History (HIST) Courses

HIST 110 Western Civilization to 1648
3 hours. Course is a survey of Western civilization from the ancient world through the Reformation and religious wars, including attention to the origins and development of religious, political and economic life and ideas.

HIST 120 Western Civilization from 1648
3 hours. Course is a survey of European civilization from early modern Europe to the present day. Special attention is given to the political, economic and religious developments that continue to influence European society and its role in world events.

HIST 151 United States to 1865
3 hours. The first half of a two-semester survey of American history, this course surveys historical development from human origins in North America through the founding of the United States to the end of the Civil War.

HIST 152 United States from 1865
3 hours. The second half of a two-semester survey of American history, this course surveys historical development in the United States beginning with Reconstruction of the nation during and after the Civil War and continuing through contemporary times.

HIST 250 Latin America
3 hours. This is a study of Latin American countries from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the conditions that have led to the crises of recent years.

HIST 275 Field Experience
2-10 hours. Supervised experiences in museums, historical societies and government agencies.
Prerequisites: upper-division history majors, and by permission.

HIST 280 Introduction to Political Philosophy
3 hours. Course is a study of great political thinkers and issues from Socrates to the present. Students are encouraged to understand and evaluate these thinkers in their historical contexts, and to consider them as philosophers whose insights are relevant for contemporary debates. (Identical to PHIL 280 and PSCI 280.)

HIST 285 Selected Topics
3 hours. Occasional special courses scheduled to fit the interests of students and faculty and the needs of a shifting society. A course in presidential elections is offered in presidential-election years (2012, 2016).

HIST 290 Introduction to Historical Studies
3 hours. Course serves as an introduction to the basic skills, methods and resources of historical scholarship; the types of historical literature and scholarship; Christian foundations for historical interpretation; historical schools of interpretation; and the uses of historical scholarship.

HIST 300 American Political Theory
3 hours. Course is a survey of the major developments in U.S. political theory from the Puritans to the present. The relationship between Christianity and American political theory is given special attention. (Identical to PHIL 300 and PSCI 300.)

HIST 330 The American West
3 hours. Class examines the relationship of the American West to the rest of the nation through its exploration, settlement and development. Special attention is given to the Pacific Northwest and to the Native American experience.

HIST 331 England to 1688
3 hours. Course covers the growth of the English nation from Roman times to the Glorious Revolution, with special attention given to constitutional and religious development.

HIST 332 England from 1688
3 hours. Class covers England in the modern age, emphasizing the response of its institutions to its rapidly changing role in the European and world communities.

HIST 340 History of the Middle East
3 hours. Course explores the political, economic, social and religious developments in the Middle East from the ancient to the modern era, with emphasis on the latter period.

HIST 343 History of Southern Africa
3 hours. Course is a study of the history of southern Africa from about 1500 to the present, with particular attention to the native groups of the region, Dutch colonization and British imperialism, and relations between diverse ethnic groups in the last two centuries.

HIST 360 Modern Russia
3 hours. Course is a study of 20th- and 21st-century Russia and other former Soviet republics, with emphasis on their current significance in the world and the factors in their history that brought the Revolution of 1917 and the collapse of the Soviet Union.

HIST 363 War and Conscience in the United States
3 hours. Course is an exploration of American thought on the subject of war, both today and in past crises such as the American Revolution, Civil War, wars with the American Indians, the world wars, Vietnam War, and the Gulf War; a study of the official position major church bodies have taken in regard to war; and the experiences of individuals who refused to fight. (Identical to PSCI 363.)

HIST 370 Modern China and Japan
3 hours. Class covers political and cultural developments of China and Japan.

HIST 380 The African-American Experience in the United States
3 hours. Class is a study of Africans in an America dominated by those of European descent.

HIST 390 Peace Research
1-3 hours. Course involves directed research on peace subjects, both current and historical. Students will normally write a major research paper. (Identical to PSCI 390.)

HIST 399 Cross-Cultural Study
3 hours. This course offers in-depth discipline-specific cross-cultural study designed to enhance the intercultural emphasis of various academic majors. The course includes class meetings followed by travel to various locations throughout the world. Students will use core disciplinary knowledge to serve, learn and interact with other cultures. (Offered in May Term. Students must meet eligibility requirements.) Additional course fee is required.

HIST 401 Christianity in History I
3 hours. The development of Christianity from its appearance within the Greco-Roman world through the medieval period, and its influence as a base for culture in the West, is studied. (Identical to RELI 401.)

HIST 402 Christianity in History II
3 hours. Christianity's development is covered, from the dawn of the Protestant Reformation through its global spread during the modern era, observing its historical context and relationship to the surrounding cultures. (Identical to RELI 402.)

HIST 410 Classical Greece and Rome
3 hours. Course is a survey of classical Greece and Rome from 1600 B.C. through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the West in the fifth century A.D. Political, economic and social developments are stressed, including the rise of Christianity and the early church.

HIST 419 Medieval Europe
3 hours. Course is a survey of medieval Europe from the collapse of the Roman Empire in 500 to the rise of Modern Europe in 1500. Special attention is given to the important political, economic and religious developments of this period.

HIST 421 Europe from the Age of Enlightenment to 1890
3 hours. European political, economic, cultural and intellectual developments from the late 17th century through 1890 are studied.

HIST 422 Europe 1890-Present
3 hours. Course covers Europe in the 20th and 21st centuries, with emphasis on the upheavals of the two world wars and the status of the European states today.

HIST 450 The United States and Persian Gulf Conflicts
3 hours. Class examines the American role in the two wars with Iraq, their antecedents and results. Attention is also given to the contemporary issue of terrorism and its relation to these wars.

HIST 456 Classics of American History
3 hours. This course is a seminar that allows students to study some of the great works of American history. In addition to mastering the historical knowledge the books provide, students will develop an advanced understanding of both the social and political climate within which the books were written, and the histiographical traditions that informed the interpretations.

HIST 457 The Colonial Experience, 1607-1763
3 hours. This course studies Colonial life in the British colonies of North America from the founding of Jamestown to the end of the French and Indian War. Emphasis is placed on religious conflict and development, the growing sense of a unique American identity, and the importance of community as opposed to the distant British government in the lives of everyday citizens.

HIST 458 The Making of the American Republic, 1754-1825
3 hours. This class studies the world of the founders. Emphasis is placed on the ideological, social and political milieu that gave birth to the American Revolution and Constitution. The course also considers the radical changes in American society the revolution set in motion.

HIST 459 The Era of the Civil War, 1825-1898
3 hours. Course examines the causes of the Civil War. In addition, slavery, Christianity, the westward movement, the struggle for power in Congress, Abraham Lincoln, the rise of Northern industrialism, and Southern society are all studied in their own right and in relation to the conflict some historians call "the crossroads of our being."

HIST 468 America in the Time of the Two World Wars, 1898-1945
3 hours. Considers how economic growth and then depression challenged the American government and people to redefine the American Dream and to discover new avenues for achieving it. At the same time, Europe confronted America with two world wars, which also changed the nature of American society and the role of the United States in the world.

HIST 469 Recent America, 1945-Present
3 hours. Class studies America as the leader of the Western world during the Cold War and how that role impacted the social, economic, intellectual and political currents in American life. This course also examines the rise of interest groups, the increased political prominence of ethnic and women's groups, and the impact of these groups on American culture.

HIST 470 Renaissance and Reformation
3 hours. Course covers the political, social and religious life of Europe from the beginning of the Renaissance to the Peace of Westphalia, with emphasis on the various reform movements and their impact on the modern world.

HIST 475 Field Experience
2-10 hours. Supervised experiences in museums, historical societies and government agencies.
Prerequisites: upper-division history majors, and by permission.

HIST 485 Selected Topics
3 hours. Occasional special courses are scheduled to fit the interests of students and faculty and the needs of a shifting society. A course in presidential elections is offered in presidential-election years (2016, 2020).

HIST 490 History Seminar
3 hours. The course examines the methods professional historians use in writing history and the main currents in American historiography through the reading of America's most influential historians. Working closely with the instructor, students are required to write a research paper based on primary sources. The paper will be permanently retained by the history faculty.
Prerequisite: HIST 290 Introduction to Historical Studies.

HIST 495 Special Study
1-3 hours. Independent study of subjects outside regular offerings. Guiding bibliographies are provided, and regular reading reports and conferences are scheduled.
Prerequisites: upper-division history majors, and by permission.

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