Bachelors of Science in Nursing (BSN)

Overview

The nursing major offers a 97-semester-hour course of study that is designed to prepare students to function in increasingly complicated health care environments. Students are required to obtain a minimum grade of C in all courses taken for the major.

Program Objectives

Graduates with a BSN will:

  • Integrate concepts from liberal arts and sciences in promoting health and delivering individualized care
  • Utilize standards of nursing practice and current science to deliver safe, competent, patient-centered care to patients across the lifespan in a variety of settings
  • Integrate evidence, clinical judgment, and patient preferences throughout the nursing process
  • Apply information management and technology across the health continuum to facilitate high-quality nursing care
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of healthcare policy, finance, and regulatory agencies, including domestic and global healthcare trends
  • Use communication, collaboration, and organizational skills to work in partnerships with clients, families, communities, and the interprofessional healthcare team to promote health
  • Employ principles of leadership to support quality improvement, safety, and cost containment initiatives in a variety of settings
  • Demonstrate professional values that integrate lifelong learning, service, and reflective practice
  • Provide evidence-based nursing care that incorporates diversity, human dignity, and cultural humility
  • Provide holistic, empathetic nursing care that reflects the character and compassion of Christ
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Major Requirements

Complete the following:

Structure and function of the human body. Fall semester topics include basic chemistry, body organization, integument, skeleton, muscles, and the nervous system, including special senses. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Structure and function of the human body. Spring semester topics include cardiovascular, reproductive, endocrine, respiratory, urinary, and digestive systems. The course is designed for nonscience majors. Three lectures and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, or permission from instructor. Additional course fee is required.
This course covers introductory and intermediate principles of chemistry. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of general and organic chemistry that are pertinent to biochemistry. This course provides a background for students with interests in prenursing, nutrition, and related allied health areas. (This course does not meet the requirements for science majors.) Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 440 (test taken prior to March 2016), or a math SAT score of at least 480 (test taken March 2016 or later) or successful completion of MATH 180 College Algebra (or equivalent).
An introduction to the study of human communication. Application of communication principles to interpersonal, group, and public contexts. Particular emphasis on the practice of public speaking. Students will prepare and deliver several oral presentations.
An algebra course designed for students who have a good background in high school algebra and are prepared to cover the major topics of algebra in more depth and breadth. Applications of algebra will be emphasized in this course. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for the calculus sequence. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.
An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Major topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, thinking, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, social interaction, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite to most other psychology courses.

Complete the following:

A course in the structure, metabolism, classification and health aspects of microorganisms. Special emphasis will be given to human-microbe interactions and clinical aspects of infection. Methods of microbiological investigation are emphasized and include current techniques and experiences within the field of Microbiology. Course designed for students not majoring in biology. Pre-requisites: BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I; BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II; CHEM 151 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry I; and CHEM 152 General, Organic, and Biological Chemistry II; or permission of the instructor. Additional course fee required.
This course introduces students to literature and philosophy as methods of human inquiry. Special focus is given to close reading of texts with an attention to literary form and on thinking and living ethically. Topics and texts vary by section.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from infancy to old age. Will not count as part of the psychology major. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.

Choose one of the following:

An introduction to probability and statistics with content and application directed toward the natural and physical sciences. Topics to be covered include methods of describing data, probability, random variables and their distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, linearregression, and correlation. Prerequisite: MATH 180 College Algebra or equivalent.
Applied statistics for the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on statistical logic and decision making. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.
Applied statistics for the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on statistical logic and decision making. Recommended for the sophomore or junior year. Required for sociology and social work majors. (Identical to SWRK 340) Prerequisites: SOCI 150 Principles of Sociology and high school algebra.

Complete the following:

Introduction and application of theories concerning clients in need of primary, acute, and restorative nursing care. Students will be introduced to basic nursing concepts, skills, and techniques of professional nursing practice. Application of health assessment and basic nursing skills in the care of individuals experiencing alterations in biopsychosocial, cultural, and spiritual health status. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program, BIOL 367 Essentials of Microbiology and NURS 311 Pathophysiology.
Introduction to study of professional nursing as a science and as an art. Encompasses role definition of nursing based on scientific theoretical frameworks and the art of caring. Students learn the nursing process, a critical thinking approach to problem-solving and decision-making on behalf of patients, and are introduced to evidence-based practice. Introduces definitions, historical background and status of nursing as a profession and as a discipline of applied science. Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program.
The systematic and continuous collection of biopsychosocial, cultural, and spiritual data through the assessment of clients' strengths and coping resources, actual and potential health problems, and the identification of factors that place clients at risk for alterations in health. Prerequisite: Admission to Nursing Program, NURS 204 Introduction to Nursing Professional Practice, and NURS 311 Pathophysiology.
This course introduces the student to the use of nursing process in the care of adults with life threatening conditions and exacerbation of chronic conditions. The clinical practicum provides an opportunity to integrate learning with clients in the acute care setting. Prerequisites: NURS 201 Nursing Fundamentals, NURS 210 Health Assessment, NURS 311 Pathophysiology, and NURS 312 Pharmacology.
This course presents clinical decision-making and clinical judgment strategies for the care of adults with acute and complex conditions. Building on NURS 301: Nursing Care of Adults with Acute Conditions, the nursing process is used to analyze and intervene in alterations to the health of the individual and family. The clinical practicum provides an opportunity to work with clients in the acute care and complex settings such as the emergency department, intermediate care, and critical care settings. Prerequisite: NURS 301 Nursing Care of Adults with Acute Conditions.
Pathophysiology is a study of the basic principles, processes, and physiological changes of alterations in body systems. This course will provide a review of human physiology and an overview of pathophysiology, emphasizing imbalance of homeostatic mechanisms and etiology of disease. Pathophysiology of the body systems will be examined from cellular, organ, and systemic levels. Discussions and applied materials will be directed primarily toward nursing students but may also be useful to others wishing to explore healthcare-related fields. Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program, BIOL 221 Human Anatomy and Physiology I, BIOL 222 Human Anatomy and Physiology II, CHEM 151 General, Organic and Biochemistry, or instructor permission.
Pharmacology is the study of various drug classifications, their impact on living tissue, and their actions and distributions in the body - pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. This course will provide an overview of the therapeutic use of drugs on humans. Classes of drugs will be reviewed by body system with key drugs within each class emphasized. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of drug action will be explored, as well as specific drug pharmacokinetics and adverse reactions along with appropriate nursing interventions related to medication administration. Prerequisites: Admission to the Nursing Program, BIOL 211 Anatomy and Physiology I, BIOL 222 Anatomy and Physiology II, CHEM 151 General, Organic and Biochemistry, NURS 311 Pathophysiology or by instructor permission.
This course will cover the science and fundamentals of human nutrition. In this course, topics covered will include nutritional requirements related to changing individual and family needs, food choices, health behaviors, prevention of chronic disease and nutrition-related public health in the United States and globally. Prerequisites: NURS 204 Introduction to Nursing Professional Practice and NURS 311 Pathophysiology.
The emphasis for this course is on the elements of evidence-based practice (EBP). Focus is placed on the cyclical process of identifying clinical questions, searching and appraising the evidence for potential solutions/innovations, planning and implementing practice changes, evaluating the outcomes, and identifying additional gaps in the nursing knowledge. Integration of the existing evidence with clinical judgment, patient preferences, inter-professional perspectives, and other resources forms the basis for the clinical decision-making process that is inherent in improving patient, population, and organizational outcomes. Prerequisites: Statistics (MATH 240, PSYC 240, or SOCI 340), NURS 201 Nursing Fundamentals, NURS 210 Health Assessment, and junior standing in the Nursing Program, or instructor permission.
This course provides acquisition and integration of knowledge vital to the holistic nursing care of children and families experiencing acute and chronic threats to health. Prerequisite: NURS 301 Nursing Care of Adults with Acute Conditions and junior standing or instructor permission.
Exploration of psychiatric nursing principles of mental health promotion and illness prevention; of evidence-based treatment modalities; of hospital and community treatment options; and of nursing principles applied to specific psychiatric clinical disorders. Prerequisites: Senior status and NURS 302 Nursing Care of Adults with Complex Conditions.
This course builds on the concepts of previous nursing courses with emphasis on utilizing the Nursing Process in dealing with women's health focusing on the childbearing years, antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and the health of newborns. Students will explore the concepts of health promotion, disease prevention, and alterations in health related to women in these phases and the newborn infant. Emphasis is on the whole person care of the client and the family. Management and planning of the Nursing Process will include concepts from a variety of culturally diverse settings to include nursing in the community. Prerequisite: NURS 302 Nursing Care of Adults with Complex Conditions or by permission of instructor.
This course addresses population focused health promotion, and disease and injury prevention based on determinants of local, national and global health including lifestyle, environmental, cultural, and genetic factors. Addresses evidence-based clinical prevention responses, including information technology, inter-professional collaboration, population-focused advocacy partnerships, and the caring role of the professional registered nurse to improve population health and minimize the consequences of mass emergencies. Prerequisites: NURS 302 Nursing Care of Adults with Complex Conditions, and Senior standing in the Nursing Program, or instructor permission.
The study of the leadership and management roles and functions filled by professional, registered nurses in a broad range of health care organizations and settings. Focus is on learning and applying core concepts of nursing leadership and management, and the requisite skills of effective nurse leaders/managers. The influence on nursing practice of theoretical, legal, ethical, economic, sociological, cultural and regulatory factors in the ever-changing health care system is examined. Students will have the opportunity to explore their personal and professional perceptions of how nursing leaders/managers impact nursing practice and patient care outcomes. Course should be taken the last semester of a students senior year in the program. Co-requisite: NURS 490 Nursing Capstone.
Prerequisites: NURS 302 Nursing Care of Adults with Complex Conditions, NURS 411 Mental Health, NURS 430 Population Nursing and senior standing in Nursing Program.
Exploration of the field of nursing that focuses on care of the older adult with chronic conditions. Includes unique healthcare needs of seniors, nursing approaches to managing these needs, ethical and legal issues that impact senior care, and exploration of the richness and wisdom of life experience shared by these members of society and families. Prerequisites: Senior standing in nursing program or by instructor permission.
A broad review of professional nursing content and practice to prepare students for the National Council License Exam for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) licensure exam and transition to practice as registered nurses. Students will engage in the classroom and online learning environments to systematically review nursing content and complete NCLEX practice tests. Application and integration of knowledge and skills will occur during students’ practicum experiences working in partnership with clinical teaching associates to provide holistic nursing care to acute-care patients. A comprehensive, standardized examination is completed to determine each student’s proficiency and readiness for entry into nursing practice. Course should be taken the last semester of the student's senior year in program. Co-requisite: NURS 442 Nursing Leadership and Management
Prerequisites: NURS 301 Nursing Care of Adults with Acute Conditions, NURS 302 Nursing Care of Adults with Complex Conditions, NURS 411 Mental Health Nursing, and senior standing in the nursing program.