Hispanic Cultural Studies Minor

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Minor Requirements

18-19 credit hours

Complete the following:
This course will provide an introduction to Latina/o literature's and cultures in the United States from the 1820s to the present, paying close attention to the historical and social events that have influenced the construction of U.S. Latino/a identities. Through the examination of canonical texts produced by Chicanos, Mexican-Americans, and Hispanic Caribbean authors we will analyze questions of racial, ethnic, religious, and cultural identities in conversation with current theoretical concepts such as Diaspora, border identities, strategic essentialism, imagined communities, code-switching, oppositional consciousness, and double-consciousness.
Choose one of the following:
An integrated introductory study of Spanish. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are all integral to learning the language. Cultural aspects of Spain and Latin America are also presented as essential components. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: placement exam required.
An integrated introductory study of Spanish. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are all integral to learning the language. Cultural aspects of Spain and Latin America are also presented as essential components. At the end of SPAN 102, students should have novice high proficiency as defined by the American Council of the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 Introductory Spanish I or placement by exam.
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 Introductory Spanish II or placement by exam.
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of SPAN 202, students should have intermediate mid proficiency as defined by ACTFL. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I or placement by exam.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or placement by exam.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 Intermediate/Advanced Spanish I or placement by exam.
This course examines the Latino populations of the U.S. and develops academic Spanish for those who learned Spanish outside of a formal school setting. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Placement by testing or instructor permission.
Choose four of the following:

Notes:

  • Hispanic Cultural Studies students in certain courses below will focus their individual research and/or presentations on Hispanic populations in the U.S. or on Latin America(ns). Please see your Hispanic Cultural Studies faculty advisor for information on which courses that pertains to.
  • Additionally, students are restricted to taking specific topics for courses below that are selected topics courses. Again please see your Hispanic Cultural Studies faculty advisor for information on which topics will apply to the requirement.
  • Students can selected to take HIST 250 or SPAN 350 below, but only one course will count towards the minor.
  • Only LIBA 100 S (in Spanish) will apply towards the following requirement.
The first course in the liberal arts core, Knowing and Being Known, introduces students to the history and mission of George Fox University and the values and habits of mind central to a liberal arts education. The course presses each student to engage in metacognitive analysis of his or her own learning style and goals. Additional course fee required.
An introductory thematic study of the roles of music in a variety of world cultures, with emphasis on listening to, viewing, and understanding a broad selection of musical styles mostly outside the Western classical tradition.
This course introduces students to literature and philosophy as methods of human inquiry. Special focus is given to close reading of texts with an attention to literary form and on thinking and living ethically. Topics and texts vary by section.
In this course students will be introduced to basic tools and scholarly attitudes for studying the Bible and theology, using a particular biblical book, theme, or theological topic as a focus. Material will be studied not only for academic knowledge but also spiritual and personal growth. Specific topics rotate, and the course can be taken more than once with different topics. Prerequisites include any one of the following: THEO 101 I Believe; THEO 100 Bible Survey; THEO 201 Old Testament or THEO 301 New Testament.
This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
Latin American countries from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the conditions that have led to the crises of recent years.
A comparative study of world societies and their ways of life.
n introduction to the cultures and civilizations of Latin America. Students continue to develop skills toward advanced proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, field trips, and listening to native speakers. Areas of study may include history, art, music, the role of religion, governmental systems, and gender differences. Taught in Spanish. Corequisite/Prerequisite: SPAN 302 Intermediate/Advanced Spanish II or concurrent enrollment in SPAN 302 Intermediate/Advanced Spanish II or instructor's permission.
An in-depth study of a specific era or group found within Western art, such as studies in the Baroque and Rococo, Renaissance, or Women in Art. Specific topics will be dependent on the instructor's area of specialization. Additional course fee is required.
A study of the historical and socioeconomic factors experienced and lived by people of differing racial and ethnic backgrounds in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the social construction of race, social attitudes and past and present racial issues. Prerequisite: SOCI 150 Principles of Sociology or instructor's permission.
A course designed to introduce students to the nature and function of gender differences in communication on a cross-cultural basis. Examines biological, cultural, linguistic, and power theories that attempt to explain these differences. Focus given to verbal (spoken and written) language as well as nonverbal communication codes. Counts toward globalization requirement.
This course introduces students to selected masters and periods of Latin American literature and reflects on matters of faith as revealed in the pieces studied. Students continue to develop skills toward advanced proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 302 Advanced Spanish or equivalent.