Biology (BIOL) Courses

BIOL 100 Foundations of Biology
3 hours. A course to fulfill the general education requirement. Deals with the organization of living things, anatomy and physiology of cells and organisms, reproduction and heredity, and the role of energy in the ecosystem. Bioethical considerations are discussed. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.

BIOL 211 General Biology I
4 hours. An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.

BIOL 212 General Biology II
4 hours. An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisite: BIOL 211 General Biology I.

BIOL 220 Fundamentals of Cellular and Organismal Biology
4 hours. This course is a supplementary course to BIOL 221, 222 that provides necessary foundational training in cellular biology, genetics, plant/animal diversity and ecology needed for certain upper-division biology courses.

BIOL 221 Human Anatomy & Physiology I
4 hours. This covers structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course meets general education requirements and is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.

BIOL 222 Human Anatomy & Physiology II
4 hours. This covers structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary and digestive systems. The course meets general education requirements and is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I or permission from instructor.

BIOL 275 Field Experience
1-6 hours may be earned. This course includes internships and practica required for professional programs. The experience must have an on-site supervisor and/or a departmental instructor overseeing, designing and evaluating the content of the course.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and chairperson of the department.

BIOL 285 Selected Topics
1-4 hours. Offered when special needs arise or when sufficient enrollment permits, this course includes content-specific interests of faculty or visiting professors, or special training required by graduate or professional schools.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II and instructor's permission.

BIOL 300 Evolution
2 hours. A study of mechanisms involved in natural selection and assumptions required. Topics include history of the theory, geochronology, molecular biology, developmental biology, paleontology, comparative physiology, biochemistry and biogeography. The interface of evolution and Christianity are examined. Two lectures per week.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.

BIOL 310 Developmental Biology
4 hours. Theories and study of differentiation as they apply to growth and development of animals, with some emphasis on the mechanism involved. Includes historical topics, fertilization, embryonic organization, cell induction, histogenesis, organogenesis, and developmental morphogenesis of echinoderms, frogs, chicks and pigs. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.

BIOL 322 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
4 hours. The comparative study of the structure and functional morphology of organisms in the phylum Chordata. Laboratory will emphasize dissection of representative vertebrate animals. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.

BIOL 333 Advanced Physiology
4 hours. This is an investigation of physiological principles in animals. A majors-level course is intended to meet the physiology requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. Investigation of physiological principles in humans/mammals, with emphasis on mechanisms of integration and homeostasis at cellular, organ and system levels. Topics include muscular, neural, vascular, excretory and endocrine interactions. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.

BIOL 335 Neuroscience
4 hours. An introductory course that provides a basic understanding in the multidisciplinary field of neuroscience. Major topics covered in this course include neural signaling, neurophysiology, sensation and sensory processing, physical and functional neuroanatomy, movement and its central control, nervous system organization, brain development, complex brain functions and diseases of the nervous system. The course will examine different model organisms that have advanced the field of neuroscience. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.

BIOL 340 Plant Physiology
4 hours. A study of plant function from the molecular to the organismic level. Photosynthesis, respiration, water relations, growth and development, mineral nutrition, and practical applications will be covered. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.

BIOL 350 Genetics
4 hours. A general genetics course covering Mendelian genetics, population genetics, and an introduction to molecular biology. This course fulfills the requirement for biology majors, and is appropriate for those with an interest in current topics in genetics, including inheritable diseases, cloning and other recent scientific breakthroughs. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II.

BIOL 360 Ecology
4 hours. An analysis of population, community and ecosystem dynamics. Laboratory will emphasize field measurements, computer modeling and behavior. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week, and one required field trip to the Malheur Field Station. Additional course fee required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.

BIOL 367 Essentials of Microbiology
4 hours. A course in the structure, metabolism, classification and health aspects of microorganisms. Special emphasis will be given to human-microbe interactions and clinical aspects of infection. Methods of microbiological investigation are emphasized and include current techniques and experiences within the field of microbiology. Course designed for students not majoring in biology. Additional course fee required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I; BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II; CHEM 151 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I; and CHEM 152 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II; or permission of the instructor.

BIOL 370 Microbiology
4 hours. A course for biology majors in the structure, metabolism, classification and health aspects of microorganisms. Special emphasis will be given to microbial diversity, the molecular physiology and genetics of prokaryotes, and the human immune response to infection. Methods of microbiological investigation are emphasized and include current techniques and experiences within the field of microbiology. Additional course fee required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or instructor's permission.

BIOL 380 Ornithology
4 hours. A study of avian biology including phylogeny, evolution, anatomy, physiology, behavior and ecology. Laboratory will emphasize identification, bird banding and basic anatomy. Two lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week, and one required field trip to the Malheur Field Station. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.

BIOL 390 Systematic Botany
4 hours. Collection, identification, classification and morphology of vascular plants, with emphasis on the angiosperms. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week, and a required field trip. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.

BIOL 399 Cross-Cultural Study
3 hours. This course offers in-depth discipline-specific cross-cultural study designed to enhance the intercultural emphasis of various academic majors. The course includes class meetings followed by travel to various locations throughout the world. Students will use core disciplinary knowledge to serve, learn and interact with other cultures. (Offered in May Term. Students must meet eligibility requirements.) Additional course fee is required.

BIOL 410 Molecular Biology
4 hours. An introduction to the modern field of molecular biology. We will examine the structure, organization and transfer of genetic information at the molecular level and its requirement for life processes. Viral, prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems will be examined. Major themes include transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional events (RNA processing), and regulation of translation. The laboratory is designed to include current techniques and experiences within the field of molecular biology. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 350 Genetics and CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry I.

BIOL 420 Cell Biology
4 hours. This course includes the study of cell physiology, energetics, neurobiology, muscle biology and cell signaling. Other topics that will be discussed are cancer and immunology at the cellular level. Laboratory will focus on current cell culturing and analysis techniques. Three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II, and CHEM 331 Organic Chemistry I.
Recommended: CHEM 341 Biochemistry I.

BIOL 450 Advanced Human Anatomy
4 hours. A majors-level course intended to meet the anatomy requirement of graduate/professional programs in health-care fields. A course presenting a systemic approach to the study of the human body. Lecture presentations begin with an introduction of anatomical terminology, tissue classification, and developmental origins to systems. Body structure will be studied by organ systems and will involve some histology. Laboratory work will follow a regional gross anatomy of the human body through cadaver dissection, human skeletal collections and preserved specimens. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II, or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II, or instructor's permission.
Recommended: BIOL 333 Advanced Physiology.

BIOL 460 Invertebrate Zoology
4 hours. Comparative phylogeny, morphology, ecology and life histories of several invertebrate groups and protozoa are covered. Includes three lectures and one three-hour laboratory per week. Some weekend field trips required. Additional course fee is required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II.

BIOL 465 Biological Research
1-4 hours. Specific instructional programs, laboratory or field research, or independent study as planned under an advisor. A total of not more than 4 hours may be applied toward the major.
Prerequisites: upper-division biology majors and by permission.

BIOL 475 Field Experience
1-6 hours may be earned. Includes internships and practica required for professional programs. The experience must have an on-site supervisor and/or a departmental instructor overseeing, designing, and evaluating the content of the course.
Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and chairperson of the department.

BIOL 485 Selected Topics
1-4 hours. Offered when special needs arise or when sufficient enrollment permits. Course content includes specific interests of faculty or visiting professors, or special training required by graduate or professional schools. Additional course fee required.
Prerequisites: BIOL 211 General Biology I and BIOL 212 General Biology II or BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I and BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II and instructor's permission.

BIOL 490 Biological Exploration
2 hours. Discussion- and experience-based course covering scientific analysis, communication and research.
Prerequisite: biology majors with junior status or by permission.

BIOL 496 Senior Thesis
1 hour. An independent study course for completion of a senior thesis. Required for all thesis-track majors in their senior year.

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