system diagnosis, goal-setting, design and progression of the physical therapy plan of care, and outcomes assessment will be considered as they relate to each health condition. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PDPT 630
This course is designed to equip the student with the skills necessary to perform a medical screening and differential diagnosis. Lectures and hands on lab sessions will include algorithms for problem solving, systems review of pathology, integration of diagnostic imaging and laboratory testing in diagnosis, palpation and observation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This course addresses the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention of orthopedic/musculoskeletal injuries of the upper and lower extremities. Medical screening and differential diagnosis will also be covered. Students will plan, initiate, develop, and implement appropriate therapeutic treatments including manual techniques, outcome assessment, and patient education. This course will also consist of laboratory sessions where the students must demonstrate techniques under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This course addresses the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention of orthopedic/musculoskeletal injuries of the cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and pelvic regions as well as TMJ. Students will plan, initiate, develop, and implement appropriate therapeutic treatments including manual techniques, outcome assessment, and patient education. This course will also consist of laboratory sessions where the students must demonstrate techniques under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PDPT650
This course covers the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention for individuals with upper and lower limb amputations or impairments requiring external stabilization such as orthotics, splints, or prosthetics. This course will also consist of laboratory sessions where the students must demonstrate techniques under the direct supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
Students receive instruction in the examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis, and intervention of children with musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders. Emphasis will be placed on school-based practice, early intervention, age-specific standardized developmental tests and assessments, and the psychosocial needs of the child and family. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This course is a 6 week full time clinical experience. Students will be under direct supervision of a clinical instructor at an assigned outpatient physical therapy clinic, rehabilitation clinic, or acute care facility. Clinical sites vary in their location and it is the student’s responsibility for travel and living expenses if they occur. Prerequisites: Successful completion of PDPT 580 and preparedness approval
Students receive instruction in the various imaging techniques used in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular disorders including x-ray, computerized tomography, magnetic resonance, ultrasound and radioisotope imaging. The class covers the principles of each technique, discusses the advantages and disadvantages of each and focuses on the clinical interpretation and implications for rehabilitation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 1 or authorized by program director
This course covers issues related to the culture of disability, social and behavioral effects of illness and injury and the influence disability has on families and patients. Issues relating with coping, dying, living with, and acquiring a disability will also be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on the interpersonal relationship between the healthcare provider and the patient and family. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 2 or authorized by program director
In this course students will develop a scholarly professional research project. The professional research project may take the form of: assisting faculty in their on-going research, developing and delivering an educational program for a specific audience, evidence-based clinical research, patient-related outcomes research, and other projects proposed by the student which is agreed upon by their faculty research advisor. Prerequisites: Successful completion of prior coursework or authorized by program director
In this course students will develop a scholarly professional research project. The professional research project may take the form of: assisting faculty in their on-going research, developing and delivering an educational program for a specific audience, evidence-based clinical research, patient-related outcomes research, and other projects proposed by the student which is agreed upon by their faculty research advisor. Prerequisites: Successful completion of prior coursework or authorized by program director
In this course students will develop a scholarly professional research project. The professional research project may take the form of: assisting faculty in their on-going research, developing and delivering an educational program for a specific audience, evidence-based clinical research, patient-related outcomes research, and other projects proposed by the student which is agreed upon by their faculty research advisor. Prerequisites: Successful completion of prior coursework or authorized by program director
This course emphasizes service learning. During this course, the students will identify community needs, develop a service-learning project in conjunction with a community partner, and carry out the project. Ideas related to social responsibility, advocacy and professionalism are explored through class room activities, formal papers, reflective journaling, readings and a final project presentation. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 2 or authorized by program director
Complete the following:
This course introduces students to various aspects of physical therapy practice management. Topics include: demographic analysis and feasibility study, business plan design, contract negotiation, marketing strategies and practice building, daily operations, billing and productivity, liability, personnel management, human resources and community service. Elements unique to private practice, hospital and skilled care facilities will be analyzed. Current topics in government health care policy will be discussed. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 2 or authorized by program director
This course covers professional licensure, comprehensive examination, preparation for the national exam, continuing education requirements, and post-graduate opportunities in teaching and research. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 2 or authorized by program director
In this course students will complete a scholarly professional research project. The professional research project may take the form of: assisting faculty in their on-going research, developing and delivering an educational program for a specific audience, evidence-based clinical research, patient-related outcomes research, and other projects proposed by the student which is agreed upon by their faculty research advisor. Students are expected to successfully pass and defend the professional research project. Prerequisites: Successful completion of prior coursework or authorized by program director
Students receive instruction in topics of current interest and provide advanced study in specific areas such as running, orthotics, casting and bracing for pediatrics, 3-D motion analysis, footwear design, endurance training, athletic taping, educational strategies, fatigue, and other areas related to physical therapy. Prerequisites: Successful completion of coursework year 2 or authorized by program director
This course is an 8 week full time clinical experience. Students will be under direct supervision of a clinical instructor at an assigned outpatient physical therapy clinic, rehabilitation clinic, pediatric facility, or acute care facility. Clinical sites vary in their location and it is the student’s responsibility for travel and living expenses if they occur. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PDPT 680 and preparedness approval
This course is a 9 week full time clinical experience. Students will be under direct supervision of a clinical instructor at an assigned outpatient physical therapy clinic, rehabilitation clinic, pediatric facility, or acute care facility. Clinical sites vary in their location and it is the student’s responsibility for travel and living expenses if they occur. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PDPT 780
This course is a 10 week full time clinical experience. Students will be under direct supervision of a clinical instructor at an assigned outpatient physical therapy clinic, rehabilitation clinic, pediatric facility, or acute care facility. Clinical sites vary in their location and it is the student’s responsibility for travel and living expenses if they occur. Prerequisite: Successful completion of PDPT 781