Student Life Handbook



Welcome

Back to top

Welcome Letter - VP for Student Life

"To the Christian . . . the development of an inquiring mind becomes an expression of faith and hope and love addressed to God."

- Arthur F. Holmes

It is certainly my pleasure to welcome you to a year of personal growth on the campus of George Fox University! We are thrilled that you have joined this living and learning community and look forward to engaging in the challenges and opportunities of the coming year with you. It is our deepest hope and commitment that you will find George Fox to be a caring and supportive Christ-centered home where you are stretched intellectually, socially, and spiritually.

During your time at GFU, you will undoubtedly grow in every area of your life. Certainly, your mind will be challenged and equipped as you interact with professors and peers in class, engage in significant conversations in the residence halls, and write thoughtful research papers. In addition, as a community that believes Christ brings coherence to one's academic pursuits as well as to all of life, we hope that you will make the most of every opportunity to grow spiritually.

Our desire is that you will live life to the fullest as you surrender to God's will each day and experience His grace, power, and provision. You will also have many opportunities to put your faith and learning into practice. Clearly, we live in a world that desperately needs well-prepared persons of deep character and conviction who will love and serve other people. This is a part of God's calling on your life as a GFU student (and, one day, as a graduate) . . . to love and serve others in tangible ways.

George Fox University seeks to cultivate a community that glorifies God, respects and celebrates diversity in its many forms, and encourages your academic success and personal growth. We welcome your unique strengths, talents, reflections, ideas, and experiences and anticipate a great year together as God shapes our lives and our community.

If I can be of any assistance to you, please don't hesitate to stop by my office on the third floor of the Stevens Center, call me at 503-554-2312, or email me at blau@georgefox.edu. The Office of Student Life is here to serve you and our sincere desire is that you will experience God's grace and power in the coming year!

Wishing you God's richest blessings,

Brad A. Lau

Vice President for Student Life

Communication with Students

Back to top

Use of The Undergraduate Student Handbook

The Undergraduate Student Handbook is provided to articulate the lifestyle standards, community policies, and other aspects of being a member of the George Fox community. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the information in this handbook, in no sense is it to be considered a binding contract, and it may be changed at any time by action of appropriate bodies within the university.

Communications Statement

The university strives to communicate effectively through a variety of media. Students are expected to frequently check their campus mailboxes, their personal George Fox email, and The Daily Bruin. These contain important information and deadlines for students. As a student it is your responsibility to regularly access and follow through with pertinent information in these different forms of communication.

Our goal is to help you have an amazing experience at Fox and we want you to have the important information that will assist you in your journey.

Lifestyle Standards and Values

The university seeks to admit students who will best succeed and benefit from a distinctly Christ-centered education and environment. Members of the George Fox community demonstrate Christ-centered values and are committed to the integration of faith and learning. Chapel attendance and Bible/religion courses are required of all students.

Affirming the following honor statement is a condition of admission. Since signing it is a promise made to the university to maintain this standard for as long as a student is enrolled, it should be agreed to only by applicants who wholeheartedly support the lifestyle described therein.

In accordance with Christ-centered convictions honoring the body as the temple of the Holy Spirit, the George Fox University community expects its students to follow a lifestyle that excludes gambling, the use or possession of non-medicinal drugs, alcohol, tobacco, obscene or pornographic articles or literature, and forbids immoral sexual behavior.

When you signed your admission application you agreed to abide by our lifestyle agreement. The full lifestyle statement can be viewed on our website.

Undergraduate Student Handbook Policy Updates

The Undergraduate Student Handbook is updated annually. The list below includes all polices that have been changed or added to in some way for the 2014-15 academic year. Unless otherwise noted, changes were made throughout the sections. The handbook has also undergone a complete reorganization and redesign that we hope will make information more accessible to students. Below are the new or updated policies:

  • Table of Contents
  • Support for Students
  • Appeals Process
  • Retaliation
  • Bystander Intervention & Conditional Immunity
  • Sexual Misconduct, Sexual Assault and Dating/Domestic Violence
  • Title IX Compliance & Coordinators
  • Campus Awareness & Education
  • Title IX & Campus SaVE Act Training for Students & Employees
  • Campus Climate Surveys
  • Domestic Violence
  • Dating Violence
  • Stalking
  • Alcohol, Drugs & Tobacco
  • Bullying
  • Cyberbullying
  • Hazing
  • Pornography
  • Sexuality & Relationships
  • Visitation

Student Life Facebook Page

You can also connect with Student Life on their Facebook page. Look for Student Life at George Fox University.

Key Aspects of Community

Back to top

Community Membership: A Process of Discovery

During the college years, you will discover a broader range of people and ideas than you have ever encountered before. University life is an exciting world on its own, but its small in comparison to the world of possibilities that await you after graduation.

At George Fox University, we believe education is more than learning theories, reading books, and writing essays and papers. We believe education is a variety of knowledge, ideas, experiences, and people that prepare you to step out with confidence as you realize your full potential. We encourage you to take risks this year in learning about yourself and others as members of this Christ-centered community of learning.

At George Fox, we will help you answer these critical questions:

  • Who do I want to be when I graduate?
  • What values do I want others to see in me?
  • What is God calling me to do?

The George Fox experience will help you become a person of commitment, character, and wisdom who can answer these questions with confidence.

A person of commitment is someone committed to love - love for God, love for others, and love for yourself. Mark 12:30-31 says, "Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. Love your neighbor as yourself (NIV).'

A person of character is someone who maintains his or her standard and commitments in both public and private spheres.

A person of wisdom is someone who has more than knowledge. A person of wisdom is a man or woman who knows how to pursue knowledge and how to use it to benefit others. When you pursue knowledge with humility and generosity, you will become wise - and help others around you do the same.

As you grow in commitment, character, and wisdom, you will also grow in confidence - in yourself and in the Lord. As Philippians 1:6 says, "For I am confident of this very thing, that He who began a good work in you will perfect it until the day of Christ Jesus.” (NASB)

In all aspects of your student experience you will discover that George Fox University faculty, staff, and administrators are pursuing commitment, character, and wisdom right beside you. Not only will you build a foundation in your area of interest, you will also be challenged to be humble in spirit as you prepare to serve others with what you have learned within and outside of the classroom.

We hope you will consider this student handbook as a resource - a place to turn for information, counsel, and insight. Its content represents a guide to the essence of the university, our people, and mission.

The Foundational Beliefs of Our Community

It’s important for students to understand the core beliefs of George Fox University:

The mission, vision, and values describe the foundation of our community.

Our statement of faith defines what we believe as a Christ-centered university.

Defining Community

As a student at George Fox University, you are a member of a community. One of the primary functions of this comprehensive online student handbook is to help define what being a community means at this university. Each member of our community plays a role in creating an atmosphere where others can learn, mature, and prepare to meet the challenges that lie beyond the college years. The expectations of our community reflect our commitment to our Christian philosophy of education.

Relationships

Living in daily fellowship with members of our Christ-centered community is a privilege and an expression of God's grace. In recognition of this privilege, we place great value on the quality of relationships in our community, and we acknowledge we are interdependent on and accountable to one another.

The greatest expression for our relationships is love: the responsibility to love God with all our hearts, souls, minds, and strength, and to love our neighbors as ourselves. This means that unselfish love should be the motive for our decisions, actions, and relationships. While there are many ways to express this type of love, we expect students to focus on the following:

Building Up One Another

Each member of the community should strive to maintain relationships that support, encourage, and assist one another.

Bearing One Another's Burdens

We encourage our community to walk alongside those who are experiencing grief, discouragement, illness, tragedy, or other personal trials. We can do this by offering comfort, encouragement, consolation, and intercession.

Speaking the Truth in Love

We can strengthen our community and ourselves by being honest and loving in all our dealings with one another. Problems in relationships and behavior can be resolved constructively by confronting one another in an appropriate spirit. If we act for the benefit of others and do so in a loving manner, such confrontation can help us all mature and grow to be more like our Lord.

Reconciliation and Restoration

For our community to be healthy, we must work to heal broken relationships. When relationships have been damaged, regardless of the reason, we are encouraged to reach out to one another and forgive in order to restore those relationships and to make restitution. Our commitment to celebrate diversity and educate people regarding cultural differences is another important reason to reconcile relationships that need repaired.

Practicing these and other expressions of love in our relationships requires continued effort and sensitivity to others. While strong, healthy relationships take work, they reward us by enriching our lives, honoring God, and helping us meet our personal goals and those of our university community.

The book of Colossians provides an excellent summary of the goals of our community:

"Therefore, as God's chosen people, holy and dearly loved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, gentleness and patience. Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievances you may have against one another. Forgive as the Lord forgave you. And over all these virtues, put on love, which binds them all together in perfect unity. Let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, since as members of one body, you were called to peace. And be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly as you teach and admonish one another . . . And whatever you do, whether in word or deed, do it all in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God . . ."(Colossians 3:12-17 NIV)

Guiding Principles and Lifestyle Standards

Back to top

Lordship of Jesus Christ

We believe the Scriptures establish the basic principles that should guide the development of Christian character and govern all Christian behavior. These include the lordship of Jesus Christ over all life and thought. This involves wholehearted obedience to the word of God as taught in the Old and New Testaments and exemplified in the life of Jesus Christ; the careful stewardship of mind, time, abilities, funds, and opportunities for intellectual, spiritual, and interpersonal growth; and the care of our bodies as temples of the Holy Spirit.

Biblical Expectations

As members of this community, we must remember that our behavior reflects not only on ourselves, but on other members of our community and on our Lord Jesus. Whether we step out into the world around us or interact in our own smaller realm, the things we say and do are a testimony to who we are and whom we serve.

Scripture teaches us that we can exhibit certain attributes by allowing the Holy Spirit to guide our behavior. These attributes include love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. This fruits of the Spirit (see Galatians 5:22-26) are to be sought, encouraged, and demonstrated in our relationships.

Conversely, Scripture condemns attributes such as greed, jealousy, pride, lust, and hatred. Although these characteristics are sometimes difficult to discern - especially in ourselves - they can hinder relationships with God and with others and lead to destructive or unacceptable behavior. Members of our community are expected to reject these attitudes so that each one of us can grow in grace and righteousness.

Certain behaviors condemned by biblical teaching are not acceptable for members of the George Fox University community. They include theft, lying, all forms of dishonesty, gossip, slander, backbiting, profanity, vulgarity (including crude language), sexual immorality, drunkenness, immodesty of dress, and occult practices.

In keeping with scriptural teaching about the authority of government, members of the George Fox community are expected to uphold the laws of the local community, the state of Oregon, and the nation. The only exception would be the rare occasions in which obedience to civil authorities would require behavior that conflicts with the clear teaching of Scripture, in which case each individual would submit voluntarily to the civil penalty for disobeying the law. In every other case, behavior resulting in civil arrest on or off campus is subject to review and accountability.

The University also recognizes that while the Scriptures do not provide specific teaching regarding all social practices, they do advocate self-restraint in things that are harmful or offensive to others. In light of this, there are numerous responsibilities set forth for members of our community.

Honesty and Integrity

All community members are expected to be people of character who are honest and live a life of integrity.

Honesty is defined as telling the truth, being truthful in our actions and our words, and admitting when we have made a mistake.

Integrity means doing what you say you will do, making sure your actions match your words, and abiding by what’s expected of you, even when no one is watching. Honesty and integrity are honored and valued in all aspects of the George Fox community.

University Expectations

The University has created certain guidelines and expectations we believe contribute to our sense of Christian community and to its aims and goals. These high standards are not set forth as absolutes or an index of Christian spirituality, but rather as expectations for those who choose to be a part of our community.

We recognize that not all students are committed followers of Jesus, have the same standards for living ascribed to by the university, or necessarily agree with some facets of the university's lifestyle expectations. However, in the admissions process you signed the application agreeing to respect and abide by the lifestyle standards and community expectations (to be followed by all students of George Fox University) for as long as you are enrolled as a student. Since we are to trust and be responsible to each other, violating these standards is regarded as a breach of integrity.

Establishing community and lifestyle expectations is one way a community helps its members develop as individuals. While each person is an individual, individuals must share responsibility for the community. We believe that by describing the expectations that come along with being a member of the university community, students should be able to take a more active role in helping George Fox University function as a Christian community and in achieving our goals as an institution of higher learning.

Lifestyle Standards and Values

As a community we encourage and teach our members to follow Jesus Christ and be collaborators in God's work in the world. We urge each member to become the kind of person and live the kind of life that Jesus taught and modeled. We believe such a life is described by the 'fruit of the spirit' as listed in Galatians 5:22-23. These fruits include love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, gentleness, goodness, faithfulness, and self-control.

We believe the Bible teaches that all persons are created in God's image and that God actively seeks renewed relationships with every individual. We are bound therefore to regard each person with love and respect. (Romans 12:9-21, 1 Corinthians 13, Ephesians 4:32). So we avoid discrimination, abusive or manipulative actions, and gossip or mean-spirited behaviors. We seek actively to honor each person, loving and serving one another as Jesus taught us.

Our lifestyle excludes immoral practices and calls us to transformed living as we 'offer [our] bodies as living sacrifices' to God (Romans 12:1-2). In regard to sexual morality, we believe that only marriage between a man and a woman is God's intention for the joyful fulfillment of sexual intimacy. This should always be in the context of mutual compassion, love and fidelity. Sexual behaviors outside of this context are inconsistent with God's teaching.

We recognize these principles may conflict with the practice and opinion of some within the larger culture. We are convinced that this is God's design for providing the most loving guidance and practice for individuals and our community.

For a community to be its members must live with integrity. This includes honest academic work, telling each other the truth, keeping our promises and living so our actions match our words. (James 1:22-25)

The university is eager for each member of the community to grow spiritually (Hebrews 10:24-25).

We encourage involvement in activities designed to nurture spiritual growth. This includes Bible study, small prayer groups, service opportunities, and chapel attendance. The university encourages all members of the community to maintain personal practices of discipleship and to participate in a local church.

Our goal is to help each community member to think the same way as Christ thought (Philippians 2:5). This includes disciplining our minds to think about what is true, honorable, just, pure, pleasing, commendable, excellent and worthy of praise as commended to us in Philippians 4:8. We avoid gambling, not only to practice good stewardship of our resources, but also to prevent welcoming greed inwardly and joining in the social inequities on which gambling thrives.

While we recognize that committed Christians differ in how they view the consumption of alcoholic beverages, it is clear that the improper use of alcohol by students, faculty or staff could bring much harm to the communities of George Fox University. This is especially true of the traditional undergraduate community which consists largely of students who are under the legal drinking age. Nationally, it is well documented that underage and binge drinking as well as driving with significant blood alcohol levels are major problems on college campuses.

In addition, there is growing evidence that some individuals are predisposed to alcoholism. For these reasons, the use of alcohol by traditional undergraduate students is not allowed at any time they are enrolled at the university.

The use of alcohol at university-sponsored events or activities is not allowed. Further, the presence or use of illegal drugs or alcoholic beverages is not tolerated on any George Fox University campus, nor is the illegitimate use of prescription drugs. The university prohibits smoking and all forms of tobacco use everywhere on-campus; as well as off-campus by employees and traditional undergraduate students.

The goal of the George Fox University lifestyle standard is to create a community in which individuals are encouraged to be transformed into the image of Christ. In addition, we desire that our common life would reflect the teachings and Spirit of Christ in all that we do and say. In this ongoing process of transformation, all members of the George Fox community are encouraged to consider the following questions as a means of self-examination, in the tradition of the historic Friends (Quakers).

As individuals or groups within this community reflect on these questions we encourage them to respond in obedience to God's leading and to seek encouragement, support and accountability from other members of the community.

  • Am I actively pursuing the highest call of God on my life even if that means giving up a personal 'freedom' for the sake of others within the community?
  • As a member of the George Fox community, do I recognize my duty and responsibility to others within our Christ-centered community?
  • Am I a faithful steward of the resources which God has entrusted to me?
  • Do I discipline my mind and body to serve as instruments of God?

These lifestyle standards reflect the university's mission, faith commitments, values, and our rich heritage. They are intended to facilitate our life together at George Fox University. A more detailed description of specific aspects of these standards can be found under the Community Policies section of the student handbook. If you have any questions regarding the lifestyle expectations, please contact the dean of community life or associate dean of students in the student life office.

Application of Lifestyle Standards

As part of the George Fox University community, students are to abide by the lifestyle standards and community expectations while they are:

  • Enrolled in classes for the Fall Semester (including Thanksgiving), Spring Semester (including Spring Break), May Term, and Summer Term.
  • Representing the George Fox University community in any programs on or off campus, whether they are enrolled or not, or are employed by the institution.
  • Living in university housing

Over Christmas break and the summer, students should keep in mind they are representing the George Fox University community. The University expects students to use discernment and wisdom in their behavior and decision-making during these periods.

Since most students are also members of smaller communities - their families - we want to make it clear that the policies of the university are not intended to infringe upon the family. Therefore, residential students who are home for vacation or the weekend are assumed to be a part of the family unit and under the direction of their parents. Commuting students are expected to abide by these policies except when university regulations conflict with the authority of the family. However, situations where students are at their parent’s home and violate GFU policies without a parent being present may incur appropriate interventions from student life personnel.

Support for Students

Back to top

Student Support Network

The SSN is a program designed to identify and support students who are struggling academically, socially, or personally. The SSN consists of a small team of faculty, staff, and administrators representing a variety of departments who are invested in the academic and personal success of George Fox University undergraduate students. This group meets regularly during the academic year to confidentially discuss appropriate and timely interventions for students in need of assistance or support.

In providing this support, struggling students will be encouraged to develop both their independence and their interdependence within the context of the campus community. The goal of the SSN is to encourage students' persistence to graduation and their active pursuit of God's call on their lives. To accomplish this important objective, the SSN assigns an appropriate person to follow up with the student and point him or her to the many resources that are available. Our hope is that some of the identified resources will help the student in resolving specific issues or concerns.

For further information about the SSN, please visit ssn.georgefox.edu. If you know a student who may be experiencing some difficulties or struggles and needs help please fill out the intervention alert form and the SSN will follow up appropriately.

Responsibility for Self-Care Policy

The University believes it is important to foster an environment that encourages students to maintain a standard of responsibility for self-care (i.e., the ability to respond adequately to one's emotional, physical, and educational needs). Some students who are distressed engage in behaviors that impact their self-welfare or the welfare of the university community. These behaviors may require further assessment or support services by appropriate professionals to ensure the safety of the student and GFU community members.

Various resources on campus are available to assist students to return to adaptive levels of functioning. However, some students may be compromised in their ability to ensure their own self-care (i.e., to appropriately access these resources) due to the presence of suicidal ideation, eating disorders, thought disorders (i.e., psychosis), or other harmful behavior or actions. Given that these students might not seek services voluntarily, or at the suggestion of staff, faculty, or administrators; they may need to be mandated to do so administratively. As such, students who exhibit an inability to maintain the standard of responsibility for self-care may be required to participate in a mandatory safety assessment process. The purpose of the mandatory assessment is to assure the student is connected with the appropriate services to afford the student the opportunity to improve her or his welfare, as well as to uphold the welfare of the community.

The responsibility for self-care is essential for students to continue in their enrollment at George Fox University. The expectation is for willing students to take advantage of supportive resources so they will be able to either stay in school or return to school, including situations that required hospitalization. This assumption is only challenged by the student's actual behavior after being engaged by the University’s administrative representative - such as multiple suicide attempts, broken safety contracts, and a general unwillingness to assume responsibility for the student’s self-welfare. The University is committed to assisting students within this process so they will be successful in their journey.

Missing Student Notification

Because the safety and well being of students is paramount, necessary steps will be taken when a student is believed to be missing. A student may be considered missing if he/she is:

  • Unreachable in person, by telephone (talking or text messaging), email, or other forms of electronic communication for 24 hours or more
  • Overdue in reaching a specified destination more than 24 hours past their expected arrival
  • If additional factors lead University staff to believe he or she is missing.

In these circumstances, an immediate investigation will be conducted and an intentional effort will be made to locate the student in question.

If you believe a student is missing, please contact the Student Life Office or Security Services immediately. If the student lives on-campus, an Area Coordinator or the Associate Dean of Students/Director of Residence Life may also be contacted. The Dean of Community Life or Director of Security Services may also be contacted if the missing student is a commuter.

If it is determined that the student is missing, University officials will immediately notify the following:

  • The designated emergency contact in MyGFU or, for students living on-campus, the emergency contact information collected by his/her RA may also be used (if available).
  • The student's parent or legal guardian if that individual is not the designated emergency contact, and the student is under 18 years of age and not an emancipated individual.
  • The Newberg Police Department. They will be given appropriate information gathered by University officials, even if the student has not registered an emergency contact person.

Only authorized campus officials and law enforcement officers may have access to this information in a missing person investigation. When a missing student is located, student life personnel may determine the student’s state of health and intention of returning to campus. When appropriate, a referral may be made to the University Health & Counseling Center.

Students are strongly encouraged to periodically review and update their emergency contact information in MyGFU.

General Student Complaint Procedures

Informal Complaint Procedures

It is the wish of the University to provide an education and services of high quality to its students and to provide equity and harmony in the application of policies and procedures. When a student has a complaint, the University would encourage resolution be sought through informal communication with the appropriate instructor, college dean, staff member, or administrative officer who may be able to help rectify or clarify the situation before a written complaint is initiated.

Formal Complaint Procedures

This Complaint Policy does not supersede specific policies involving special cases such as grade appeals, sexual harassment, appeal and due process, etc. that are further defined in the Student Handbook, Catalog, Graduate/DPS Policies or elsewhere.

Lodging a Formal Student Complaint: A student who wishes to lodge a formal complaint with the University must complete and submit the formal complaint form to the appropriate Director, Dean, Vice President, or Provost. A form is available in the Office of Student Life and Office of Academic Affairs, as well as online.

Administrative Complaint Acknowledgment: Formal student complaints will be forwarded to the administrator most immediately responsible for the area to which the complaint pertains. The administrator will send a written acknowledgment to the student within five working days of receiving the complaint indicating that: (1) the formal complaint form has been received, (2) the nature of the complaint, and (3) that the student will receive a written response after deliberation within fifteen working days. Copies of the written student complaint and the acknowledgement letter will be sent to the Director, Dean, Vice President, or Provost over that area.

Administrative Deliberation and Response: If the administrator to whom the complaint is forwarded determines that the nature of the complaint is beyond his/her area of supervision or expertise, the next level administrator in the area should be consulted and may be requested to respond to the student. Administrative disposition of the complaint will generally consist of investigation into the source of the complaint, previous efforts to resolve the issue, and any contingencies that will aid in the deliberation and disposition of the problem. The responding administrator will send to the student a written statement of attempted resolution to the problem. A copy of the deliberation response will be sent to the appropriate Director, Dean, Vice President, or Provost. All formal student complaints will be forwarded upon resolution to the Vice President for Student Life’s office where a log will be kept.

Student Appeal Process: Upon receiving a deliberation response to the written complaint, the student has the right of appeal to successive levels of administrators within the area. This appeal must be made in writing within five working days of receiving the Administrative response. In each case, the student will receive an acknowledgement of the appeal within five working days upon receipt of the complaint and a deliberation response within fifteen working days from the date of the acknowledgment letter.

Administrative Levels for Student Complaints: The appropriate office for student complaints will be as follows:

  • Provost and Academic Deans (academic, accreditation, institutional research, library, academic departments and programs, International recruitment and student services)
  • Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (administrative services, bookstore, facilities, plant services, finance, human resources, financial aid, athletics, student accounts, information technology)
  • Vice President of Advancement (alumni, parent relations, fundraising, event services)
  • Executive Vice President of Enrollment and Marketing (admissions, registrar, marketing and communications, publications)
  • Vice President for Student Life and Student Life Deans (residence life, housing, spiritual life, intercultural life, student activities, student organizations, student services, food services)

The only appeal beyond the offices listed above is to the President of the University. The appeal timeline stated above applies. The decision of the President will be final.

Community Accountability Process

Back to top

The Purpose

Members of our community are responsible for their own behavior, as well as holding each other accountable. As a university committed to the integration of faith and learning, we believe in the model of accountability as outlined in Matthew 18:15-17: "If your brother sins against you, go and show him his fault, just between the two of you. If he listens to you, you have won your brother over. But if he will not listen, take one or two others along, so that every matter may be established by the testimony of two or three witnesses. If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church; and if he refuses to listen even to the church, treat him as you would a pagan or tax collector" (NIV). Within our Christ-centered community, a brother or sister is to be restored through confrontation and reproof that are part of a loving relationship.

Community accountability provides a venue for students to experience responsibility, growth in self-discipline, and assistance in their journey.  The desired outcome is helping students learn and grow, as well as encouraging them through an intentional process designed to help them make better decisions.  At the core, it is intended to be redemptive and restorative with the care and development of each person in mind.

Student Life personnel including resident assistants, area coordinators, assistant area coordinators, the associate dean of students, and the dean of community life, desire to journey with students by providing accountability while extending grace, care, love and forgiveness.

Being Truthful

Honesty and integrity are vital aspects of the community accountability process. When a student tells the truth it is honorable and highly valued, even if it means being honest about making a mistake. It is a community expectation that students are honest when asked questions about a situation where potential lifestyle or policy violations occurred. If a student lies to university personnel the severity of the circumstances may be escalated. Lying increases the seriousness of the situation and the degree of consequences that may be incurred by the student. Being truthful is imperative and expected.

Information about academic honesty

Help to Change and Grow

We trust that each member of the George Fox community is fully aware of his or her own behavior and the positive and negative effects that behavior can have upon the rest of the community. If you know your behavior is outside the limits established by the university and want assistance to change, you are encouraged to take the initiative and discuss your concern with a student life staff member without the threat of disciplinary action. In the case of such personal concerns, student life staff will help you toward growth and assistance to live within the community guidelines. Exceptions to this approach may be when behavior is repetitive, self-destructive, hazardous to others, or involves a significant legal issue in which the university is obligated to uphold the law.

Conversely, if you know a student who is violating the community expectations, you are encouraged to go directly to that person and express your concern about the behavior and about the consequences it might have on the community and the individual. Ask the student if he or she is willing to change the offending behavior and live within the community expectations. If there is a positive response and the behavior changes, the problem may be resolved. If your confrontation does not solve the problem, the problem is serious (e.g., discrimination or harassment), or there is a continuing pattern of adverse behavior, encourage the student to seek assistance from a student life staff member or tell them you will go with them to get help.

If a student life staff member receives information about an incident or situation it can no longer be defined only as a personal problem. It may be considered a community issue and dealt with through the community accountability process. Ignoring problem behaviors give tacit and unspoken approval to the behaviors in question and do nothing to restore the individual's relationship with the community.

If a student is passively in the presence of other students who are violating the lifestyle standards they may be considered as an active participant in the situation. As stated previously, failure to address a violation provides unspoken approval of the behavior. Generally, all students involved in a situation such as this are held accountable. For example, if a student is with other community members that are drinking alcohol, the student may be held accountable for being present with the group even if he or she did not consume alcohol. In such a case, the university believes the student should have withdrawn from the group.

Procedures

Any student who violates the lifestyle statement or community policies is held accountable for his/her actions through the community accountability process as outlined below:

  1. Student Life personnel conduct an investigation and meets with the student(s) to discuss the incident report and collect further facts regarding the incident.
  2. The student may select one of two courses of action:
  • The student(s) may admit the alleged violation and request the student life representative take whatever action seems appropriate. In an investigation involving sex discrimination, sexual harassment or sexual assault, any Complainant under Title IX is informed of and may appeal the outcome. In cases of harassment, discrimination, bias-related incidents or hate crimes, any Complainant is also informed of and may appeal the outcome as per University policy for these types of incidents.
  • The student(s) may deny the alleged violation, in which case a hearing is held before the Associate Dean of Students or Dean of Community Life (depending the nature of the violation), or his/her designee.

The Hearing Process

When the course of action is a hearing, the following outlines the various aspects of this process. Complainants are encouraged to participate in the hearing. Any Complainant under Title IX, as well as other applicable University policies listed above, is informed of and may appeal the outcome of the hearing.

  1. The student(s) involved are entitled to an expeditious hearing of the incident.
  2. The hearing is informal in nature and does not adhere to formal rules or procedures, or rules followed by courts of law.
  3. The student(s) are entitled to the following in regard to the hearing:
    • Written notification of the time and place of the hearing.
    • Information regarding the procedures as outlined here.
    • A written or electronic statement that outlines the violations.
  4. The student(s) may appear at the hearing to present his/her involvement in the incident. If a student chooses not to appear at the hearing, she/he must inform the student life administrator who is hearing the case. In these instances the hearing may be conducted based on the written evidence.
  5. If a lawyer is consulted, such a person may give any advice she/he believes pertinent, but he/she may not enter into the community accountability procedures or attend the hearing.

Hearing Findings and Outcomes

After hearing a case, the Associate Dean of Students or Dean of Community Life (depending on the nature of the violation), or his/her designee, may decide as follows:

  1. Not responsible for a violation: No violation of the lifestyle statement or community policies has been proved.
  2. Responsible for a violation: A violation of policy or the lifestyle statement has been proved. In this case, the Associate Dean of Students or Dean of Community Life (depending the nature of the violation), or his/her designee, may impose appropriate sanctions.

Written notification of the outcome is communicated to the student(s) involved (including any Complainant as required by Title IX, or other applicable University policies listed above) at an appointed time with the student life administrator who conducted the hearing. If a student does not appear at the selected time, notification is made through email and/or campus mail.

Determining Responsibility in Specific Incidents

In sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, harassment, discrimination, bias-related incidents or hate crimes cases the following additional aspects also apply within the community accountability process. As in other situations, for these incidents the standard used to determine responsibility is the preponderance of the evidence; whether it is more likely than not that the alleged perpetrator has violated community policies or lifestyle expectations. The University reserves the right to impose differing sanctions depending on the severity of the offense, up to and including termination for an employee, and dismissal for a student. Although it is separate from the community accountability process, perpetrators may also face criminal charges.

The Title IX Coordinator/Vice President for Student Life designates the investigating officer and hearing officer. Typically, the Associate Dean of Students serves as the investigating officer and the Dean of Community Life serves as the hearing officer in sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, harassment, discrimination, bias-related incidents or hate crimes involving undergraduate students. The Complainant/alleged survivor and the alleged perpetrator may appear separately at the hearing. Both receive information about the outcome of the hearing and have the opportunity to appeal the decision of the hearing officer. Appeals are made to the Student Board of Appeals, as designated by the Title IX Coordinator/Vice President for Student Life.

University Personnel Responsibilities

  • Ensuring that the Complainant/alleged survivor and the alleged perpetrator are aware of the seriousness of the complaint
  • Explaining the University’s sex discrimination, sexual harassment and sexual assault policy and investigation procedures
  • Making referrals to the Health and Counseling Center for counseling and referral services, if appropriate
  • Discussing with the Complainant/alleged survivor the option of notifying the police if criminal activities are alleged
  • Conducting or arranging for an investigation of the alleged prohibited conduct
  • Preparing or overseeing any reports, recommendations, or remedial action(s) that are needed or warranted to resolve any prohibited conduct
  • Assuring that each complaint is assessed and resolved individually

General Rights of Complainants/Alleged Survivors and Alleged Perpetrators 

Complainant/Alleged Survivor’s Rights:

  • An explanation of available options for redress
  • Freedom from harassment or retaliation by the alleged perpetrator (or supporters)
  • An explanation of the community accountability process
  • Notification of no contact with alleged perpetrator
  • Use of any available internal and external support services
  • Ability to speak on their own behalf during the investigation, including making a “survivor impact” statement
  • The presence of an advisor from the University community and/or a support person during the hearing
  • The opportunity to present witnesses who can speak about the charges (character witnesses excluded)
  • Freedom from having irrelevant sexual history discussed during the hearing
  • Information about the outcome of the hearing
  • Opportunity to appeal the outcome of the hearing

Alleged Perpetrator’s Rights:

  • An explanation of the charge(s)
  • Freedom from harassment or retaliation by the Complainant/alleged survivor (or supporters)
  • An explanation of the community accountability process
  • Notification of no contact with the Complainant/alleged survivor
  • Use of any available internal and external support services
  • The presence of an advisor from the University community and/or a support person during the hearing
  • The opportunity to present witnesses who can speak about the charges (character witnesses excluded)
  • Freedom from having irrelevant sexual history discussed during the hearing
  • Information about the outcome of the hearing
  • Opportunity to appeal the outcome of the hearing

False Reporting

Any student found to be falsely reporting and/or falsely accusing an individual of sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, harassment, discrimination, bias-related incidents, or hate crimes may face appropriate aspects of community accountability, up to and including suspension or dismissal from the University.

Appeals Process

Any student may appeal the outcome, the process and any action taken by student life personnel. In cases involving sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault, harassment, discrimination, bias-related incidents, or hate crimes the Complainant/alleged survivor has the opportunity to appeal the decision outcome.  Appeals must be made within three academic days of notification of the original decision. The appeal should be sent to the specific administrator or board outlined in the student’s letter. For incidents resulting in suspension or dismissal, appeals are made to the Student Board of Appeals. This policy can be found by clicking here.

Responding to Situations

It is difficult to codify how all incidents may be handled because each situation brings with it a unique set of circumstances. The response from student life personnel is designed to provide accountability and appropriate consequences for each student involved in a situation. The nature of the infraction, the severity of a violation, as well as the frequency of similar offenses, is considered in the community accountability process. The majority of situations result in specific consequences designed to help the student learn and grow in the following areas: character development, decision-making, understanding the importance of integrity, affirming their commitment to the community, being held responsible for their actions, receiving love and forgiveness, being honest and sincere, speaking the truth in love, and being fully restored to the community.

In serious circumstances students may receive a suspension warning and other appropriate consequences, accountability and support. A suspension warning serves as a formal notice that a long-term suspension (either immediate or deferred termination of student status for one or more semesters) or dismissal (permanent termination of student status) may result if there are further violations of the lifestyle standards or community policies.

As the passage in Matthew suggests, there are times when an individual may need to leave the community for personal restoration and reconciliation. This is not done punitively, but in love and respect for the student involved and for the good of the community at large. In egregious violations, consequences may include a long-term suspension or dismissal.   Suspensions and dismissals are rare occurrences made with careful deliberation.

Students serving a long-term suspension or who have been dismissed are not permitted to be on campus property, attend class, live in campus housing, participate in university-sponsored co-curricular activities, attend university-sponsored events, or represent the university in any official capacity for the duration of the suspension. The student’s academic advisor and instructors are informed of the suspension, but usually not of the circumstances leading to it.

In the case of a suspension or dismissal, the student’s financial aid would be revoked.  Even if the student successfully appeals their suspension or dismissal, or is readmitted, they still need to appeal their revoked financial aid status with Student Financial Services.

If a student chooses to withdraw before fulfilling the required community accountability sanctions, including suspension, these stipulations may need to be fulfilled before she/he is allowed to re-enroll. Graduating students who do not complete assigned consequences may have their diploma and/or transcript withheld until the sanctions are complete.

Safety of the Community

The University reserves the right to immediately respond with whatever measures it deems necessary in order to protect the personal safety of student’s, employee’s or other people. This may include situations in which the University or its representatives believe that because of a student’s behavior, there exists a threat of imminent danger to the student or others; significant disruption of the work, academic, or student life environment; or significant damage to University property. Such measures include, but are not limited to: temporary removal of the student from his/her living situation on campus or from the campus as a whole, modification of living arrangements, and/or interim suspension from campus pending a hearing.

Retaliation

Retaliation is prohibited by federal law and institutional policy. It is defined as any adverse or negative action against a person participating in any reporting, investigation or proceeding that is perceived as: intimidating, threatening, coercing, hostile, harassing, retribution, or violence that occurred in connection to the making and follow-up of the report. This also includes actions against an individual who has: (1) complained about alleged discrimination, harassment or retaliation, (2) participated as a party or witness in an investigation relating to such allegations, or (3) participated as a party or witness in a court proceeding or administrative investigation relating to such allegations.

Federal civil rights laws, including Title IX, make it unlawful to retaliate against an individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by these laws. Intimidation means to make fearful or to put into fear. Generally, proof of actual fear is not required in order to establish intimidation. It may be inferred from conduct, words, or circumstances reasonably calculated to produce fear. Any person violating this policy may be subject to appropriate community accountability, up to and including termination if they are an employee, and suspension or dismissal if they are an undergraduate or graduate/DPS student.

Bystander Intervention & Conditional Immunity

George Fox is deeply committed to the health, safety, and well-being of its students. Bystander intervention by students can be a critical aspect of enhancing the welfare of his/her peers. Students are strongly encouraged to contact University personnel, call 911 or seek other professional or medical attention when the health or safety of themselves or others is threatened or appears to be at risk.

The University wants to eliminate barriers for students who may be hesitant to seek medical or emergency help or report the incident to university officials because they fear being held accountable for policy violations (e.g., drinking alcoholic beverages). To encourage reporting, George Fox pursues a policy of offering students who are accessing help for themselves or others, conditional immunity from being charged with policy violations related to the particular incident. While there may be no community accountability sanctions for these individuals, the University may provide elements of help, support, and education.

Good Standing Policy

It is a privilege for students to participate in curricular and co-curricular programs at George Fox University. The university expects these students to be leaders and role models in our community who will live with integrity. It is essential that students embrace the challenge to live as people of character and be held to a high standard of accountability. There are a myriad of departments and programs that require participating students to be in good standing with the University. These departments or programs include, but are not limited to: 

  • Athletics
  • Student Athletic Trainers
  • Theme Living Communities
  • Theatre Department & Players
  • Music Department
  • Forensics
  • Psychology Department
  • Social Work/Sociology Department
  • Semesters Off-Campus Program
  • Juniors Abroad
  • Off-campus housing
  • Admissions Bed & Breakfast Club
  • Admissions Ambassadors
  • Admissions Student Employees
  • Admissions Interns
  • Teacher Education
  • Spiritual Life
  • May Serve
  • Serve Trips
  • Residence Life
  • ASC
  • Act 6 Leadership and Scholarship Program
  • Orientation & Peer Advisors
  • ARC Consultants
  • Nursing Majors
  • International Students
  • Tuition Remission
  • Tuition Exchange

Students may lose good standing if they have violated:

  • The University’s lifestyle standards.
  • Community policies as outlined in the Student Handbook including, but not limited to, severe or repetitive community violations.
  • Federal, state, or local laws that resulted in a conversation with University personnel.

Students may regain good standing when they have fulfilled:

  • Requirements and methods of accountability required or enforced by Student Life personnel.
  • Stipulations and timeframes as outlined by each department or program they are involved in.

The consequences and means of accountability issued by each department or program are determined by the supervising university employee. This process is separate from any sanctioning and accountability that happens in the community accountability process by student life.

In addition to the good standing policy, each department or program may have additional expectations for participation. Please check with the supervising university employee for these additional requirements.

Sexual Misconduct, Sexual Assault and Dating/Domestic Violence

Back to top

Title IX

Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal law that prohibits sex discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs and activities, including but not limited to athletic programs that receive federal funding.

Title IX States: 

"No person in the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or activity receiving Federal financial assistance." (20 U.S.C. Sec. 1681).

Under Title IX, discrimination on the basis of sex can include sexual harassment, sexual assault and sexual violence.

Institutional Compliance with Title IX 

It is the policy of George Fox University to provide an educational environment free of all forms of sex discrimination, including but not limited to unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct or communications constituting sexual harassment, as defined in this policy and as otherwise prohibited by state and federal statutes. Sexual harassment, including acts of sexual assault and sexual violence, is a form of sex discrimination and is prohibited at George Fox University. This prohibition against discrimination on the basis of sex applies to all students, faculty and staff, to other members of the George Fox community, and to contractors, consultants and vendors doing business or providing services to the school.

In accordance with Title IX, the president of George Fox University has designated the following Title IX Coordinator(s) as the primary contacts responsible for coordinating compliance with Title IX.

Title IX Coordinators

Coordinator Title Name/Position Office Location Phone/Email
Lead Coordinator

Brad Lau
Vice President for Student Life

Student Life Office, Stevens Center, 3rd floor

503-554-2312
blau@georgefox.edu

Deputy Coordinator

Laura Hartley
Dean, College of Arts & Sciences

Lemmons 9A

503-554-2143
lhartley@georgefox.edu

Deputy Coordinator

Mark Pothoff
Dean of Community Life

Student Life Office, Stevens Center, 3rd floor

503-554-2313
mpothoff@georgefox.edu

Deputy Coordinator

Lisa Burton
Assoc. Dir. of Human Resources

Human Resources Office

503-554-2183
lburton@georgefox.edu

Deputy

Elise Trask

Wheeler Sports 

503-554-2934

Coordinator Assoc. Dir. of Athletics Center etrask@georgefox.edu
Deputy Coordinator

Carol Brazo
Assoc. Prof. of Education

Portland Center 503-554-6115
cbrazo@georgefox.edu

Title IX Coordinator Roles and Responsibilities

The Lead Title IX Coordinator is responsible for implementing and monitoring Title IX compliance on behalf of George Fox University. This includes coordination of training, education, communications and administration of the complaint and grievance procedures for the handling of suspected or alleged violations of Title IX.

The Deputy Title IX Coordinators are also responsible for implementing and monitoring Title IX compliance at George Fox University and for notifying the Lead Title IX Coordinator of any alleged or suspected violations of Title IX and the resolution of such alleged or suspected violations, regardless of whether a grievance is submitted.

When Should I Contact a Title IX Coordinator? 

Any student, faculty or staff member, or applicant for admission who has concerns about sex discrimination, including but not limited to acts of sexual harassment, sexual assault or sexual violence, is encouraged to seek the assistance of one of the Title IX Coordinators identified above.

Contact a Title IX Coordinator if you:

  • Wish to understand your options if you think that you may have encountered sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual assault or sexual violence;
  • Learn of a situation that you feel may warrant an Institutional investigation;
  • Need help on how to handle a situation in which you are indirectly affected;
  • Want information about possible informal remedies or administrative measures to de-escalate or alleviate a difficult situation
  • Have questions about George Fox University’s policies and procedures.

Confidentiality

Conversations with Title IX Coordinators are kept as confidential as possible, but information about incidents of suspected violations of Title IX must be shared to the extent necessary to conduct an investigation and take any corrective action deemed appropriate by the University.

Purpose

George Fox University is committed to providing a Christ-centered community that fosters a safe living, learning, and work setting for students, employees, and visitors. A core value of this institution is to maintain a respectful environment for all individuals that is free of the following:

  • Sexual Harassment
  • Sexual Assault
  • Domestic Violence
  • Dating Violence
  • Stalking
  • Sexual Exploitation
  • Harassment & Discrimination
  • Bias-Related Incidents & Hate Crimes

These behaviors and actions are contrary to the mission, values and Lifestyle Standards of our community, and are violations of federal and/or state law. It is our firm belief that engaging in any aspect of this behavior is inappropriate for members of the George Fox community.

These policies are for undergraduate students in any program at George Fox University. Graduate/DPS students should see the Graduate/DPS Student Life Policies for comparable applicable policies. Additionally, while many aspects are pertinent for faculty, staff and administrators, employees should see appropriate sections in the employee handbook. 

The following addressing the aforementioned policies, reporting mechanisms, venues for help and support, complaint procedures, and other important aspects of prevention and response.

Campus Awareness and Education

Awareness and educational efforts are important aspects of preventing and responding to incidents that may arise. These include the following:

  • Orientation sessions for new undergraduate and transfer students, as well as graduate/DPS students, designed to educate students regarding the outlined behaviors, University policies and expectations, and essential reporting and resources.
  • Yearly educational efforts reminding for current students and employees regarding these policies and important information.
  • Residence Life offers self-defense workshops on an annual basis on the Newberg Campus in September and October.
  • Campus safety precautions are reviewed yearly and appropriate upgrades are implemented.
  • Assistant Area Coordinators (AACs) and Resident Assistants (RAs) are trained annually to respond and assist students in crisis situations and in protocols for emergency response.
  • Flyers, posters and other educational documents are posted yearly in prominent locations on campus.

Title IX & Campus SaVE Act Training for Students & Employees

Undergraduate students, Graduate/DPS students and Employees must participate in an online course designed to educate our community in the areas of Title IX & the Campus Sexual Violence Elimination Act (Campus SaVE Act).

The student course helps students to better understand and develop skills around bystander intervention, consent, healthy relationships, the effects of alcohol, social norms and reporting assaults.

The employee online course(s) trains faculty, staff and administrators on topics including:  understanding social norms, perpetrator behavior, victim blaming, cautions for risk-reduction, reporting offenses, investigative procedures, victim rights, and sexual harassment.

Campus Climate Surveys

Campus climate surveys are conducted annually in order to address and understand the following:

  • How sexual assault affects the health, mental health, and academic success of students.
  • The scope or nature of the problems of sexual assault on campus in order to increase knowledge to aid in campus response, intervention and prevention efforts.
  • Student’s knowledge about reporting policies and resources for victims, their attitudes about prevention, and their perceptions about how the University is addressing the issue of sexual violence.

Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment is unwanted sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, or other visual, verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

  • Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment or academic status
  • Submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual influences employment or academic status decisions affecting that individual
  • Such conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with an individual's work, academic performance, student life or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work, academic, or student life environment.

While sexual harassment encompasses a wide range of conduct that may be verbal, visual, or physical in nature, specifically prohibited conduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • Promising, directly or indirectly, a student, employee or other person a reward, if the student or employee complies with a sexually oriented request.
  • Threatening, directly or indirectly, retaliation against a student, an employee or another person, if the student, employee or another person refuses to comply with a sexually oriented request.
  • Denying, directly or indirectly, a student or employee an employment or education related opportunity, if the student or employee refuses to comply with a sexually oriented request.
  • Engaging in sexually suggestive conversation.
  • Displaying pornographic or sexually oriented materials.
  • Engaging in indecent exposure.
  • Making sexual or romantic advances toward a student, employee or another person and persisting despite the student’s, employee’s or other person’s rejection of the advances.
  • Physical conduct such as assault, touching, or blocking normal movement.
  • Retaliation for making reports of harassment or threatening to report harassment.

More subtle forms of inappropriate behavior such as offensive posters, cartoons, caricatures, comments, and jokes of a sexual nature are prohibited, as they may constitute sexual harassment when they contribute to a hostile or offensive work, academic, or student life environment.

Sexual harassment can involve males or females being harassed by members of either sex. Although sexual harassment sometimes involves a person in a greater position of authority as the harasser, individuals in positions of lesser or equal authority also can be found responsible for engaging in prohibited harassment.

Sexual harassment can be physical and/or psychological in nature. An aggregation of a series of incidents can constitute sexual harassment even if one of the incidents considered separately would not rise to the level of harassment.

Sexual Assault

Sexual assault is not tolerated in the George Fox community. These behaviors also violate local, state and federal law. Sexual assault can occur between any two people, regardless of age or gender. The University highly encourages survivors to take advantage of the provided internal and external resources for reporting, support and help.

Definitions

Sexual assault is defined as any nonconsensual sexual contact or intercourse, whether it is unforced or forced. This includes any contact with intimate body parts of an individual. It is also penetration, however slight, of any intimate body part with a body part or an object.

Consent is explicit, informed, voluntary and mutually understandable communication to willingly participate in specific sexual activity without pressure, threats, coercion, force or intimidation. Either person must also be able to withdraw consent and cease any sexual activity at any time. A current relationship, having previous sexual encounters, or silence from the individual may not be taken as an indication of consent. Similarly, a passive response or sexual advances that are not resisted physically or verbally do not constitute consent.

Someone who is not of legal age, has a mental disorder, or is physically or mentally incapacitated may not give consent. The use of alcohol or drugs may render an individual incapable of giving consent due to impaired judgment and the inability to make decisions or communicate intentions. Consent may not be given by someone who is unconscious or unaware, or for any reason is unable to communicate her/his intentions.

Domestic violence

Domestic Violence (as defined by the Violence Against Women Act) is the use of physical, sexual or emotional abuse or threats to control another person who is a current or former spouse or other intimate partner, such as a boyfriend or girlfriend. It includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.

Examples of domestic violence include but are not limited to:

  • Causing or attempting to cause physical or mental harm to a family or household member
  • Placing a family or household member in fear of physical or mental harm
  • Causing or attempting to cause a family or household member to engage in involuntary sexual activity by force, threat of force, or duress
  • Engaging in activity toward a family or household member that would cause a reasonable person to feel terrorized, frightened, intimidated, threatened, harassed, or molested

Dating violence

Dating Violence is violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of: (1) the length of the relationship, (2) the type of the relationship, and (3) the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

Dating violence is a pattern of assaultive and controlling behaviors that one person uses against another in order to gain or maintain power and control in the relationship. The abuser intentionally behaves in ways that cause fear, degradation and humiliation to control the other person. Forms of abuse can be physical, verbal, sexual, emotional and psychological.

Examples include, but are not limited to, trying to cut off the victim’s relationship with family and friends, humiliating the victim in front of friends, making the victim fearful by using threatening behavior, threatening to find someone else if the dating partner doesn’t comply with the abuser’s wishes or demands, using or threatening to use physically assaultive behaviors such as hitting, shoving, grabbing, slapping, beating, kicking, and touching or forcing the victim to engage in unwanted sexual activity.

Stalking

Stalking is engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to: (1) fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or (2) suffer substantial emotional distress.

Acts of stalking include but are not limited to: electronic or telephone harassment, being followed, receiving unwanted gifts, and other similar forms of intrusive behavior.

Course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which the stalker directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates to or about, a person, or interferes with a person’s property.

Substantial emotional distress means significant mental suffering or anguish that may, but does not necessarily, require medical or other professional treatment or counseling.

Reasonable person means a reasonable person under similar circumstances and with similar identities to the victim.

Sexual exploitation

Sexual Exploitation occurs when a student takes non-consensual or abusive sexual advantage of another for his/her own advantage or benefit, or to the benefit or advantage of anyone other than the one being exploited, and the behavior does not otherwise constitute one of the other sexual misconduct offenses.

Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to:

  • Invasion of sexual privacy
  • Prostituting another person
  • Non-consensual viewing, videoing, audio-taping or broadcasting sexual activity
  • Engaging in voyeurism, which is the sexual interest in or practice of spying on people engaged in intimate behaviors, such as undressing, sexual activity, or other actions usually considered to be of a private nature
  • Knowingly transmitting an STD or HIV to another person
  • Exposing one’s genitals in non-consensual circumstances; inducing another to expose their genitals
  • Sexually based stalking and/or bullying may also be forms of sexual exploitation.

Discrimination, Bias and Harassment

Back to top

Harassment and Discrimination

George Fox University students and employees work, live, and learn in an environment where the dignity of each individual is respected. Harassment or discrimination due to race, color, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, religion, creed, age, national origin, citizenship status, workers' compensation status, physical or mental disability, veteran status, or any other status protected under applicable local, state, or federal law; or any other distinguishing characteristic protected by applicable non-discrimination law, is prohibited.

Actions that constitute harassment or discrimination may be verbal or physical conduct that includes, but is not limited to the following: demeaning gestures, threats of violence, physical attacks, or any types of threatening or verbal remarks. These behaviors include hazing, other initiations, or any actions that may be hazardous, dehumanizing, harassing or humiliating to people within or outside the George Fox community. Prohibited actions also include vandalism, destruction of a person’s property, the misuse of telephones, voicemail messages, text messages, United States or campus mail, as well as e-mail, social media or other electronic communication for the purpose of issuing obscene, harassing, or threatening messages.

Such conduct has the purpose or effect of interfering with an individual's work, academic, or student life environment. Students and employees are expected to conduct themselves in a manner that shows respect to all and ensures no discrimination or harassment occurs.

Bias-Related Incidents and Hate Crimes

Bias-related incidents can be any physical, spoken, visual or written acts of abuse, harassment, intimidation, vulgarity, or remarks of a personally destructive nature toward another person because of actual or perceived defining characteristics. This can occur whether the act is intentional or unintentional, or is directed toward an individual or group regarding: race, color, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, religion, creed, age, national origin, citizenship status, workers' compensation status, physical or mental disability, veteran status, or any other status protected under applicable local, state, or federal law; or any other distinguishing characteristic protected by applicable non-discrimination law.

A hate crime occurs when a bias-related incident involves a criminal act being committed. These crimes may involve, but are not limited to: physical assault, damage to property, bullying, harassment, verbal abuse or insults, or offensive graffiti or letters. Some hate crimes may violate Oregon and/or federal law, and the conduct underlying them violates university policies.

Guidelines for Responding to Bias-Related Incidents and Hate Crimes

Responding to concerns and incidents may vary depending on the nature and severity of a specific situation. It can include instances of protected speech that may generate harm requiring intervention with only limited consequences. Bias-related incidents may need to be addressed because they harm individuals, undermine civility and understanding of our community, or impede the educational process. Public discussion and education can promote awareness of prejudice and examination of the values that underlie the George Fox community. Some incidents are dealt with through the process of community accountability with appropriate sanctions.

Supporting the Student and Community

The University believes it is important to respond to a bias-related incident or hate crime with concern for the student or other person who has been targeted and the community as a whole. University personnel can assist the student or other person in documenting the event and explaining the options for addressing what has occurred. If the incident is a crime, the individual can be assisted in contacting the police. If the incident involves the violation of a University policy, the procedures for investigation and resolution may be undertaken.

Appropriate assistance is available to students who are targeted. University officials strive to ensure that the affected student feels safe in her/his educational environment and may, if appropriate, adjust or change course schedules. The University official may also offer help documenting the event (i.e. taking photos of the offending material); help in talking with/filing a complaint with the police; assistance in arranging counseling or other forms of support; or help, as appropriate, in initiating mediation between the affected student or other person and the offender. If it is appropriate, the targeted individual may also elect to participate in a University sponsored discussion about the incident, if one is held.

When bias-related incidents or hate crimes or occur on campus, they can strain the fabric of the community. University officials may consider what sort of communication about the incident is appropriate, taking into account various factors such as personal safety and confidentiality.

In some cases, public discussion about the incident can serve to educate the community and promote awareness of prejudice. Programs that address bias-related incidents can change a hateful incident into an opportunity for increased understanding and personal growth. In some cases, University officials may collaborate with other offices on campus and with students decide to offer programs that include one or more of the following: discussions, open forums, panels, films, speakers, and other educational programming. Among other things, these events may serve to help the community understand and address what has occurred.

Incident Response Team (IRT)

In addition to the response outlined in the Reporting & Resources section, the Incident Response Team (IRT) addresses issues relating to bias-related incidents and hate crimes. The IRT aids in developing recommendations to help the Student Life Office determine if, when and how the community should be informed of a bias-related incident or hate crime that has occurred. They also discuss and implement appropriate educational and programming opportunities in response to an incident.

The IRT is composed of the University Pastor/Dean of Spiritual Life, Inclusion & Leadership. Director of Inclusion and Student Leadership Programs, a member of the residence life staff, an additional member of the student life staff, a member of the faculty, a member of the diversity committee, and/or a student representative appointed by ASC and Inclusion Programs. The IRT convenes when an incident occurs.

Campus Security may work with the IRT in order to improve communication about incidents and their implications for groups and individuals within our community. The Newberg-Dundee Police Department may also be invited for discussion of bias-related incidents or hate crimes and may meet with the IRT as appropriate.

Reporting and Resources for Harassment, Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Bias-Related Incidents, Hate Crimes, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking and Sexual Exploitation

Back to top

Harassment, discrimination, sexual harassment, bias-related incidents, hate crimes, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and sexual exploitation are not tolerated in the George Fox community. These actions may also violate local, state and federal law. All complaints or allegations of harassment are investigated promptly by designated University personnel. Appropriate, corrective action may be implemented based upon the findings of the investigation. Although demeaning, discriminating or harassing messages on such things as flyers, posters, emails, social media (e.g., Facebook), voicemails, and graffiti are often obnoxious or worse, it is helpful to preserve them as evidence, and not to disturb or remove anything that could help identify the source and/or targets or other affected persons.

If any student or employee believes he or she has witnessed, or has been subjected to, harassment, discrimination, sexual harassment, bias-related incidents, hate crimes, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking or sexual exploitation, the person is encouraged to immediately report the incident to University officials as indicated below. Any person violating these policies may be subject to appropriate community accountability, up to and including termination if they are an employee, and suspension or dismissal if they are an undergraduate or graduate/DPS student.

Reporting Harassment, Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, Bias-Related Incidents, Hate Crimes, Domestic Violence, Dating Violence, Stalking and Sexual Exploitation - Responsible Personnel

Alleged Perpetrator (down)   Alleged Survivor  (right)

Undergrad Student  Undergrad Student Worker  Graduate/DPS Student  Administrator/Staff  Faculty

Undergrad Student 

Title IX/DOCL/RL Title IX/DOCL/RL/ Supervisor/HR Title IX/Dept. Chair/Academic Dean Title IX/DOCL/RL/ HR/VP Title IX/ Academic Dean/Provost

Undergrad Student Worker 

Title IX/ DOCL/RL/HR Title IX/DOCL/RL/HR/ Supervisor Title IX/Dept. Chair/Academic Dean/HR Title IX/DOCL/RL/ HR/VP Title IX/ Academic Dean/Provost

Graduate/DPS Student 

Title IX/ DOCL/RL/Academic Dean Title IX/DOCL/RL/Academic Dean/HR/Supervisor Title IX/Dept. Chair/Academic Dean Title IX/ DOCL/RL/ Academic Dean/HR/VP Title IX/ Academic Dean/Provost

Administrator/Staff 

Title IX/ DOCL/RL/HR/VP Title IX/DOCL/RL/HR/ Supervisor/VP Title IX/Dept. Chair/Academic Dean/HR Title IX/HR/VP Title IX/HR/ VP/ Academic Dean/Provost
Faculty Title IX/ DOCL/RL/HR/VP/ Academic Dean/Provost Title IX/ DOCL/RL/HR/ VP/Academic Dean/Provost Title IX/Dept. Chair/HR/VP/Academic Dean/Provost Title IX/ HR/VP/Academic Dean/Provost Title IX/ HR/Academic Dean/Provost

Responsible Personnel Key for Table Above:

  • Title IX = Title IX Coordinator/Title IX Department Quardinators 
  • DOCL = Dean of Community Life
  • RL = Associate Dean of Students/Director of Residence Life
  • HR = Human Resources
  • Supervisor = Student Employment Supervisor
  • Dept. Chair = Department Chairs
  • Academic Dean = Academic Deans in Academic Affairs
  • VP = Vice President
  • Provost = Provost in Academic Affairs

If an individual’s circumstances does not fit into the grid above please contact the Director of Security Services or the Dean of Community Life.

Retaliation

Retaliation is prohibited by federal law and institutional policy. It is defined as any adverse or negative action against a person participating in any reporting, investigation or proceeding that is perceived as: intimidating, threatening, coercing, hostile, harassing, retribution, or violence that occurred in connection to the making and follow-up of the report. This also includes actions against an individual who has: (1) complained about alleged discrimination, harassment or retaliation, (2) participated as a party or witness in an investigation relating to such allegations, or (3) participated as a party or witness in a court proceeding or administrative investigation relating to such allegations.

Federal civil rights laws, including Title IX, make it unlawful to retaliate against an individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by these laws. Intimidation means to make fearful or to put into fear. Generally, proof of actual fear is not required in order to establish intimidation. It may be inferred from conduct, words, or circumstances reasonably calculated to produce fear. Any person violating this policy may be subject to appropriate community accountability, up to and including termination if they are an employee, and suspension or dismissal if they are an undergraduate or graduate/DPS student.

Confidential Support

Undergraduate students dealing with the effects of these situations may receive confidential on-campus support by contacting the following department and individuals:

  • Health & Counseling Center (Medical & counseling needs) – Woodward House, 503-554-2350 (8am – 5pm, M-F)
  • Spiritual Life – Sheridan St. House, 503-554-2320 (8am – 5pm, M-F); Jamie Noling-Auth, University Pastor and Dean of Spiritual Life, Inclusion, & Leadership, jnolingauth@georgefox.edu

Reporting and Resources for Sexual Assault

Back to top

To foster the safety and security of the entire community, George Fox University strongly encourages immediate reporting of all alleged instances of sexual assault. There are several reporting options described below.

Through investigating and resolving reports of sexual assault the University is committed to respecting the rights of all parties involved. To this end, the University is prepared to provide help, support, and assistance to the alleged survivor and the alleged perpetrator.

All complaints or allegations of sexual assault are investigated promptly by designated University personnel. Appropriate, corrective action may be implemented based upon the findings of the investigation. If any student or employee believes he or she has witnessed, or is a survivor of an alleged sexual assault, the person is encouraged to immediately report the incident to University officials as indicated below. Any person violating these policies may be subject to appropriate community accountability, up to and including termination if they are an employee, and suspension or dismissal if they are an undergraduate or graduate/DPS student.

Procedures for community accountability

Note: Until a determination of a violation has been reached, the word alleged is used to describe both the survivor(s) and the perpetrator(s)]. University personnel exercise sensitivity and discernment while striving to protect the privacy of the students involved.

Retaliation

Retaliation is prohibited by federal law and institutional policy. It is defined as any adverse or negative action against a person participating in any reporting, investigation or proceeding that is perceived as: intimidating, threatening, coercing, hostile, harassing, retribution, or violence that occurred in connection to the making and follow-up of the report. This also includes actions against an individual who has (1) complained about alleged discrimination, harassment or retaliation, (2) participated as a party or witness in an investigation relating to such allegations, or (3) participated as a party or witness in a court proceeding or administrative investigation relating to such allegations. Federal civil rights laws, including Title IX, make it unlawful to retaliate against an individual for the purpose of interfering with any right or privilege secured by these laws. Intimidation means to make fearful or to put into fear. Generally, proof of actual fear is not required in order to establish intimidation. It may be inferred from conduct, words, or circumstances reasonably calculated to produce fear. Any person violating this policy may be subject to appropriate community accountability, up to and including termination if they are an employee, and suspension or dismissal if they are an undergraduate or graduate/DPS student.

Bystander Intervention & Conditional Immunity

George Fox is deeply committed to the health, safety, and well-being of its students. Bystander intervention by students can be a critical aspect of enhancing the welfare of his/her peers. Students are strongly encouraged to contact University personnel, call 911 or seek other professional or medical attention when the health or safety of themselves or others is threatened or appears to be at risk.

The University wants to eliminate barriers for students who may be hesitant to seek medical or emergency help or report the incident to university officials because they fear being held accountable for policy violations (e.g., drinking alcoholic beverages). To encourage reporting, George Fox pursues a policy of offering students who are accessing help for themselves or others, conditional immunity from being charged with policy violations related to the particular incident. While there may be no community accountability sanctions for these individuals, the University may provide elements of help, support, and education.

Reporting Methods

Alleged survivors may use confidential on-campus or off-campus resources, or file a report with Student Life. Individuals wishing to receive confidential help and support can use any of the confidential options listed below. Student Life personnel are prepared to journey with the student to provide support, as well as assist the student in all aspects of reporting, up to and including the incident being investigated and the alleged perpetrator confronted.

Emergency Reporting:

Students who have been sexually assaulted or are in immediate danger should contact:

  • Newberg-Dundee Police Department: 911
  • GFU Security Services: 503-554-2090

Student Life Reporting:

Students choosing to report a sexual assault to Student Life may contact any of the following Student Life personnel:

  • Mark Pothoff, Dean of Community Life, Stevens 3rd floor, 503-554-2313 (8am – 5pm, M-F)
  • David Johnstone, Associate Dean of Students/Director of Residence Life, Stevens 3rd floor, 503-554-2315 (8am – 5pm, M-F)

The following professional staff live on-campus and may be contacted at any time:

  • Sarah Taylor, Associate Director of Residence Life/Area Coordinator – Houses & Apartments East, 503-554-3841
  • Matt Dyment, Associate Director of Residence Life/Area Coordinator – Coffin & Edwards Halls, 503-554-3839
  • Grant Burns, Area Coordinator – Houses & Apartments West, 503-554-3837
  • Bree Stairs, Area Coordinator – Hobson, Macy & Sutton Halls, 503-554-3840
  • Elizabeth Anderson, Area Coordinator – Pennington, Carey, Willcuts & Beebe Halls, 503-554-3541
  • Assistant Area Coordinators & Resident Assistants – AACs & RAs can be an initial contact and they’ll assist the student in connecting with the student life staff.

Confidential On-campus Resources:

The following departments and individual employees provide confidential on-campus support and assistance for all alleged survivors and alleged perpetrators of sexual assault:

  • Health & Counseling Center (Medical & counseling needs) – Woodward House, 503-554-2340 (8am – 5pm, M-F)
  • Spiritual and Intercultural Life – Sheridan St. House, 503-554-2320 (8am – 5pm, M-F); Jamie Noling-Auth, University Pastor and Dean of Spiritual and Intercultural Life, jnolingauth@georgefox.edu

Confidential Off-Campus Resources:

Police Reporting

Students are encouraged to file a police report and can speak to any of the Student Life contacts above for assistance, or directly contact the Newberg-Dundee Police Department at 503-538-8321. A specially trained detective will assist individuals in filing a report.

Medical Assistance

Following a sexual assault, the most important concern is for the health, safety, and care of the survivor. As difficult as it can be, we strongly encourage students to seek medical assistance at the Providence Newberg Hospital Emergency Room (or at the nearest hospital) immediately following a sexual assault. A medical examination is vital for the health and well-being of the sexual assault survivor, and also will offer assistance to law enforcement if a report is made. A medical examination is an important element of obtaining evidence if a person desires to press charges.

While the first inclination of a survivor may be to take a shower, it’s important to not wash, shower, bathe or douche; or to change, destroy or clean the clothes worn during the assault before having the exam. Forensic medical exams need to be conducted within 72 hours of an assault in order to obtain any evidence. It is important to bring a change of clothing if the person goes to the hospital. It may be necessary for the nurse or police to keep the clothes worn during the assault. If the person has already changed clothes, the articles of clothing that were worn can be brought in a paper bag.

Specially trained nurses generally conduct sexual assault medical examinations. Normally, there is no cost to the survivor and it is not documented through the person’s health insurance. Survivors can request an advocate be present to assist during the exam. These exams can be performed without a report to law enforcement, and evidence can be collected and held for up to six months through an anonymous collection process. This gives the survivor time to consider whether to report the incident to law enforcement.

Community Policies

Back to top

Alcohol, Drugs and Tobacco

George Fox University is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy educational environment free from alcohol, drugs and tobacco. The use, possession, or distribution of alcoholic beverages and illicit drugs, including marijuana, synthetic marijuana or controlled substances, or the abuse of legal substances, are prohibited on or away from campus. Marijuana prescribed for medical use, also known as medical marijuana, is prohibited regardless of any state's laws permitting marijuana to be used for medicinal purposes.

The university prohibits smoking, including e-cigarettes/vapor cigarettes, and all forms of tobacco use or possession everywhere on-campus; as well as off-campus by students.

Visitors to our campus are expected to comply with these standards.

Responding to Alcohol Incidents

There may be situations where a student’s actions, words, behavior, and/or other contributing factors (such as the smell of alcohol on their person or breath) are consistent with a person who has consumed alcohol, but he/she denies drinking when confronted. In these instances, if two or more student life personnel have sufficient reason to believe a student has consumed alcohol the student may be held accountable for violating the lifestyle standards unless they can demonstrate they have not consumed alcohol. This may be accomplished by the student requesting to take a voluntary breathalyzer test, or being presented with the option of taking the test by student life personnel, in order to prove their assertion. If she/he chooses to not take the test, the student may be held accountable for drinking alcohol based on the original evidence that prompted the confrontation.

A breathalyzer test may only be administered when the student has requested to do so or has agreed to take it when presented with the option by student life personnel. A trained GFU Security Officer administers the test in a private setting with another student life member present.

In instances where there is sufficient evidence that a student consumed alcohol, or when a breathalyzer tests affirms a student was drinking, student life personnel ensures the student is accompanied by appropriate personnel to a safe place.

Rationale for Breathalyzer Test

The reasons for implementing the option of using a breathalyzer in response to undergraduate student alcohol incidents are outlined below.

  • Provides an option for students who assert he/she has not consumed alcohol, but his/her behavior and actions exhibit signs to the contrary.
  • Provides staff with an option to present to students if she/he denies consuming alcohol, but his/her actions and behavior exhibit signs of consumption.

Breathalyzer FAQ

Was the breathalyzer being implemented because drinking has increased at George Fox?

  • No, we have not seen an increase in the use of alcohol at GFU.

Will students be forced to take the test?

  • No. The breathalyzer test is voluntary and students will not be forced to take it.

When and where will the test be used?

  • It may be used at any time on-campus or at specific off-campus university sponsored events (i.e., dances). A trained GFU Security Officer administers the test in a private setting with another student life staff member present.

Does Student Life anticipate the breathalyzer being used frequently in incidents involving alcohol?

  • No. The breathalyzer may only be offered as an option when a student’s actions and behavior exhibit signs of alcohol use, but he/she is denying that claim. Using the recent past as an indicator, it’s likely the option may be presented in a few situations each year. Even when the voluntary test is presented, the student has the choice of whether or not to proceed.

Will Student Life offer this option to students in all alcohol incidents?

  • No. Please see the policy for the criteria of when the breathalyzer test may be used.

Questions?

  • Please contact the dean of community life or associate dean of students in the Student Life Office.

Bullying

Bullying is unwanted, repetitive and/or aggressive behaviors that intimidate, intentionally harm, attack, or control another person physically, emotionally or socially. This behavior can often be discriminatory towards protected attributes as outlined in the university’s harassment and discrimination policy. It often involves an imbalance of power that is directed towards a specific person or group.

Actions may include, but are not limited to the following: making threats, spreading rumors, attacking someone physically or verbally, inappropriate sexual comments, taunting, spreading rumors about someone, making mean or rude hand gestures, or physically hurting a person’s body or possessions.

Cyberbullying

Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology, which may include devices and equipment such as cell phones, computers and tablets, as well as communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat, and websites. Examples of cyber-bullying include, but are not limited to, the following: demeaning or discriminatory text messages or emails, rumors sent by email or posted on social networking sites, and embarrassing pictures, videos, websites, or fake profiles.

Dances

The Associated Student Community sponsors several dances during the year according to the guidelines approved by the university administration and board of trustees. Along with these events, the university also endorses these other expressions of dance in the co-curricular and academic programs such as: choreography in drama, musical productions, cultural activities, events sponsored by the office of student life, aerobics classes, and rally routines.

Other than the above-mentioned instances, organized dancing is not permitted on campus nor is it to be sponsored at off-campus facilities. The university highly discourages students from visiting dance clubs or similar venues. Any questions regarding what is appropriate may be directed to the dean of community life or associate dean of students.

Gambling

Gambling is viewed as an unwise use of God-given resources and as a practice marked by greed. Therefore, gambling is not acceptable in any form.

Hazing

George Fox supports activities that are designed to develop community and to impart group traditions. We are committed to introducing new students to campus traditions, language and customs that enhance a sense of belonging and encourage involvement in university life. Understanding this, it is our desire to accomplish the following goals as students become members of campus activities, teams or groups: 1) to help students build positive relationships with others; 2) to familiarize students with current and historical traditions; and 3) to provide an atmosphere in which students may come to understand that they are part of the George Fox history, present and future.

We will make every reasonable effort to ensure that students who voluntarily participate in campus activities and groups are treated with dignity and respect, in accordance with the university’s mission, and that any induction or other activities fit within the mission statement as well as within common and civil law. Thus, induction and other group activities will be governed by the following expectations.

There is to be no behavior that causes, or is likely to cause, bodily danger or physical harm, or serious mental or emotional harm, regardless of a person’s willingness to participate. Even if a participant claims that no one was forced to partake, such an activity or behavior is still considered hazing. Groupthink behavior, peer pressure and coercion often play a role. Specifically, please note the following:

  • Activity that may cause bodily danger or physical harm includes physical activity such as (but not limited to) forced calisthenics or exposure to the elements, sleep deprivation or confinement. It also includes the forced consumption or application of food, liquid, alcohol or harmful substances.
  • Mental or emotional harm includes embarrassment, ridicule, verbal abuse and personal humiliation.
  • No activities are allowed that induce, cause or require students to violate local, state or federal law or campus rules and regulations.
  • Only currently enrolled George Fox students may be involved in team or group-induction activities, unless they are given explicit permission to include others by their group advisor, coach or instructor.

Violation of this policy could also be a violation of Oregon state law, which may result in a student’s loss of financial aid. Any group/club/team member violating these standards risks suspension from group/team activities. Consequences may also involve sanctions for the entire group. Violations of the Hazing Policy for Oregon State Law will be assumed to constitute violations of university policy, as well.

If you have any questions regarding campus policies or procedures, please contact the dean of community life or the associate dean of students.

Modest Dress

When attending classes or university activities, relaxing, or exercising on university grounds, students are asked to respect their fellow community members by choosing appropriate and discreet attire.

Movies and Music: Discernment Policy

Movies (theater and home movie format):
Because film is one of the principle forms of art and entertainment in American culture, the university encourages students to think seriously about the artistic merits as well as the moral and philosophical implications of the films viewed. Students are admonished to select films of aesthetic and ethical interest that offer an important perspective on contemporary culture. It is expected that individuals will diligently use Christian principles in selecting films. The university reserves the right to prohibit movies that are not rated if their content is contrary to the university's mission and policies.

All community members are expected to abstain from all NC-17 and X-rated movies (on and off campus).

Public viewing: It should be noted that it is illegal to show films in public venues unless rights and appropriate fees are paid. Watching movies within student living areas is permissible as long as they are not viewed in public places. Because of copyright laws, movies may be viewed only in a student's room or in the living rooms of apartments and houses.

On-campus viewing: Special consideration and sensitivity should be used when choosing films to be viewed on campus. Those people who live within the same apartment, house or room may be more sensitive and have a different view of issues held within the discernment policy - violence, language, etc.

Pornography

Pornographic materials in any form (including the internet) are not to be viewed, used, possessed, or distributed on or away from campus. This includes any item (which may include sexually provocative or explicit material) whose content is exploitive or of concern to either gender. Further, the use of institutional or personal computers for the viewing, transmission, retrieval and/or storage of such material is prohibited.

As with other sexual conduct outside the confines of marriage, viewing of pornography is inconsistent with the teaching of Scripture. As with other sexual misconduct, we will seek to be redemptive in the lives of the individuals involved. Consequently, the University will offer counsel and assistance to support and strengthen the individual‘s resolve to live consistently with Christian teaching on sexuality.

Pregnancy

Scripture urges believers to seek wise and godly counsel when faced with significant or difficult life choices. Therefore, should a George Fox student become pregnant while unmarried, she is encouraged to communicate with the dean of community life, the associate dean of students or with the Health and Counseling Center. These offices are prepared to assist both the mother and the father as they consider the results of their actions, deal with the consequences, and experience the forgiveness that comes through repentance.

The university is committed to responding in a redemptive manner, seeking to balance compassion with accountability. Students can expect to be treated with Christian love as they deal with their new circumstances. Every effort will be made to ensure confidentiality, but the life and health of the mother and child and the spiritual well-being of the parents are our primary concerns. While some students in these circumstances may choose to leave the university temporarily, it is our hope that any student who chooses to continue in classes during pregnancy will find George Fox to be a supportive and redemptive community during this crucial time

Protests

George Fox University recognizes the right of students and other members of the university community to express their views or peacefully protest against actions and opinions with which they disagree. The university also stresses a concurrent obligation to maintain an on-campus atmosphere conducive to academic work, to preserve the dignity and seriousness of the university ceremonies and public exercises, and to respect the rights of all individuals.

Sexuality & Relationships

George Fox University accepts the biblical standards that prohibit all sexual immorality. Please see the Lifestyle Standards and Values for a more complete description of the University’s important biblical values in this area. Recognizing there are many social and emotional forces that challenge this standard, we believe the power of God and the wisdom of the Holy Spirit combine to provide the means to live victoriously with respect to sexual purity. In addition to what’s outlined in the Lifestyle Standards, examples of unacceptable behavior include the following:

  • Commission of or attempt to commit a sexual act that, if proven in court, would be a criminal act
  • Any student involved with the use, distribution, or participation of pornography in any form
  • An unmarried student involved in a sexually active relationship
  • A married student involved in a sexually active adulterous relationship
  • An unmarried or married student who chooses abortion for other than medical reasons
  • An unmarried male or female student involved in a pregnancy
  • Cohabitation on or off-campus is unacceptable for students. It is defined as, but not limited to: spending the night together or living with romantically or sexually involved partners and/or members of the opposite sex.

Situations are evaluated individually by the dean of community life or his or her staff. Accountability and consequences are administered appropriately with the growth and development of each student in mind.

Administrative Policies

Back to top

Automobiles and Parking

All vehicles brought to campus, whether owned by employees, students, or the university, must be registered with Security Services.

For information about registering your vehicle, the Campus Traffic and Parking Regulations, or appealing a parking ticket, please visit the Security Services parking page or go to security.georgefox.edu.

Babysitting and Childcare

Because of safety concerns and insurance limitations, facilitating on-campus childcare is not permitted.

Computers and Technology

Internet access and use is considered a privilege. While computers have become a great asset to the educational environment, one must be aware of the pitfalls of technology. Students are charged with the responsibility to use them with discretion and wisdom.

The university believes it is unacceptable to misuse computers or other mediums of communication (mail service or phone systems) for the purpose of harassment; use, possession, or distribution of pornography; plagiarism; any other violations of the community standards; or any violations of state or federal law. The university does not guarantee privacy on the university network or e-mail, and reserves the right to monitor and search any network traffic or files.

For other specific policies regarding computer use, please see the university's Network Usage and Access Policy.

More information can also be found at the Institutional Technology (IT) web page at it.georgefox.edu.

Video and computer games should be played while considering the balance of all other aspects required of you. Students are encouraged to guard their time carefully and balance recreation with academic work and social development.

Student Organizations and Clubs

For most students the University experience is greatly enhanced through participation in co-curricular activities. George Fox University views this participation as essential to healthy growth and development and to the attainment of a well-rounded education. There are numerous opportunities for students to be involved and the University encourages engagement and participation through those venues. The Associated Student Community (ASC) is one important avenue for such involvement and recognizes several student clubs and organizations each year.

As a Christ-centered community, the existence and activities of all clubs and organizations are ultimately authorized by the Student Life Office and must be consistent with the values, lifestyle expectations, Christ-centered commitments and community policies found in the Student Handbook studenthandbook.georgefox.edu. These expectations and policies govern the personal conduct of all undergraduate students and student organizations at GFU. Clubs must also meet standards of safety as defined by the University.

Safety and Security

Back to top

General Safety and Facilities

Within our campus community, there are numerous issues regarding safety within academic, residential and auxiliary buildings. Students are expected to comply with all day-to-day policies and procedures. This includes, but is not limited to the following: appropriate entry, access and use of university facilities; as well as wearing appropriate attire, including shoes in buildings. The University also prohibits activities such as: climbing interior or exterior walls of buildings or campus structures; climbing through windows; or being on any building roof or ledge.

Fire Safety

In regard to fire safety, it is expected that community members will work to promote a healthy and safe campus environment, specifically avoiding behaviors that may put another community member at risk. Any interference with the normal operation of a fire alarm system and/or inappropriate and unauthorized use of firefighting equipment is prohibited and considered by the university to be serious and unacceptable behavior.

Furthermore, students are not permitted to discharge any type of fireworks or explosives in and around buildings, tamper with a building's electrical system, burn incense or have open flames (including candles) in or near campus buildings (with the exception of residence hall fireplaces), refuse to participate in or obstruct any fire drills, use open-coil appliances, or place any motorized vehicle in a building or on a porch.

All these behaviors violate the fire safety code and may be subject to fines, compensation for damages, and/or other appropriate responses.

Please Note:  Refusal to evacuate when a fire alarm sounds will be a $100.00 (minimum) fine per incident. Failure to comply with requests from authorized personnel during drills will be $100.00 (minimum) fine per incident.  

Failure to comply with requests from authorized personnel in an emergency may result in citation and fine under Oregon statutes.

Non-Motorized Transportation

Non-motorized modes of transportation (including bicycles, roller blades, and scooters) are allowed on campus, but are prohibited from being ridden in any campus building.

Skateboarding, including longboarding, is prohibited in the Quad area of campus that is bordered by Carlton Way, Sheridan Street, Meridian Street, and North Street. Skateboarding is permitted as a mode of transportation in other areas of campus providing the wheels stay in contact with the ground at all times while riding. Students are encouraged to utilize the skate park located in Newberg.

All non-motorized modes of transportation must be operated in a respectful and safe manner on campus property, and should yield to pedestrians.

Security and Crime Statistics

In compliance with the Clery Act, crime statistics and security policies are available on the Security Services office look online at security.georgefox.edu.

Theft

Theft or damage to property of another, including members of the university community or on university premises is not permissible. Cases of theft should be reported to the police and Security Services.

Students can help prevent theft by the following Property Theft Prevention guidelines on the Security Services site.

Weapons and Fire Arms

The safety and security of all members of our community is of utmost importance. The university prohibits the possession or use of firearms (including air rifles, air soft pistols, and paint guns), ammunition, or other types of weapons or explosives in or upon university-owned or university-supervised property.

Any weapons, firearms or items that fire a hard projectile or paint ball, may be confiscated by university personnel.

Large knives or swords are prohibited on-campus, including all residential buildings. Small pocket knives (less than 4” blade) are permitted on-campus.

Residence Life

Back to top

Residence life at George Fox University is an integral part of your education and your overall university experience. The residential community provides unique and meaningful experiences in relationships, along with various opportunities to discover your potential, strengths and philosophy of life. The diversity of the residence halls, suites, apartments, and houses provides challenging opportunities for individual growth and development while maintaining a common bond of university residency.

Threefold Focus

  1. We are committed to providing a home that is physically safe for you. In cooperation with campus security, plant services and local services such as the fire, police and emergency crews, we strive to provide a place of residence which is a physical haven for you.
  2. Beyond physical safety, we want to create a place of security. Our definition of security is linked to the developing of solid and deep relationships; feeling a sense of belonging; being part of the community; seeing GFU a place of refuge; and being in a place of intimacy with God, peers, faculty and staff.
  3. Once safety and security are established, we have observed that significance is vastly important. Residence Life, and the campus community in general, desires to help students understand their role in campus life and in our society and world. Having a purpose and significance is critical for a person's education and well-being. Our hope is that you will be able to embrace a myriad of roles in a safe and secure environment.

Residence Life Staff

Professional Staff

Area Coordinators
Each living area is staffed by a full-time area coordinator, who is an administrator who has extensive training in being an effective educator qualified to give assistance to academic, social, spiritual, and personal needs of students.

Student Staff

Assistant Area Coordinator

Each living area is also staffed by a returning Residence Life student leader. They are responsible for various administrative details, staff development, and residential programming.

Resident Assistants

Each community - floor, wing, apartment complex, house, etc. - on campus has a resident assistant, a student carefully selected and trained to contribute to the success of each student's living and learning experience. The ratio of student staff to residents averages 1 to 22.

Residence Life Information and Policies

Alcohol, Drugs and Tobacco

George Fox University is a dry campus. It has chosen to be a drug- and alcohol-free institution and is committed to upholding the federal Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act. Please see the Alcohol, Drugs and Tobacco section of the handbook for the complete policy.

Bicycles

Bicycles may be locked up at the bike racks or stored in residence hall rooms. If bicycles are stored in rooms, they must be carried from outside to the room. Bicycles may not be left in hallways, as this is a fire hazard. Edwards, Macy, Sutton, Pennington, University, Hobson, and Carey Halls have covered bicycle racks.

The city of Newberg requires all bicycle owners to register their bikes at the police department. There is no charge. Repair shops are close to campus.

No bicycles are permitted on pedestrian accesses, and inside of any university buildings.

Computer Use

When utilizing a personal computer in university housing, students are encouraged to use surge protectors (see Computer Use).

Decorations

Students may decorate their residences according to their own personal tastes. All decorations, including posters, hangings, etc., must be mutually agreed upon by any and all roommates [also see section in Anti- Harassment Policy with regards to the creation of a "hostile environment"]. However, nothing is to be glued, nailed, or in any way permanently attached to ceilings or walls. Students are also prohibited from painting any part of their living area (e.g., walls, furniture, etc.). Note: Department of Transportation highway and street signs are protected by law. Having possession of or displaying these signs is considered a felony and is therefore not permitted.

Furniture

Each student living on campus is supplied with the necessary residence furnishings (bed, desk, dresser, closet, as well as all kitchen and living room furnishings in the apartments and houses). It should be noted that furniture differs throughout campus housing. Please note that students are prohibited from bringing personal soft furniture like couches and chairs because of the increased risk of bed bugs.

Generally, the university provides only the furniture a student has in their place of residence when they check in. Ironing boards are located in each laundry facility, and vacuum cleaners are provided for use in the living areas.

Students may wish to bring their own phones, irons, study lamps. Note: Halogen lamps of any kind are not permitted due to fire concerns.

University-owned furniture is not to be moved outside the rooms, due to a shortage of storage space and the risk of damage. Under no circumstances is furniture to be disassembled. The University Store rents small refrigerators to students living in residence halls and suites. Generally, due to fire concerns, space heaters are not permitted in student housing.

Guests

Guests of students are the responsibility of the student hosting the visit. All overnight visitors are expected to check in with the Area Coordinator.

Visitors can stay for up to three consecutive days if approved by the Area Coordinator. Visits by prospective students should be arranged through the Admissions Office. No person of the opposite sex is to stay overnight in a student's room, apartment, or house.

Noise

In keeping with our responsibility toward one another, students should be mindful of their neighbors, keeping the volume of radios, stereos, etc., at a considerate level. If they can be heard in another apartment or room, they are too loud. Bouncing of balls and other noises that are disturbing to the community are also prohibited.

Use of musical instruments such as drums, bongos, electric guitars, etc., is prohibited in all student housing, unless they are being used for an activity approved by the area coordinator such as a praise and worship gathering [see Quiet Hours].

Pets

Only small fish and turtles are allowed as pets in student housing. Guests are to keep their animals outside. An unauthorized pet will result in a fine of $50.

Pranks

While there are many fun and creative activities to engage in while living on campus, students are encouraged to promote an environment where respect for property and each individual community member is valued. Therefore, pranks are discouraged.

Quiet Hours

The quiet hours for all campus housing are daily from 10 p.m. to 9 a.m. During this time, the noise level should be appropriate for those students who are studying or sleeping. Questions regarding what is appropriate can be directed to members of the Residence Life staff.

Televisions and Cable TV 

Students are permitted to have televisions in their residence. Cable television is permitted only in campus houses and apartments pending the approval of student life staff. Please see the Area Coordinator in your living area for a copy of the cable television policy. Satellite dishes are prohibited in all campus housing.

Visitation

George Fox University allows some visitation access to residence housing to members of the opposite sex. Although some residents would ask for more visitation hours, there are also others who do not want their privacy invaded by the opposite sex. The visitation hours, as stated below, attempt to strike a balance between the two. The goal is to allow for healthy interaction in the area that students call home.

Residence Halls: Open-house visitation hours are 3 to 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 3 p.m. to midnight on Friday, and noon to midnight on Saturday and Sunday. No person is allowed on the wing/floor, hallways, or stairwells of a living area of the opposite sex except during open-house visitation hours. The door to the student's room must be completely open at all times when visitors of the opposite sex are present.

Suites: Open-house visitation hours are 3 to 11 p.m. Monday through Thursday, 3 p.m. to midnight on Friday, and noon to midnight on Saturday and Sunday. Visitors of the opposite sex are to confine their visits to the front room of the suite after 10 p.m. All room doors must be completely open at all times when visitors of the opposite sex are present.

Houses and Apartments: Visitation hours are noon to midnight Sunday through Thursday, and noon to 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday. Visitors of the opposite sex are to confine their visits to the living/dining room areas after 10 p.m. Room doors must be completely open at all times when visitors of the opposite sex are present.

Those found in violation of this policy may be held accountable through the community accountability process.

Detailed Fine List

Housing related:

  • Unauthorized tampering with fire safety equipment: $100.00 + damage
  • Burning in student housing (incense, candles, cigarettes, etc)                                 
    • $25.00 (1st); $50.00 (2nd); $100.00 (3rd)                                                        
    • After first violation it becomes a lifestyle issue
  • Unintentional damage to campus property:   cost of repair
  • Intentional damage to campus property:  $50.00 + cost of repair
  • Unauthorized removal of university property:   $25.00 + damage
  • Storage of motorized vehicles inside housing (includes porches):  $100.00 + damage
  • Unauthorized removal of room screens:   $25.00
  • Damage to screens:  $50.00 (replacement)
  • Missed mandatory meeting (2 per yr.):  $10.00
  • Unauthorized room change:  $50.00
  • Unauthorized early move-in:  $50.00
  • Authorized early move –in:  $35.00
  • Unauthorized staying on campus:  $50.00 per night
  • Authorized staying on campus:   $35.00 per night
  • Unauthorized guest:   $35.00 per night
  • Unauthorized access to buildings when closed:   $25.00; $50.00 (if at night)
  • Unauthorized access to roof or ledge:  $50.00

Lifestyle related

  • Incomplete community hour:  $10.00 per hour
  • Possession of fire arm, paintball, air soft on campus:
    • 1st – Confiscation until taken home; 2nd + $25.00

NOTE: During the last week of classes, all housing and lifestyle violations or other required accountability consequences are turned into fines.

Housing

Back to top

Off-Campus Housing Policy

  • Juniors (62+ credit hours completed) and students 20 years old or older prior to the first day of the semester will be able to select off-campus housing through their housing form in myGFU. Students 23 years old or older will automatically be assigned off-campus housing.
  • Students in their third year out of high school should email housing@georgefox.edu in order to be considered for off-campus housing.
  • Married students who are not juniors and who are under 20 years of age should email housing@georgefox.edu in order to be considered for off-campus housing.

Spring Semester

All requests for off-campus housing for spring semester should be sent to housing@georgefox.edu.

It is expected that all students who live off campus abide by the university's lifestyle policies.

Those students who live off campus and choose to violate the policies may have their approval to live off campus revoked and be required to return to university housing, or face other disciplinary action deemed appropriate by the Student Life office.

Please refer to the Off-Campus Information page for more details in this area.

Housing Facilities

Le Shana Hall is situated in the northeast corner of campus. A three-story residence hall, it provides housing for 120 upper-division students in 20 six-person apartments. Each apartment is composed of three bedrooms, a bathroom, a kitchen, and a living room. There is also a lobby area and cafe on the bottom floor.

Edwards Hall is a three-story, two-wing residence hall that houses 54 women in one wing and 54 men in the other. Laundry rooms and kitchens are located on the first floor of each wing. The two wings are joined by a lobby, with the assistant area coordinator's apartment directly attached. Edwards is located east of the Student Union Building.

Pennington Hall is a two-story, two-wing residence hall that houses 56 men and 56 women. The wings are joined by a lobby, with the area coordinator's apartment directly attached. It has a laundry room and kitchen located in the building. Pennington is located just south of the Student Union Building.

Hobson Hall is a three-story residence hall that houses 84 women. It has a full basement, which houses the kitchen and laundry room, and is part of the Hobson-Macy-Sutton complex located on the east side of campus.

Macy Hall is a three-story residence hall that houses 78 women and is part of the Hobson-Macy-Sutton complex. It has a kitchen and laundry room on each floor.

Sutton Hall is a three-story residence hall that houses 60 men. Sutton has both two-person and four-person rooms. There is a kitchen and laundry room located on each floor. It is the central building of the Hobson-Macy-Sutton complex. It has a large lobby--with the area coordinator's apartment directly attached--and a full basement.

Coffin Hall is a three-story, two-wing residence hall located on the northeast corner of campus. The two wings are joined by a lobby. Coffin Hall houses 124 students. Each floor has a kitchen, study room, and laundry facilities.

Suites

Beebe Hall is a three-story living area housing 40 upper-division students. The rooms are fully carpeted and are divided into suites consisting of a bedroom, study room, and bathroom. Each suite is designed to house four students. There is a kitchen, laundry room, study room, and lounge on each floor. Beebe Hall is located adjacent to Carey Hall and Willcuts Hall in the Hess Creek canyon.

Carey Hall is a two-story living area that houses 32 upper-division students. Its facilities are the same as Beebe and Willcuts halls.

Willcuts Hall is a three-story living area housing 40 upper-division students. Its facilities are the same as Beebe and Carey halls.

Apartments and Houses

The University maintains on-campus apartments and houses for student residents. These living areas house mostly returning students. All of the apartments and houses are fully furnished, with laundry facilities available in close proximity to each living area.

Housing Information and Policies

Breaks, Holidays and Residence Hall Closures

Generally, all residence halls and suites close at noon on the day after the last day in the semester and reopen at noon on the Sunday before the first day in the new semester.

The residence halls also close for spring break at noon on the day after the end of the week before spring break and open at noon the day before classes resume. There is no food service during these school breaks.

All apartments and houses remain open and accessible to their residents during these school breaks.

Housing Assignments

The process of signing up for housing for the following year occurs in March. The process is administered through the Office of Student Life. Each student is notified through email prior to the housing sign-up process. Inquiries should be directed to the Director of Housing.

Keys

There is a $10 charge for each unreturned or lost key. A $45 re-keying fee will be added when a housing key is lost. When students leave the campus for the year - whether withdrawing during the year or leaving at the end of the year - they must return the room, outside door, and laundry keys to their resident assistant.

The mailbox key should be returned to the SUB post office, and any building keys issued by Plant Services should be returned there to Plant Services. SUB master and building master keys carry a larger fine when lost. Note that duplicating, carrying, or using unauthorized keys is a violation of university policy and is considered a serious offense.

Laundry

Laundry facilities are located in close proximity to housing units and living areas. The University attempts to keep costs low and maintain the machines. Laundry facilities are operated by electronic cards. Students receive a pre-loaded card during check-in.

If card is lost, add-value cards may be purchased in the Student Union Building and in the Sutton Hall lobby.

Linens

Students must provide their own linens and laundry supplies. Note: There are two sizes of beds available in the residence halls and suites: 36" x 78" (standard) and 38" x 80" (extra long).

Lock-up of Residence Halls

Residence halls are locked at all times. Students may enter the residence hall where they live by using the card lock system. Phones are provided outside the residence halls to contact students in that area. Each living area other than apartments or houses is staffed by a resident assistant on duty from 8 p.m. to 8 a.m.

Residents are furnished with a key or an ID card that gives them access to their residence hall.

Lofts

Lofts, both manufactured and hand built, are not permitted in university housing. Beds must not be propped up or stacked with concrete blocks.

Loss and Theft Liability

The university accepts no responsibility for any loss or damage to personal possessions whether caused by theft, fire, flood, or other disasters. The resident is responsible for obtaining his/her own insurance for personal belongings. Information regarding the purchase of student personal property insurance from an outside agency may be obtained from the Office of Student Life.

Meals Plans and Food Service

Resident Meal Plans

The on-campus program has been designed to be flexible to meet the unique needs of each student. We offer a variety of meal plans to fit your lifestyle. To inquire about meal plans and flex points, visit the Bon Appetit office located right behind the main kitchen in the Commons. You may also find more information about the meal plan program on the Student Life Website.

Meal Plan Options

Bon Appetit makes every effort to meet the dietary and scheduling needs of our students. Boxed meals may be requested when educational scheduling conflicts arise. Exemptions from the meal plan are granted for medical reasons only when Bon Appetit cannot accommodate a student's specific dietary needs as determined by a doctor.

A licensed physician must supply documentation of the petitioning student's medical condition. Anyone seeking an exemption from the meal plan must complete all necessary paperwork before the request for exemption is considered.

Accommodation forms can be found on the Student Life website.

The deadline for all exemption paperwork is the first Friday of fall semester and the first Friday of spring semester. Paperwork completed after these dates may not be considered.

PLEASE NOTE:

  • All changes to meal plans must be made by the 2nd week of each semester. Students are responsible to confirm their meal plan charges on their MyGFU account. Failure to make any changes by the last day of the add/drop period may result in charges to your account.  The Student Life Office STRONGLY urges students to confirm their charges each semester. Incorrect charges to the students account must be changed prior to the 2nd Friday of each semester. There will be no exceptions.
  • Accommodations will not be made for a student's busy schedule.  If you have a schedule conflict, students can meet with the Bon Appetit staff to arrange a boxed meal.
  • Meal plans are assigned according to completed credit hours.  
  • Students who are 21 or older prior to the first day of each semester are not required to have a meal plan.
  • Transfer students should contact Student Life Office to arrange an evaluation of their transfer credits.  Email - studentlife@georgefox.edu

All questions about meal plans should be addressed to studentlife@georgefox.edu

You may also phone Jere Witherspoon at 503-554-2316.

Right of Entrance

University personnel [area coordinators, security or student personnel under direction of professional staff] may enter and/or search a student’s room, apartment, or house without notice in emergencies where imminent danger to life, safety, health, or property is reasonably feared; when the university is closing down at breaks, or when it has been determined, at the discretion of appropriate university officials, that sufficient cause exists.

University personnel [professional staff] may enter and/or search a student’s room, apartment or house without notice when there is suspicion of probable cause to believe university regulations have been or are being violated. While it is preferred for students to be present, in rare situations searches may be conducted in the student’s absence.

When the university seeks access to students’ rooms, apartments, or houses to make repairs or improvements, the occupants generally are notified at least 24 hours in advance unless consent has been given. A work request to Plant Services is considered consent to enter. During breaks [such as Christmas and Spring Break] university personnel may enter university housing in order to routinely assess the condition of fire alarms, smoke detectors, etc.

Room Changes

Room changes for fall semester may begin on the third Monday of September, and conclude on the third Friday of October. Room changes for spring semester begin on the fourth Monday of January, and conclude on the fourth Friday of February. Note: Generally, no room change petitions are considered as long as any students are living in temporary housing.

If you wish to change rooms or living areas, you must pick up a Room Change form from your area coordinator and follow the procedure as detailed on the form. Students are not to move until they have received written approval from the area coordinator. Students wanting to change rooms will be expected to find another room in which to move. Failure to follow the room change procedures will result in a $50 charge.

Screens

Screens are provided in many campus housing facilities. Unless there is an emergency (e.g., a fire), the screens should not be removed. Students who occupy the specific rooms are responsible for their screens. Screens found to be bent, damaged, lost, or removed may result in a minimum $50 charge per occurrence.

Student ID Cards

All students are issued a George Fox University ID card. An ID card can be obtained at the IT (Institutional Technology) Department on the 3rd floor of Stevens Center during their normal hours of operation. It is required for:

  • Eating on the university's food service plan
  • Entering the residence hall where they live
  • Checking out books from the Murdock Learning Resource Center, requesting books from Summit, and borrowing from other libraries
  • Scanning for attendance at Spiritual Formation activities (e.g., chapel)
  • Entering the Wheeler Sports Center
  • Admission to athletics events
  • Entering the residence halls, Prayer Chapel, Edwards-Holman Science Center, Ross Center, Bauman Auditorium, the SUB and SUB basement, Wheeler Sports Center, and Stevens Center
  • Basic identification on campus to security personnel

Pre-approved entry locations

The following areas must have preapproval for entry due to work study or academic needs: Bauman, Brougher, EHSC, Media Center, North Street Annex, Pottery lab, Ross Center, Stevens Center, Wood-Mar Hall

Theft or Loss of ID Card

The student ID card is nontransferable. By using the card, a student agrees to these published terms and conditions governing its use. Should the card become lost, immediately report it missing to the food service office during business hours of 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. on weekdays. Should it be stolen, please report the theft to security (ext. 2090), food service (ext. 2500), and the locksmith (ext. 2059). In addition, if lost, a meal voucher must be requested at the food service office until a new card is obtained. When an ID card is replaced, the old card is automatically deactivated.

Care of Card

The ID card must be cared for throughout a student's length of stay at George Fox University. The magnetic encoding can be damaged if the strip is placed next to bank cards. Cardholder key chains may be purchased in the University Store.

It is highly recommended to carry ID cards in a lanyard. Replacement cards will be charged to any students who have defaced the card or have obviously mistreated it.

ID Card Replacement

If the card becomes unusable, damaged or stolen, the student is responsible for the cost of replacement. Replacement photo ID cards are available for a $20 fee in the IT (Institutional Technology) department on the 3rd floor of the Stevens Center, open weekdays. The cost will be charged to the student's account. Call the IT department at 554-2569 for ID card questions.

Storage

Articles must be boxed and clearly labeled with a university label indicating the name and permanent address of the owner. The university does not have the space for general storage. Students should not plan to bring an abundance of belongings. Articles may be stored over the summer months when space is available. Only students living 300 miles or more from the university may store items, and preference for summer storage is given to students living out of state. Students may store no more than 5 boxes in campus storage. Generally, articles are kept no more than one semester following a student's absence. Articles left in storage for more than one semester may be given away. Carpets and bicycles may not be stored and will be disposed. The university is not responsible for lost, stolen, or damaged items.

Work Requests

RAs should be contacted with work requests for maintenance. Plant Services usually responds during four working days; however, if they are flooded with requests (like at the beginning of the school year), response may take a bit longer.

Student Handbook FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: If I want to get involved with a club on campus, whom should I talk with about it?

A: You can talk with the advisor of the club, or one of the student representatives. You can find out who these individuals are by contacting the ASC Central Committee, ext. 3001, or stop by their offices in the Student Union Building.

Q: If I want to become involved in student leadership, what opportunities are there on campus?

A: There are numerous opportunities for students to become involved in leadership on campus, ranging from ASC (Associated Student Community) to involvement in the ADVANCE Leadership Development Program. (See Student Leadership for more specific information).

Q: If I am visiting my family over a break or holiday, do I still have to abide by the University Lifestyle Agreement?

A: The university understands that some families may have differing expectations in regard to some aspects of the lifestyle agreement. In this instance (while the student is at home), the student may act under the direction of his/her parent(s) or legal guardian(s).

Q: Can I visit my friends of the opposite sex in other living areas?

A: In University housing, visitation hours are set and outlined clearly for students. It is expected that students will respect and adhere to the set hours.

Q: Can I watch R-rated movies in my living area?

A: The university discourages the use of the industry rating code as a guide in determining which films are acceptable. Students are admonished to select films of aesthetic and ethical interest that offer an important perspective on contemporary culture. It is expected that individuals will diligently use Christian principles in selecting films.

Q: If I am at a party with other students where alcohol is being served, what should I do?

A: If you are in the presence of other George Fox students who are consuming alcohol, you may be held accountable as an active participant in violating the lifestyle standards. In an instance such as this one, the university believes you should remove yourself from the situation. Students are reminded that peer accountability is strongly encouraged.

 Q: When do I sign up for housing?

A: Returning students sign up for housing in the spring semester (for the following academic year). Information regarding housing selection, outlining the process and policies, is posted on the university website in the early part of spring semester.

Q: How do I get permission to live off campus?

A: Only those students meeting the criteria (mainly commuters and seniors) will be permitted to live off-campus, as long as they apply within the stated time frames. George Fox is a residential university, and the residential experience is highly valued (see Off-Campus Housing Policy for additional information).

Q: Who should I talk to if I have questions about food service/meal plans?

A: You may speak with either someone from Bon Appétit (the general manager or one of his/her designees), or with the Student Life Office. Students are expected to know the deadlines for meal plan selection. This information can be found on the Meal Plan Options page. Every effort is made to accommodate student schedules and dietary needs. Students with dietary restrictions should review the meal plan accommodation process.

Q: Who should I talk to if I notice a possible error on my bill?

A: Talk with your assigned student accounts specialist. Student Financial Services is located on the first floor of the Edward F. Stevens Center. Find more information about finances at the Student Financial Services website.

Q: As a traditional undergraduate student, am I required to attend chapel services?

A: All undergraduate students are required to meet a Spiritual Formation requirement. Generally, this means earning 21 Spiritual Formation credits in each semester. These credits can be earned through participation in small-group Bible studies, serve trips, and chapel attendance. For a full description of the Spiritual Formation Program and requirements check out the Office of Spiritual Life website.

Q: As a student, what is my responsibility in communication and obtaining vital information?

A: The university strives to communicate effectively through a variety of media. Students are expected to frequently check their campus mailboxes, their personal university email accounts, and the Student News and Information email folder. These contain important information/deadlines that students are responsible to know.

Back to top

Learn more about us through the George Fox University Vimeo channel.