Bachelors (BA) in Psychology

Overview

This major offers a 50-semester-hour course of study, designed to acquaint students with the field of psychology and the implications of its principles for human behavior. The bachelor of arts degree has a greater emphasis on applied learning than does the bachelor of science. Students are required to obtain a minimum grade of C- in all courses taken for the major.

Degree Outcomes

Graduates with a BA in psychology will:

  • Understand the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, empirical findings and historical trends in psychology
  • Apply basic research methods in psychology, including research design, data analysis and interpretation
  • Apply critical and creative thinking, skeptical inquiry, and the scientific approach to solve problems related to behavior and mental processes
  • Apply psychological principles to personal, social and organizational issues
  • Weigh evidence, tolerate ambiguity, act ethically, and reflect other values that are the underpinnings of psychology as a discipline
  • Reflect on their personal faith and explain how it interacts with the discipline of psychology

Major Requirements

Complete the following:

An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Major topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, thinking, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, social interaction, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite to most other psychology courses.
By focusing on the structures and functions of the nervous system, this course provides a biological framework for understanding normal and abnormal complex human behaviors and mental processes such as perception, motor control, learning, memory, and emotions. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology
Applied statistics for the social and behavioral sciences. Emphasis is placed on statistical logic and decision making. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.
This course examines psychology as a career. Career options are examined. Goal setting, professional development, and networking are emphasized. Required for all psychology majors.
A study of the social and psychological processes of human interaction. Major topics to be covered include conformity, aggression, self-justification, persuasion, prejudice, attraction, and interpersonal communication. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
Traditional areas of study in cognitive psychology will be discussed. These areas include perception, attention, memory, reasoning, problem solving, and language. Traditional views as well as current trends will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
An introduction to methods of psychological research. Explores essential topics for experimental research including research design, reliability, validity, and research ethics. Students also learn how to critically assess research literature, assimilate information from a variety of sources, and interpret data. In addition, students learn how to prepare manuscripts in APA format and to prepare professional research presentations. Prerequisites: PSYC 150 General Psychology and PSYC 240 Statistical Procedures.
The history of the various schools of psychology, their origins, distinguishing characteristics, major contributions, theoretical positions, and contemporary issues are investigated. Required for psychology majors. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology and a minimum of two upper-division psychology courses; senior standing is recommended.
This is a capstone course for the major focusing on the integration of Christianity and psychology and the application of psychological principles and findings in every day settings. Required for all psychology majors. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: senior status.

Choose one of the following:

0 Personality Theories 3 hours. A survey of the major theorists of personality and their theories. Included are psychoanalytic, dispositional, phenomenological, and behavioral theories. An integrative approach will involve synthesis of important elements of theory and Scripture. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
This course examines mental illness, mental processing, and behavior from a strengths-based approach which emphasizes the strengths and resources individuals bring to a particular situation. The course is designed to explore the concepts, research, techniques, and exercises to enhance optimism, decrease stressors, and increase well-being. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
This course will cover the nature of culture and its applications to understanding human functioning. Students will examine their own and other cultures, as well as cultural influence on their thought, behavior, and relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.

Choose one of the following:

study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from the prenatal period through late childhood. (Identical to FCSC 311.) Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A study of physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral development from young adulthood to old age. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A study of the unique physical, intellectual, personality, social, and moral developmental changes during the period of adolescence. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.

Choose one of the following:

A study of theory and technique of person-centered counseling. The course is designed to teach basic theoretical postulates and to focus on effective intervention skills for those anticipating future work in Christian ministries, teaching, or mental health settings. Recommended as a prerequisite for field experience work (PSYC 475). (Identical to CHMN 381.) Prerequisites: PSYC 150 General Psychology and sophomore status or above. Recommended: PSYC 330 Personality Theories.
Students will develop skills in understanding and critically evaluating educational and psychological tests (measures of ability, achievement, personality, and vocational interest). Also, modern principles of "psychometrics" - data-based analysis of test items, scores, and interpretations - will be emphasized, particularly the reliability and validity of items and scales. Students will have hands-on experience with various tests and will computer-analyze sample data from test development projects. Prerequisites: PSYC 150 General Psychology and PSYC 240 Statistical Procedures. Recommended: PSYC 391 Research Methods
A study of the nature, causation, and treatment of the major psychiatric and behavioral disorders. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.
Examines the complex interaction of psychological and sociological forces involved in substance abuse and addictions. Etiology, treatment options, and efficacy of treatments are reviewed. Prerequisite: PSYC 381 Counseling. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.

Choose one of the following:

This course provides an overview of the neuropsychological, neuroanatomical, and biochemical basis for mental functions including motor control, object recognition, spatial reasoning, attention, language, memory, and emotion. Methods of neuropsychological research are explored. Recommended: PSYC 220 Biological Psychology.
A survey of learning theories and the basic research questions being asked in this important field. Special emphasis will be placed on translating experimental theory into practical methods. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
Using psychophysical techniques, students will study sensory systems, including vision, audition, olfaction, taste, touch, and kinesthesis. Classic and current theories of perception and sensation will be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.

Choose 3 hours of the following:

Supervised experiences in helping activities in mental health agencies and institutions. A maximum of 3 hours may be applied toward a psychology major. Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: upper-division majors only and by permission. Recommended: PSYC 381 Counseling or other 300-level psychology course.
Individualized study or supervised research in an area of special interest to the student which is outside the regular offerings of the major. Additional course fee (per credit) is required.

Choose 12 hours of the following: