Table of Contents

The Administration of George Fox University

The University Administration

The President of the University

The President is the chief executive officer of the university elected by the Board of Trustees and charged with the authority to operate the university according to the policies set by the Board. The President represents the Board to the faculty and staff. The President is also responsible, in cooperation with the Board of Trustees, for securing needed operational and developmental funds, presenting the annual budget and recommending it to the Board of Trustees, assigning and supervising the duties of the executive administrative officers of the university and determining whether the duties are properly performed, and assuming leadership for the spiritual life of the campus.

 

The Executive Officers of the University

Executive Officers of the University chart

The Executive Leadership Team

In an effort to effectively coordinate a variety of strategic and operational decisions at George Fox University, the President relies on a group of executive officers for advice and counsel. This group, designated the “Executive Leadership Team,” is composed of the President, the Provost, the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, the Vice President for Student Life, the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing, Vice President for Innovation and Empowerment, and the Vice President of Advancement. The Executive Leadership Team provides counsel to the President on the direction of the university and helps the President consider important university-wide issues, including the development and implementation of university plans and initiatives.

The Provost

The Provost is appointed by the President in consultation with the Board of Trustees and is responsible for the administration of the graduate and undergraduate academic programs of the university. The Provost, with the aid of the Associate Provost for Local and Global Engagement, Associate Provost for Professional Programs, and Associate Provost for Liberal Arts provides oversight to academic programs, the library, the IDEA Center, Center for Study Abroad, Assessment and Institutional Research, Student Success, Student Learning Support Services, Grants, Diversity and the Center for Peace and Justice. In the absence of the President, the Provost assumes the necessary authority and responsibility for university governance purposes. The Provost serves as the chief advisor to the President in matters of university policy, particularly in academic affairs; works directly with the President in faculty personnel issues; supervises the Associate Provosts and Academic Deans; leads the faculty in designing and refining a meaningful academic program; and appoints faculty members to committees in consultation with the Faculty Senate. The Provost serves as an ex officio member of all faculty committees.

The Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

The Chief Financial Officer is appointed by the President in consultation with the Board of Trustees and is the administrative officer responsible for the business and financial operations of the university. The Vice President and Chief Financial Officer assists the President in the general administration of the university and in preparation of the annual budget; serves to ensure that the university operates within the budget parameters set by the Board of Trustees; serves as the chief budget officer; acts as custodian of the securities, contracts, title deeds, and other documents evidencing the physical assets and liabilities of the university; supervises the insurance programs of the university; conserves and strengthens the assets of the university; coordinates the auxiliary enterprises of the university; and submits to the President an annual report giving a full and complete accounting of all the assets of the university. Administrative units reporting to The Vice President and Chief Financial Officer include financial services, plant services, print and mail services, student accounts and the Portland Center.

The Vice President for Student Life

The Vice President for Student Life is appointed by the President in consultation with the Board of Trustees and is the chief student life officer. He or she reports directly to the President. This person serves as the chief advisor to the President and Provost in matters of student life policies and issues of concern. The Vice President for Student Life, who also serves as the Title IX Coordinator, is responsible for a variety of administrative units, including campus safety and security, student activities and programming, student recreation, intercollegiate athletics, intercultural and international student services/programs, residence life and housing, commuter programs, health and counseling services, spiritual life programs, and parent programs.

The Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing

The Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing is appointed by the President in consultation with the Board of Trustees and is the administrative officer responsible for interpreting the university to its various constituencies. Reporting directly to the President, the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing plans and executes annual strategies to market the university; is responsible for developing strategic recruitment, enrollment related policies/procedures and working with the Vice President & Chief Financial Officer to ensure that institutional enrollment goals and revenue forecasts are met and operating within federal regulations for financial aid and academic records, including FERPA (Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974). Administrative units reporting to the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing include admissions, international recruitment, registrar, alumni communication, financial aid, and marketing communications.

The Vice President for Advancement

The Vice President for Advancement is appointed by the President in consultation with the Board of Trustees and is responsible for the leadership, management and implementation of the strategic plan to raise funds and foster relationships and partnerships with alumni, parents, and the greater community in support of the university's mission. The VP leads the fund development team and collaborates with deans and leaders to form partnerships and support their fundraising efforts. She or he supports the President and the Board of Trustees in their work to raise money for the university.

 

 

Academic Leadership Team

Academic Leadership Team organizational chart

The Provost employs an Academic Leadership Team to aid in the task of academic management and governance. Presently, the University is divided into two broad sectors for governance purposes: graduate and adult degree programs, and traditional undergraduate programs. The academic officers include the following:

The Associate Provost for Local and Global Engagement & Chief Diversity Officer

The Associate Provost for Local and Global Engagement & Chief Diversity Officer is appointed by the Provost in consultation with the faculty and must hold a terminal academic degree. He or she provides overall leadership for institutional diversity initiatives, Center for Peace and Justice, Center for Study Abroad, assessment and institutional research, faculty development, student success and the IDEA Center. The Associate Provost for Local and Global Engagement & Chief Diversity Officer works closely with the Deans of each college and the VP for Student Life to support faculty in teaching, scholarship, service and the integration of faith in their university work. In addition, the Associate Provost for Local and Global Engagement & Chief Diversity Officer works with leaders across the institution on matters of diversity and represents George Fox University to appropriate external constituencies.

The Associate Provost for Student Academic Success & Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

The Associate Provost for Student Academic Success & Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences is appointed by the Provost in consultation with the faculty and must hold a terminal academic degree. He or she provides overall leadership for the management of academic programs in the arts, humanities and social sciences as well as for programs and initiatives related to student academic success, including student learning support services and the English Language Institute.  In addition, the Associate Provost & Dean of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences represents George Fox University to appropriate external constituencies and works to ensure excellence in all academic programming.

The Dean of the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences & Associate Provost for Professional Preparation

The Dean of the College of Behavioral and Health Sciences & The Associate Provost for Professional Preparation is appointed by the Provost in consultation with the faculty and must hold a terminal academic degree. He or she provides overall leadership for the management of academic programs in the behavioral and health sciences. To accomplish this task, the Dean of Behavioral and Health Sciences & Associate Provost for Professional Preparation works closely with department chairs and program directors in managing the budget, charting faculty loads, and coordinating a strategic design for the identification and recruitment of appropriate full-time and part-time faculty. In addition, the Dean of Behavioral and Health Sciences & Associate Provost for Professional Preparation oversees the Director of Grants Administration, the core theme addressing professional preparation, and represents George Fox University to appropriate external constituencies and works to ensure excellence in all academic programming.

The Dean of the College of Education

The Dean of the College of Education is appointed by the Provost in consultation with the faculty and must hold a terminal academic degree. He or she provides overall leadership for the management of graduate and undergraduate education programs and the Graduate School of Counseling. The Dean of the College of Education works closely with the program directors in managing the budget, determining faculty loads, and coordinating a strategic plan for the identification and recruitment of appropriate full- time and part-time faculty. In addition, the Dean of the College of Education represents George Fox University to appropriate external constituencies and works to ensure excellence in all programming.

The Dean of the College of Business

The Dean of the College of Business is appointed by the Provost in consultation with the faculty and must hold a terminal academic degree. He or she provides leadership for the management of graduate and undergraduate business programs. The Dean of the College of Business works closely with the undergraduate and graduate program directors in managing the budget, determining faculty loads, and coordinating a strategic plan for the identification and recruitment of appropriate full-time and part-time faculty. The Dean of the College of Business subsequently provides recommendations on faculty hires to the President and the Provost. In addition, the Dean of the College of Business represents George Fox University to appropriate external business constituencies and works to ensure excellence in all business programming.

The Vice President and Dean of Portland Seminary and the College of Christian Studies

The Vice President and Dean of Portland Seminary and the College of Christian Studies is appointed by the President in consultation with the Provost, reports directly to the Provost, and must hold a terminal academic degree. He or she is responsible for the overall administration of the seminary, with special attention to the seminary’s academics, including overseeing its faculty and curriculum, maintaining academic relationships with constituent denominations and their churches, promoting seminary advancement as determined by the President, and acting as the principal liaison with the Association of Theological Schools. In addition, The Vice President and Dean of Portland Seminary and the College of Christian Studies works closely with the undergraduate chairs and graduate program directors in managing the budget, determining faculty loads, and coordinating a strategic plan for the identification and recruitment of appropriate full-time and part-time faculty. She or he subsequently provides recommendations on faculty hires to the President and the Provost. The Vice President and Dean of Portland Seminary and the College of Christian Studies works with the Board of Trustees through the Seminary Board of Regents and the Academic Affairs Committee of the Board of Trustees.

The Dean of the College of Engineering

The Dean of the College of Engineering is appointed by the Provost in consultation with the faculty and must hold a terminal academic degree. He or she provides overall leadership for the management of academic programs in engineering, mathematics, computer science, biology, chemistry and physics. To accomplish this task, the Dean of Engineering works closely with department chairs in managing departmental matters, provides direction on department budgets, charts faculty loads, and coordinates with department chairs a strategic design for the identification and recruitment of appropriate full-time and part-time faculty. In addition, the Dean of Engineering represents George Fox University to appropriate external constituencies and works to ensure excellence in all academic programming.

The Dean of Libraries

The Dean of Libraries is appointed by the Provost in consultation with faculty. He or she provides overall leadership and management of university libraries including educational technology and archives. The Dean of Libraries works closely with librarians, director of educational technology, university archivist, and staff to manage and allocate budget resources; develop and implement the strategic plan; and evaluate the effectiveness of the collections, facilities, services, and instruction. In addition, the Dean of the Libraries represents George Fox University to appropriate external constituencies, including serving on the Council for the Orbis Cascade Alliance.

Associate Dean for Liberal Arts & Director, William Penn Honors Program

The Associate Dean for Liberal Arts & Director, William Penn Honors Program, provides strategic management and intellectual leadership for the liberal arts foundation of the undergraduate program. This includes leadership of all aspects of the William Penn Honors College, as well as general oversight of the undergraduate general education program.

The Associate Dean for Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

The Associate Dean for Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences supports the work of the Dean of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences in ensuring quality, viability, and assessment of college programs. This includes assisting with planning and budgeting, as well as faculty hiring and professional development. As appropriate, the Associate Dean also represents the College and University in external community engagement efforts.

 

University-Wide Program Directors

Director, Assessment and Institutional Research

The Director of Assessment and Institutional Research is charged with coordinating the assessment of all academic programs at the university and assists in developing self-study reports for accreditation purposes. The Director of Assessment and Institutional Research serves as chair of the University Assessment Committee and reports to the Provost.

The Director of the Center for Peace and Justice

(Currently in the office of the Associate Provost for Local and Global Engagement & Chief Diversity Officer)

The Director of the Center for Peace and Justice works with on-campus programs that help students and faculty to become better informed about peace and justice issues and global concerns. The Director coordinates the annual Woolman Peacemaking Forum and the Global Issues Forum. The Director reports to the Provost.

The Director of the Center for Study Abroad

The Director of the Center for Study Abroad, along with the Study Abroad Committee, sets policies regarding the programs to which George Fox University sends students for semester-long studies, including the selection of students for these programs. The Director studies the feasibility of George Fox University-sponsored semester-long programs off campus. The Director is the liaison between the partnerships of various international universities and George Fox University. All George Fox University juniors are given the opportunity to travel abroad with a faculty member to study and experience another culture. The Director provides curricular direction and budget oversight for the Juniors Abroad program. The Director reports directly to the Associate Provost for Local and Global Engagement & Chief Diversity Officer but works collaboratively with the academic leaders on campus to accomplish the mission of the program.

The Director of the IDEA Center - Career and Academic Planning

The Director of the IDEA Center oversees career and academic planning focused on helping students strategically plan and complete both their formal academic efforts and their internship/field experiences in ways that maximize their career outcomes. The Director is keenly aware of today’s current corporate and non-profit marketplace in order to grow and advance a strategic roadmap, equipping students to successfully transition into today’s workforce. The Director also works in collaboration with the Alumni and Parent Relations Offices to increase involvement in preparing students for their job search and expanding internship and career opportunities. The Director and IDEA Center Coaches collaborate with academic departments to incorporate career pathway presentations and manage the internship for credit approval process. (IDEA - Coaching students to INITIATE the next steps toward their future goals, DISCOVER their vocational calling, ENGAGE in academic and experiential opportunities, so they can ACHIEVE exceptional life outcomes.)

Organization of Academic Programs

College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Department of Art and Design

Department of Communication, Journalism and Cinematic Arts

Department of English and Theatre

Department of History, Sociology, and Politics

Department of Music

Department of World Languages and Applied Linguistics

 

College of Behavioral and Health Sciences

Department of Health and Human Performance

School of Nursing

Department of Psychology

School of Social Work

Graduate School of Clinical Psychology

Graduate School of Physical Therapy

Doctor of Medical Science Program (Physician Assistant/PA) 

 

College of Business

Department of Undergraduate Business and Economics

Masters of Business Administration Program (MBA)

Doctor of Business Administration Program (DBA)

 

College of Christian Studies, Liberal Arts, and Honors

College of Christian Studies

William Penn Honors Program

General Education Program

 

College of Education

School of Education

Department of Graduate Teaching and Leading

Graduate School of Counseling

 

College of Engineering

Department of Mathematics and Applied Science

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Department of Mechanical and Civil Engineering

Department of Biology

Department of Chemistry

 

Portland Seminary

Doctor of Ministry Program

Masters Programs

Certificate Programs

 

Department of Professional Studies

 

Department Chairs and Program Directors

Leadership

Department or school chairs and program directors serve in important leadership capacities. They lead the faculty in developing a strategic plan and ensure that the plan is updated regularly. They seek to motivate faculty members toward excellence in teaching and scholarship. They convene the faculty for planning, business, and social interaction. They help faculty members find the resources they need for scholarly work, both within the university and from other sources. They ensure that faculty are providing helpful advising and mentoring to students in their classes and in the majors offered by the department, and work with the Director of Institutional Assessment to ensure the assessment of the program.

Program Development

Department chairs and program directors develop proposals for curriculum innovations and changes and take these through the approval process outlined in this handbook. They serve on the Undergraduate and/or Graduate Coordinating Council to give general oversight to undergraduate and/or graduate academic policies in general. They express the perspective of their departments in the senate or faculty meetings as appropriate.

Management

Department chairs and program directors manage departmental operating budgets, authorizing expenditures within the budget. They develop budgets, loads, schedules, and catalog copy on a timely basis, in consultation with the academic administration staff. They ensure that faculty members have the materials they need for their teaching, within budget limitations. They evaluate faculty members in their departments annually. They supervise departmental support staff. They ensure that student employees assigned to the department are carefully selected, are appropriately assigned, and are supervised.

Mentoring

The department chairs and program directors provide encouragement, suggestions, and help to faculty in their departments, especially to new faculty. They serve as a mentor and model of a mature spiritual life, and care for the spiritual formation of students and faculty, particularly with the integration of faith and knowledge.

 

University Governance

University Standing Committees

Aesthetics Committee

The Aesthetics Committee develops and maintains a consistent and coordinated university image through campus aesthetics. Chair and membership appointed by the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing.

Behavior Intervention Team (Campus Response Team)

This team responds in appropriate and timely manner to individuals or groups who are perceived as a threat. Chair and membership appointed by the Vice President for Student Life. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President for Student Life.

Bias Incident Team

This team responds appropriately to bias incidents on GFU campuses. Chair and membership appointed by the Vice President for Student Life. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President for Student Life.

Brandt Art Fund Committee

The Brandt Art Committee manages and maintains the GFU art collection, exhibits and visiting artists, establishing the guiding philosophy and governance for the collection, coordinating with the university community on art selection and placement, and overseeing the Art Collection budget. Reports to the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Co-Curricular Team

The Co-Curricular Team reviews the quality of the student experience and makes recommendations to ensure the university provides services and co-curricular opportunities contributing to an excellent and meaningful educational experience that is consistent with the university's mission, values, goals and priorities. The team reviews and monitors existing policies, programs and services, and evaluates proposed changes or additions for athletics & intramurals, food services, Housing, Resident Life, Community Accountability, Student Leadership, First Year Experience, Multicultural Programs, International Student Services, Act Six, Spiritual Life, Health & Counseling, Career Services, Campus Security, Academic Resource Center/Writing Center, Disability Services, and the Academic Success Program. Chair and membership appointed by the Vice President for Student Life. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President for Student Life.

Core Themes Team

Core Theme teams review data associated with their core theme objectives and make recommendations based on their data analysis. There are four teams: the Liberal Arts Foundation Core Theme Team; the Professional Preparation Core Theme Team; the Christ-centered Community Core Theme Team; and the Local and Global Engagement Core Theme Team. Core Theme teams report to the Provost.

Creation Core Committee

The Creation Care Committee reviews ways in which the university can reduce waste, recycle more, lower its carbon footprint and create positive environmental change on campus. Reports to the Provost.

Crisis Management Team

The Critical Incident Response Team prepares for, and responds to, large scale emergencies affecting the GFU community. Chair and membership appointed by the Vice President for Student Life. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President for Student Life.

Employee Council

The Employee Council is dedicated to building unity between faculty, staff, and administration, representing employee concerns, and increasing employee satisfaction and longevity. This committee is primarily a policy and recommending group, creating a place for all employees to process and suggest solutions to unique concerns or problems, which impact the broad GFU community. The EC members include 3 staff, 3 faculty and 3 administrators, some of which are appointed by other committees. Chair selected by the members. One staff and one faculty member are appointed by the Staff Development Committee and Faculty Senate, respectively. Other members are appointed by the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing in consultation with the Provost. Reports to the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing.

 

Facilities Committee

The Facilities Committee reviews ongoing campus facility needs, makes recommendations, considers space usage, establishes priorities, and manages long range planning issues. Chair and membership appointed by Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. At least one faculty senator will be a member of this committee. Reports to the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

ADA Sub-Committee

The ADA Sub-Committee makes recommendations for the continual upgrading of campus facilities to meet the needs of disabled students, staff and guests. Chair and membership appointed by Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Financial Aid Committee

The Financial Aid Committee reviews suggested policy changes involving institutional aid and considers appeals from students who have not been making Satisfactory Academic Progress. Chair and membership appointed by Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Institutional Diversity Committee

The Institutional Diversity Committee provide strategic direction in developing and overseeing initiatives furthering institutional diversity efforts. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost.

 

Safety Committee

The Safety Committee works to meet OSHA regulations, establishes accident investigation procedures, reviews all accidents and recommends preventative action, establishes employee reporting processes for hazards, evaluates safety accountability, and recommends improvements. Chair and membership appointed by Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Security Committee

The Security Committee collaborates across departments whose work interfaces on security issues; reviews security systems, policies and initiatives. Chair and membership appointed by the Vice President for Student Life. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President for Student Life.

Staff Development Committee

The Staff Development Committee sponsors activities and an annual conference to promote personal growth, professional development, and community amongst the university staff. Chair appointed by the Staff Development Committee. Membership voted annually by the university staff. Reports to the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing.

Student Life Appeals Board

This Board hears appeals from students who have been suspended. Reports to the Provost and Vice President for Student Life.

Student Support Network

The Student Support Network identifies struggling students and provides timely intervention. Chair and membership appointed by the Vice President for Student Life. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Vice President for Student Life.

Technology Advisory Team

The Technology Advisory Team (TAT) is responsible for strategic and budgetary technology decisions, primarily through review and approval of proposals from the Hybrid Learning Program Team (HLPT) and Fox Administrative Systems Team (FAST). The most active area is technology life cycle and computer replacement. Chair and membership appointed by the Provost and Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in consultation with the Chief Information Officer. Reports to the Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Fox Administrative Systems Team (FAST) Sub-Committee

This sub-committee of the TAT provides PeopleSoft systems integration leadership to ensure data integrity for all university business functions, including maintenance, upgrades and several areas not clearly “owned” by another department (E-announcements, the university calendar, etc). Chair and membership appointed by the Executive Director of IT. Faculty representation appointed by the Provost. Reports to the Technology Advisory Team.

Hybrid Learning Program team (HLPT) Sub-Committee

This sub-committee reviews administrative and academic technology supporting faculty and students in enrollment and instruction; tracks innovations and advises ATAT and TAT on requirements and projections; oversees implementation of technical solutions, including system upgrades and providing ongoing faculty development. Reports to the Technology Advisory Team.

University Budget and Operations Team

The University Budget and Operations Team reviews budget proposals and makes recommendations on major decision items, discusses short- and long-term budget issues impacting the entire university. Topics may include the allocation of resources for staffing, salaries, benefits, program budgets, fixed equipment needs, and facility improvements. The team also reviews and recommends new academic proposals in the early stages of development, providing an indication of administrative support. Chair and membership appointed by the President. Faculty representation appointed in consultation with the Provost. Reports to the President.

 

Faculty Governance and Voice

Responsibilities

In light of the longstanding commitment to shared governance in higher education, the faculty has a responsibility to participate in the oversight of the academic program of the university, built upon careful attention to consistent communication among the faculty, administration, and other participants in university life.

Values

George Fox University seeks to reflect in its faculty governance and voice the following values:
  • Community ownership of programs and policies – Academic policies and programs should have the input, support and encouragement of the community as a whole.
  • Mutual accountability – Faculty members are responsible to each other for academic integrity and stewardship of resources.
  • Access and participation – All faculty members, regardless of official position, possess judgment and insight potentially useful in decision-making.
  • Transparency and communication – Trust is fostered through public decision-making and dissemination of information.
  • Respect for the integrity and efforts of individual faculty members and academic subunits – Individuals and subunits should be free to do what they do without unduly onerous review. It is presumed that individuals and subunits act with integrity and competence.
  • Efficiency and timeliness – proposals should be addressed in a timely manner.
  • Spiritual openness – The purpose of any decision-making process is discerning God’s will.
  • Quaker distinctives – Quakers have developed distinctive approaches to organizational life that are worth preserving and enhancing.
  • In accordance with the George Fox University Blueprint for Diversity and the Theology of Racial and Ethnic Diversity statement, we are convinced faculty deliberations are richer and fairer when conducted in groups that represent diversity.

Discerning the Sense of the Meeting

General guidelines
  • Faculty decisions are made in keeping with Quaker understandings that conducting business is best done in a spirit of worship.
  • The central goal is discerning Christ’s leading.
  • While the process comes from Quaker tradition, it is based on convictions all Christians share, that Christians are to seek and follow God’s will and that this process is as important as making timely decisions.
The process
  • The Clerk invites whoever initiated an agenda item to present the matter to the group.
  • The group discusses the issue in a prayerful spirit of listening for God’s voice.
  • When the Clerk senses that the group has come to agreement on God’s leading in the matter, the Clerk offers a tentative expression of that agreement
  • If anyone, after prayerful discernment, disagrees that the Clerk’s statement expresses the group’s sense of God’s leading, the matter may be discussed further, delegated for further consideration, and/or held over to a future meeting.
  • When the group generally affirms that the Clerk has accurately stated its sense of God’s leading, the sense of the meeting is recorded in a minute.
Responsibilities of the Clerk during the discussion
  • Help the members continue to focus on God’s leading, possibly pausing for prayer, oral or silent, when it would be helpful.
  • Draw out those who might contribute to the discussion but might not offer to speak.
  • Help those who are inclined to dominate discussions to be more careful to listen.
  • Help members distinguish among preferences, convictions, and God’s present leading.
  • Remind members that the goal is hearing God’s voice, not arriving at unanimity. Action may be taken in spite of opposition, as long as the concerns of dissenters have been respectfully heard and the group generally affirms a common sense of God’s leading.
Expectations for those attending or participating in meetings
  • Those attending any meeting of a faculty body are asked to do so prayerfully, in a loving attitude of supporting, investing in, and learning from the university Community

Faculty Senate

Mandate

  • The Faculty Senate serves as the voice of the faculty in any matter of faculty
  • The Senate is the decision-making body with respect to academic programs and policies, including but not limited to:
    • New degrees, including degrees offered in academic programs where they have not been previously offered
    • New majors
    • Substantial changes in delivery systems
    • Periodic reviews of degree programs, delivery systems, and majors
    • Changes in undergraduate general education
    • Changes in academic support and enhancement programs
    • Changes in policies affecting the academic life of students, including their integration of faith and learning
    • Approval of graduates
    • Actions requiring approval by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities or other accrediting bodies
    • Proposed changes in the Faculty Handbook
    • Faculty compensation, including proposed additions to faculty contractual obligations
    • Approval of the membership of faculty committees and appointment of chairs in consultation with the Provost
    • Any other matter of faculty concern

 

Operations

  • The Senate convenes at its own call or the call of the Faculty Clerk, the Faculty Council, the Provost, or the President.
  • The Senate can convene in any of three configurations:
    • As an entire Senate, involving all its members
    • As an Undergraduate Senate dealing with undergraduate curriculum and other matters of undergraduate concern.
    • As a Graduate Senate dealing with graduate concerns, including major decisions regarding program and curriculum. (Other matters of graduate program and curriculum are decided by the Academic Leadership Team.)
  • The Faculty Clerk presides over the full Senate. The Undergraduate Faculty Clerk presides over the Undergraduate Senate, and the Graduate Faculty Clerk presides over the Graduate Senate.
  • Actions within the authority of the convened configuration of the Senate, taken with at least half the members of that configuration present either physically or electronically, have the imprimatur of the entire Senate.
  • Any configuration of the Senate can call a meeting of the corresponding faculty -- the Undergraduate Senate convening the undergraduate faculty, the Graduate Senate convening the graduate faculty, and the full Senate convening the entire faculty. The corresponding Clerk presides over each configuration of the faculty meeting.
  • Agendas are established jointly by the relevant Clerk and the Provost, either of whom can insist on the inclusion of agenda items.
  • The Senate operates by seeking the sense of the meeting concerning God’s leading. Its actions are minuted unless they are confidential.

 

Election of Members and Officers

Faculty senators are elected for three-year terms. Each college will be allotted senate seats based upon the FTE of full-time and part-time faculty contracts issued in the spring of odd- numbered years. Faculty contracts are determined by the AAO as “undergraduate”, “graduate”, or “both”. All contracts identified, as “both” shall be divided evenly between graduate and undergraduate. University Library faculty contracts are considered as “both” for the calculation of senate seat allotments. Undergraduate senate seats are calculated by dividing a college’s total undergraduate FTE by 7 and then rounding up to the next whole number (e.g. for 9 faculty, 9 / 7 = 1.29. rounding up results in 2 senate seats). Graduate senate seats are calculated in the same manner.

The Senate also includes the following officers:
  • Faculty Clerk, elected to a two-year term in odd-numbered years, by the entire faculty.
  • Faculty Representative, elected to a two-year term in even- numbered years, by the entire faculty.
  • An Undergraduate Faculty Clerk, elected to a one-year term by the undergraduate faculty.
  • A Graduate Faculty Clerk, elected to a one-year term by the graduate faculty.

Only faculty members on a regular faculty contract who teach half time or more may serve as members of the Senate or participate in elections or Senate meetings. Except for Senate Officers, undergraduate faculty may not be members of the graduate senate, and vice versa.

Senate seats are re-evaluated and re-distributed based upon a college’s FTE every even spring to take effect the following fall. In the event that a college loses a seat in a re-evaluation year, that college is responsible for eliminating that seat at the end of the academic year. In the event that a college adds a seat in a re-evaluation year, the Faculty clerk will determine an initial term length for that seat to ensure that roughly one-third of the senate seats expire each year.

Elections are conducted with the goal of giving each member of the faculty equal voice in nominating and electing the Senate and its Officers. To that end,

  • Any Senate Officers not seeking re-election serve as election officers overseeing the annual faculty elections.
  • The Faculty Clerks are required to have had experience as a faculty senator.
  • The standard method for handling a faculty election includes:
    • Confidential nominations submitted in private to the election officers, who communicate confidentially with the potential nominee to provide an opportunity to accept or decline.
    • Secret ballots administered, collected, and counted by the election officers.

Amendments

The Faculty Senate can amend sections of the Faculty Handbook relating to faculty governance and voice by the approval of the full Faculty Senate. If the amendment only affects the graduate or the undergraduate faculty, that portion of the Senate can act for the full Senate. The Senate can choose to refer the matter to the appropriate faculty meeting(s).

 

The Faculty Academic Governance Committees

Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

The Undergraduate Curriculum Committee receives, studies, and considers curricular changes set forth by undergraduate departments. The committee also advocates, on behalf of the university, that curricular changes both reflect and correspond with the university mission. This committee will have at least one representative from each college, a faculty representative from the library, one representative from the Registrar, IDEA Center and AAO. The Undergraduate Clerk is also a member of this committee. Chair and membership recommended by the Provost in consultation with the Deans and approved by the Undergraduate Senate. If a faculty member needs to be replaced, their college will choose a replacement, which will be placed on the Undergraduate Senate consent agenda.

Undergraduate Policies and Procedures Committee

This committee reviews and approves all undergraduate academic policies and procedures affecting academic quality and credit; responsible for policy changes to the annual undergraduate catalog. This committee recommends actionable items about governance, process, handbook, elections, communication processes, etc, for discussion on the senate floor. It will have at least one representative from each college, a faculty representative from the library, one representative from the Registrar’s Office. Chair and membership recommended by the Provost in consultation with the Deans and approved by the Undergraduate Senate. If a faculty member needs to be replaced, their college will choose a replacement, which will be placed on the Senate consent agenda.

Undergraduate Finance Committee

The Finance Committee interacts with the CFO and Provost to provide advice on undergraduate faculty finance issues.  This includes but is not limited to considering the financial viability of undergraduate curricular proposals.  The Finance Committee receives, studies, and considers curricular changes set forth by undergraduate departments and provides advice to the senate on the proposal’s cost and plan for financing. This committee will have at least one representative from each college.  The CFO and Provost are also members.  Chair and membership recommended by the Provost in consultation with the Deans and approved by the Undergraduate Senate. If a faculty member needs to be replaced, their college will choose a replacement, which will be placed on the Senate consent agenda.

Undergraduate Strategic Planning Committee

The strategic planning committee exists to interface with the President regarding all strategic planning matters involving the undergraduate faculty. This committee is comprised of the Provost, the President and at least one representative from each college. Chair and membership recommended by the Provost in consultation with the Deans and approved by the Undergraduate Senate. If a faculty member needs to be replaced, their college will choose a replacement, which will be placed on the Senate consent agenda.

General Education Committee (GE)

The General Education Committee serves as a study and recommendation committee for the overall general education curriculum. They determine the criteria and recommend to the faculty courses for inclusion in GE, review and determine if current courses are meeting GE objectives, and carry out the work of providing a cohesive curriculum. The GE Committee is responsible for reviewing and providing feedback for all proposals for changes to the general education offerings. The Committee works in partnership with the Director of Institutional Assessment and the academic departments to identify measurable learning outcomes and assessments. This committee will have two representatives from the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, one representative from each of the other colleges, a faculty representative from the library, a representative from the Registrar and IDEA center and a representative of the Office of Academic Affairs. If a faculty member needs to be replaced, their college will choose a replacement, which will be placed on the Senate consent agenda.

Graduate and Adult Degree Policies and Procedures Committee

This committee makes recommendations on policies and procedures impacting adult degree, graduate, and professional programs. Chair and membership chosen by the Provost and approved by the Senate.

College Faculty Meetings

Colleges are free to hold meetings of their faculty for the purpose of business, fellowship, and communication. If a college meets regularly, minutes should be taken and sent to the Office of the Provost and reported to the faculty. Colleges are free to invite other colleges to a meeting when deemed appropriate. College Deans are free to hold meetings with departmental leaders for the purpose of business, fellowship, and communication. If a college meets regularly as a Dean’s Council, minutes should be taken and sent to the Academic Affairs Office, and reported to the faculty. Normally a college’s Dean’s Council is composed of department chairs.

The Academic Leadership Team

The Academic Leadership Team serves as the primary policy-making group for academic issues not directly covered in the faculty handbook, the senior management team for all academic units and programs, the second level governance approval group for all new graduate academic program and curriculum proposals, and the team charged with setting the strategic agenda for the faculty.

 

Appointed Faculty Committees

The following committees operate as faculty committees by conducting business consistent with the faculty responsibility to oversee the curriculum and academic policies of the university, and by working with other administrative units of the university to coordinate their duties and visions with the academic programs. Thus committees become very important in giving opportunity for full discussion and fact- finding before presentation to the faculty senate and final action.

General procedures for committees are as follows:

  • Members are appointed by the Office of Academic Affairs in consultation with the Senate and must be approved by the Senate unless committee guidelines state otherwise.
  • Committee chairs may be chosen by the Provost and approved by the Senate unless guidelines state otherwise.
  • All committee meetings are scheduled by the chair.
  • Committee minutes are to be distributed to the Faculty Clerk, the Provost, and committee members, with minutes also posted electronically so that they are available to all members of the faculty.
  • Committee recommendations and action items may be forwarded to the consideration of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, the Undergraduate or Graduate Policies and Procedures Committees, or directly to the Faculty Senate, with committee chairs consulting with the Provost and the Senate Clerk to determine which place such business should go.
  • Committee agendas may come from the Provost, Academic Deans, committee members or individual faculty members.
  • Committees should be composed of at least five faculty members unless committee guidelines state otherwise.

Academic Appeals Board

The Academic Appeals Board meets when there is a grade appeal escalated from a Dean's decision on a grade appeal. This board is responsible for grade appeals for both undergraduate and graduate courses. Appeals may come from students or faculty members.

Assessment Committee

The Assessment Committee designs and oversees the overall university assessment structure, evaluating data and department assessment plans, and recommending program-specific reviews.

Athletics Committee

The Athletics Committee acts in an advisory role, processing initiatives and changes.

Faculty Development Committee

The Faculty Development Committee awards financial support for faculty development grants, writing workshops, and faculty leaves; organizes and supports faculty research forums and faculty lectures; evaluates and selects undergraduate and graduate scholars of the year.

Institutional Review Board: Animal Care Committee

This committee evaluates and approves laboratory protocols involving the use of animals.

Institutional Review Board: Human Subjects Research Committee

This committee ensures that researchers follow accepted ethical standards when conducting human research.

International Program Committee

The International Program Committee distributes information, coordinates activities, provides direction to exchange programs, and formulates policy, including those associated with our sister school relationships. The Director of Study Abroad serves as chair.

Library Committee

This committee reviews the policies and procedures of the university libraries, serves as an advisory board to the Dean of the Libraries, promotes the use of the library and a program of library education for all students and faculty, and reviews concerns regarding the library, the archives and the campus museum.

Richter Committee

This committee sets the criteria for the Richter Scholar Program grants, solicits student research proposals, screens the proposals, and selects the recipients. In addition, the committee (particularly the committee chair) promotes the program, monitors compliance with the terms of the grants, and accounts for Richter funds.

Scholarship Committee

The Scholarship Committee works with the Student Financial Services Office to establish financial aid policy as it affects the academic program of the university, serves as the liaison between the Student Financial Services Office and the academic departments in the awarding of scholarships for students in specific fields of study, acts as an advisory body regarding academic issues, and communicates to the faculty regarding the financial aid program of the university.

Spiritual Life Advisory Committee

This committee listens to the students, faculty, administrators, and staff in an attempt to discern the spiritual health of the community, prays for the spiritual well-being of the community, suggests idea or activities that enhance spiritual well-being, and addresses potential issues with the appropriate organizations/committees/resource person or group. Reports to the VP for Student Life.

Teacher Education Committee

The Teacher Education Committee processes applicants for admission to the undergraduate teacher education program.

Teaching and Learning Committee

The Committee on Teaching and Learning provides feedback on faculty development initiatives and offerings, networks with faculty in their disciplines to discern helpful faculty development opportunities, and crafts faculty development goals and initiatives for the future.

The William Penn Honors Program Committee

The William Penn Honors Program Committee oversees activities, addresses curricular improvements, formulates policies, helps recruit students, and conducts an annual evaluation of the program. The Director of the Honors Program serves as chair.

 

Elected Faculty Committees

Faculty Council

This body consists of the biennially elected faculty representative and six additional faculty members elected to three-year terms. The chair is selected by the council membership at the first meeting of the year.

Two representatives are elected annually as well as replacements for the remainder of the terms for any council members who have resigned. The Senate oversees the election. Election is by majority vote of those voting. The Senate should determine before each election whether or how the number of candidates will be reduced for subsequent ballots should no one receive a majority of the votes. The election may be conducted electronically or in a business meeting of the full faculty. 

Representatives serve on the committee from each of the following Colleges: Education, Business, the College of Christian Studies, Liberal Arts and Honors, Seminary, Behavioral and Health Sciences, Engineering, and Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. Personnel Committee members are ineligible to serve. If a college does not have an eligible faculty member, or if no one from that college is willing to serve, the position on the committee will be elected from an at-large list of faculty willing to serve. This at-large position will also serve for three years.

The council has no legislative capacity, but serves the following advisory functions:

  • The council is available at any time during the year to consider the concerns of either faculty members or administrators. It is intended to act as a preventive mechanism and to moderate controversial action on the part of faculty members or administrators. It may help to identify issues that could be referred to the university dispute resolution process.
  • The council may represent and advocate faculty needs in such matters as salary, promotion, tenure, academic scholarships, and program budgets.
  • The faculty representative consults with the council in planning the regular faculty sharing sessions held for worship and/or discussion.

Faculty Personnel Committee

This committee consists of seven tenured faculty members, each serving a term of three years. At least two positions are elected each year. A third-year member is chosen by the committee to serve as chair. There will be a representative on the committee from each of the following colleges: Education, Business, Seminary and Christian Studies, Behavioral and Health Sciences, Engineering, and Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. There will also be a representative from the Faculty of Color. Members are nominated and elected by the full faculty, except for the Faculty of Color representative, who is nominated by the Faculty of Color. Faculty Council members are ineligible to serve. If a college does not have an eligible faculty member, or if no one from that college is willing to serve, the position on the committee will be elected from an at-large list of faculty willing to serve. This at-large position will also serve for three years. If there is no Faculty member of Color willing to serve, this position will remain vacant.

This committee is responsible for serving closely with the Office of Academic Affairs to oversee a tenure process that is fair and orderly, and functions in the best interests of both the faculty and the institution; reviewing tenure documentation materials; determining if faculty members undergoing sixth-year reviews meet the criteria for tenure in teaching, scholarship, and service; notifying reviewees and the Office of Academic Affairs of its recommendation whether the candidate should or should not continue to pursue tenure; working with the Office of Academic Affairs to establish and approve third-year and other peer review committees (except sixth-year review committees); and reviewing copies of all peer reviews and updates of Faculty Growth Plans as a result of peer reviews. The chair is selected by the membership.

 

Admission and Academic Standing Committees

Undergraduate Academic Standing Committee

This committee is responsible for reviewing student appeals of academic suspension, advising students on academic probation and suspension concerning their academic performance, and advising the Registrar regarding the academic status of students who do not meet grade point average (GPA) requirements. A representative of the Academic Affairs Office is included in the membership.

Graduate Academic Standing Committee

This committee is responsible for reviewing graduate student appeals of academic standing. Appeals are limited to questions concerning proper use of the process for determining academic standing.

Student Appeals Board

This committee meets only when there is a grade appeal escalated from a Dean's decision on a grade appeal.

Admissions Committees

A variety of programs have admissions committees that serve as an advisory body to the Vice President for Enrollment and Marketing, helping that person to understand more specifically who can be served at George Fox University. The committees help establish procedures, monitor recruitment methods, and make decisions regarding provisionally admitted students. Committees exist for:

  • Undergraduate Admission MAT Admission
  • Master of Education Admission Doctor of Education Admission
  • Administrative Licensure/Educational Leadership Admission
  • Seminary Master’s Degree Programs/Certificates Admission
  • Doctor of Ministry (DMIN) Admission
  • MA in Clinical Mental Health Counseling & Marriage, Couple, and Family Counseling Admission
  • Master of Arts in School Counseling Admission
  • Adult Degree Program (ADP) Admission
  • Master of Business Administration (MBA) Admission
  • Doctor of Business Administration (DBA) Admission
  • Doctor of Psychology (PSYD) Admission
  • Doctor of Physical Therapy Admission
  • Master of Social Work (MSW) Admission

 

Approval Process for Academic Programs and Policies

Guiding Principles

Working effectively in academic governance requires careful and regular attention to these issues:

  • The university’s mission
  • The financial results of proposals
  • The impact on student learning and spiritual growth
  • Communication with the other “stakeholders” in the governance process
  • Strategic goals of the university

 

Faculty members individually and corporately have major responsibilities in developing and processing program and policy proposals. Colleges, academic departments and schools, committees, and councils

process ideas that arise from any source. The faculty senate or the faculty as a corporate body then discusses and acts on the programs and proposals referred to it.

Among the stated duties of the President is to “secure the endorsement of the Board of Trustees for changes in policy adopted by the faculty, and to delegate to appropriate officers the implementation of such policies.” This partnership of the administrators and the faculty in processing proposed changes in programs and policies requires careful consultation throughout the process.

Among the responsibilities of the Board of Trustees, as stated in Article II of the George Fox University bylaws, is to “establish and review the educational programs of the university and establish the academic standards to be observed by the university.” The Board Chair consults with the President to determine proposals that warrant discussion by the Academic Affairs Committee of the Board and the full Board.

 

The Flow of Academic Decision Making

The charts below show the flow of discussion and approval for academic proposals. Note that the process for consideration of undergraduate and graduate proposals is different. At the graduate level, the College acts in place of academic committees, and the Academic Leadership Team acts in place of the various graduate faculties in Stages Two and Three, except for major proposals when the Graduate Senate or Faculty Senate can choose to review the proposal.

 

Undergraduate Governance Process

flow chart

Graduate and Adult Degree Program Governance Process

flow chart

 

Stage One: Development and Refinement of Ideas

Ideas may originate from an individual or group connected to the faculty – faculty members, departments and colleges, administrators, committees. Refining and improving the ideas may take place formally or informally but in every case there should be consultation with the appropriate College dean, particularly if there is any financial requirement for implementation. Because major initiatives may require the approval of The Executive Leadership Team or even the Board, the Provost seeks a “green light” from the Executive Leadership Team before new proposals move to Stage Two.

Stage Two: Preliminary or Final Discussion and Action

Academic program and policy proposals are generally discussed, reviewed, and approved at the school or college level for graduate proposals, or the appropriate faculty review committee for undergraduate proposals (Undergraduate Curriculum Committee, Undergraduate Policies and Procedures, General Education Committee, Undergraduate Finance Committee). These undergraduate committees may request the presenter to provide additional information or to make changes in the proposals that are submitted. Generally, undergraduate changes in the catalog require faculty approval, and all college decisions regarding graduate program changes are reviewed and approved by the Academic Leadership Team.

Stage Three: Faculty Discussion and Approval

When the Faculty Clerk, Graduate Clerk, or Undergraduate Clerk determine that proposals have been processed appropriately at the first two stages, they place them on the agenda for discussion and action at an Undergraduate Faculty Senate Meeting, the Graduate Faculty Senate Meeting, or the Full Senate Meeting. 

The Faculty Senate may approve a program in two ways:

  • Approval in Concept/Preliminary Approval – The purpose of the approval-in-concept judgment is to promote early review of proposals and early feedback by the wider faculty, so that subunits may be directed and encouraged in their labors. Such early review keeps faculty as a whole informed as to what is going on and helps subunits expend their efforts wisely. Approval in concept indicates that the relevant subunit is encouraged to continue developing a proposal, with due attention to concerns expressed in the Faculty Senate Meeting, with the presumption (but not assurance) that a suitably revised and completed proposal will probably be endorsed by the faculty senate at a later.

Proposals approved in concept must still be given final approval at a Faculty Senate Meeting.

  • Approval/Final Approval – Approval is typically the final Faculty Senate Meeting action with respect to a new proposal, even when a proposal may require some modification before implementation. Approval indicates that the faculty now trust the plan and the planners enough that further details can be worked out at the level of department and Dean or relevant council. Even before implementation, an approved proposal has the status of an existing program and is subject to the same processes of a proposal presented for final approval need not have been previously approved in concept.

Stage Four: Executive Leadership Team Discussion and Approval

The Provost consults with the President to determine if proposals from the faculty require the Executive Leadership Team approval. Issues of financial impact and relevance to the university’s mission will be considered in this determination. Relatively minor academic actions may be presented to Executive Leadership Team members for information.

Stage Five: Board Discussion and Approval

After the Executive Leadership Team discussion and approval, the President determines if academic programs and policies approved by the Executive Leadership Team should be presented to the Board’s Academic Affairs Committee and the full Board. As noted above, the Board has the responsibility to act on proposals with major consequences for the university’s mission and financial strength.