Master of Education (MEd) Course Descriptions

Master of Education

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Course Requirements

Required for all concentrations

Complete the following:

Students will be introduced to the six "lenses" of the EDFL Conceptual Framework and Professional Dispositions. Each student will develop a deeper understanding of personal vocation and mission in light of this overall framework by engaging each of these "lenses" to evaluate their current dispositions and work. The intent is for each student to establish a foundation of self-understanding and to become a self-reflective and analytical practitioner and learner.
This course will focus on designing curriculum units and instructional plans for a standards-based curriculum while utilizing research-based best practices for teaching, learning and assessment. There will be an emphasis on the development and implementation of an integrated interdisciplinary unti for the candidate's specific teaching or educational assignment that utilizes concept-based curriculum strategies and instructional techniques to "teach beyond the facts for the thinking classroom." In addition, students will be participating in a Professional Learning Community that will focus in on a data collection cycle to inform and evaluate practice. Students will develop assessment instruments and procedures that relate to their own disciplines. Current methods of formative assessment - including portfolios, rubrics, and other forms of authentic assessment - will guide and inform discussions.
This course examines how belief structures undergird the methods educators use to motivate people to learn. Through the light of ethical theory, students examine how organizational leaders respond to the situations they face. Students also reflect on and apply their own values and ethical understanding to shed light on case studies that represent situations they often face as educational leaders.

Complete the following:

This course will introduce students conceptually to research as a way of thinking for classroom or school improvement. As consumers of research, students will learn to search databases, analyze data, identify and summarize results to inform educational decisions. Students will be exposed to both qualitative and quantitative research paradigms, and begin to develop a literature review for their research project.
This course is designed to develop conceptual and technical skills needed for designing and implementing action research studies in classrooms, schools, and other educational settings. The focus is on the following: observing and recording behavior in school settings; problem definition and focus; sampling; data storage and retrieval systems; and trustworthiness of action research. Emphasis is placed on defining and investigating problems which require the educator to investigate strategies for improving their practice and student learning. Prerequisite: MEDU 530, Overview of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methodology.
This course is part two of the master's research project in which the student continues to work under the direction of the advising professor. In this final stage the student completes a written paper, publishes the work on an open-source site, and publicly presents results of the research project.

Specialization (15 hours - select one)

Complete the following:

Thoughtful classroom practice depends on sound theory. This course examines some current competing theories, looks at the implications of various literacy theories as they impact classroom decision making, and, through reading and discussion, develop a personal understanding of literacy processes. The linguistic framework of reading and its place in the language arts will also be explored.
Classroom teachers become acquainted with a wide variety of methods for assessing student progress in reading and writing. Administration and scoring of these tests will be explored. Information about how testing results can facilitate teaching and learning is the goal.
This course focuses on current methods and materials for reading/literacy instruction. The strategies used by proficient readers will be explored and teaching methods will be modeled and implemented. Methods of assessment and strategies for remediation will also be explored.
This course focuses on the issues related to public and school-based concerns about literacy learning. The discussion of issues will lead to research-based applications that can be translated into the classroom practice at the elementary, middle, or high school level.
The content of this course includes: the organization of reading programs within the context of state and federal regulation and within the structure of the school-wide program; the types of testing used to diagnose and monitor student progress; the methods that can be used to involve parents, paraprofessionals, and volunteers; and the methods available to assess program effectiveness. Observations in a variety of school settings will be organized.

Choose one of the following:

Students who have successfully completed a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at George Fox University are not required to take READ 536/537 for this endorsement.
This course focuses on the reading and writing needs of the student at the middle level and in the high school. The teaching of critical reading and writing strategies will be included as well as assessment tools. This course is required for those pursuing the middle level and high school authorizations of the reading endorsement, but is appropriate for teachers of all levels.
This course explores theoretical principles and practices based on current research. Emphasis is on strategies for coming to print, print conventions, and reading aloud. Shared, guided, and independent reading and writing is also explored. These strategies are based on theoretical assumptions from the psychology of language and cognition development and linguistics.

Complete the following:

Enrollment in the reading practicum requires successful completion of READ 530, READ 531, READ 532, READ 534 and READ 538.
The reading practicum will provide a context in which to apply methods, assessment techniques, and teaching strategies in a school setting. It will also provide opportunity for an observation of a reading program in application. The practicum setting must include assessment, teaching, and evaluation of students at both authorization levels. Prerequisites: READ 530 History and Foundations of Literacy Learning; READ 531 Analysis of Reading and Writing Assessments; READ 532 Advanced Strategies in Literacy Instruction; READ 538 Organization of Reading Programs; or by permission.

Complete the following:

Students who have successfully completed a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at George Fox University are not required to take ESOL 572 for this endorsement.
Examines the fundamental elements, processes, and patterns of oral and written language for the teacher of English to speakers of other languages. Topics include phonetics, phonology, sociolinguistics, pragmatics, morphology, orthography and writing conventions, syntax, semantics, and discourse analysis. English is the primary focus of the course, with reference to other languages commonly spoken by students in Oregon classrooms.
Examines various factors, concepts, and theories about first and second language acquisition processes and their interrelationships. The course also focuses on the application of this knowledge in ESOL classes for maximizing ESOL students' language development and academic achievement. Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment in EDFL 570.
Examines the diverse and dynamic role of culture in the ESOL students' language development and academic achievement. The course also emphasizes the application of this knowledge for instruction and the involvement of community and its resources for maximizing ESOL students' academic achievement. *Students who have successfully completed a Master of Arts in Teaching degree at George Fox University are not required to take ESOL 572 for this endorsement.
Examines strategies for planning, managing, and teaching English as a second language and discipline-focused content to ESOL students. Emphasis is placed on curriculum, teaching, and learning approaches that accommodate a diverse population within the classroom. This course also focuses on strategies for collaborating with educators and community members in order to provide comprehensive, challenging educational opportunities for ESOL students.
Examines principles, issues, and approaches useful for assessing the English competencies of ESOL students. Emphases are placed on developing appropriate assessment tools for the ESOL classroom and on properly interpreting tests that are used for program placement.

Complete the following:

Enrollment in a practicum requires successful completion of ESOL 570, ESOL 571, ESOL 572 (see note above), ESOL 573 and ESOL 574.

Note: Students can add the bilingual category to the ESOL Endorsement by showing competency in a second language approved by TSPC.

A supervised practicum in an approved school demonstrating knowledge and strategies developed in the ESOL/bilingual courses. Candidates set goals for professional growth in the English-language teaching field. Prerequisites: successful completion of all required ESOL/bilingual courses (or their equivalent).

Complete the following:

Students participate in discussions and/or activities dealing with site-based management, decision making, mentoring, management of human resources, and issues dealing with professional leadership in education.
This course focuses on legal issues that arise in elementary, secondary, and collegiate institutions. The course provides educators with knowledge and analytic skills needed to apply legal frameworks to educational policy including the statutes regulating financial policy. The course investigates creative ways in which law can be used to help address current problems in schools, and helps educators think through questions of ethics and policy that legal disputes raise but do not resolve.
This course is designed to help educational leaders understand key ideas central to ongoing research on teaching and learning to establish educational policy and transform educational practice at their institutions. The course emphasizes ways in which cultural, social, and organizational contexts influence learning. Students will learn to use the clinical supervision model and other tools for supervising and evaluating teacher performance based on best practices. The course will examine the leader's role in establishing and maintaining an environment that is conducive to student and adult learning.
This course is designed for those who want to understand how to manage the school budget successfully in a school. The day-to-day budget issues, including prioritizing, monitoring, and approving expenditures, will be discussed as well as the underlying framework of public budgets, Oregon State Chart of Accounts. This course provides practical knowledge and skills needed to read budget documents with understanding. Practices that encourage ethical care, goal oriented spending, and knowledgeable monitoring are explored and developed.
This course provides an opportunity for candidates for the Preliminary Administrator License to prepare and to present evidence that the practicum experience developed knowledge, skills, and dispositions reflected in the TSPC standards, the School of Education conceptual framework, and the dispositions.
Practicum experiences are carried out at a building level of responsibility by working concurrently in two different authorization level sites. Principal License candidates will begin a practicum in elementary, middle level, and high schools under the direct supervision of a university supervisor and a licensed school administrator. Assignments will require candidates to learn about issues at the site, work with mentors to resolve the issues, and evaluate how they are being handled. These experiences will be supplemented by online administrative academic projects that focus on school governance and partnerships along with school management topics. The university supervisor and candidates will communicate via the Internet providing feedback to colleagues on various projects. Pass/No Pass
Practicum experiences continue at a building level of responsibility. Principal License candidates will complete a practicum in elementary, middle level, and high schools under the direct supervision of a university supervisor and a licensed school administrator. Practicum experiences are supplemented by online administrative academic projects that focus on curriculum and staff development, supervision and evaluation, and personnel hiring. The supervisors and candidates will communicate via the Internet. Pass/No Pass

Master of Education + Special Education Endorsement

Expand All

Course Requirements

Complete the following:

Students will be introduced to the six "lenses" of the EDFL Conceptual Framework and Professional Dispositions. Each student will develop a deeper understanding of personal vocation and mission in light of this overall framework by engaging each of these "lenses" to evaluate their current dispositions and work. The intent is for each student to establish a foundation of self-understanding and to become a self-reflective and analytical practitioner and learner.
This course will focus on designing curriculum units and instructional plans for a standards-based curriculum while utilizing research-based best practices for teaching, learning and assessment. There will be an emphasis on the development and implementation of an integrated interdisciplinary unti for the candidate's specific teaching or educational assignment that utilizes concept-based curriculum strategies and instructional techniques to "teach beyond the facts for the thinking classroom." In addition, students will be participating in a Professional Learning Community that will focus in on a data collection cycle to inform and evaluate practice. Students will develop assessment instruments and procedures that relate to their own disciplines. Current methods of formative assessment - including portfolios, rubrics, and other forms of authentic assessment - will guide and inform discussions.
This course examines how belief structures undergird the methods educators use to motivate people to learn. Through the light of ethical theory, students examine how organizational leaders respond to the situations they face. Students also reflect on and apply their own values and ethical understanding to shed light on case studies that represent situations they often face as educational leaders.

Complete the following:

This course will introduce students conceptually to research as a way of thinking for classroom or school improvement. As consumers of research, students will learn to search databases, analyze data, identify and summarize results to inform educational decisions. Students will be exposed to both qualitative and quantitative research paradigms, and begin to develop a literature review for their research project.
This course is designed to develop conceptual and technical skills needed for designing and implementing action research studies in classrooms, schools, and other educational settings. The focus is on the following: observing and recording behavior in school settings; problem definition and focus; sampling; data storage and retrieval systems; and trustworthiness of action research. Emphasis is placed on defining and investigating problems which require the educator to investigate strategies for improving their practice and student learning. Prerequisite: MEDU 530, Overview of Qualitative and Quantitative Research Methodology.
This course is part two of the master's research project in which the student continues to work under the direction of the advising professor. In this final stage the student completes a written paper, publishes the work on an open-source site, and publicly presents results of the research project.

Complete the following:

This course will focus on the historical foundations and purpose of special education, theory, special education law and policy, including legislation and litigation, and ethics. The course provides the foundational knowledge needed to understand exceptionalities of all kinds.
The theoretical and practical aspects of human development with emphasis on - birth through young adult – and the connection to developmental psychology and learning theory. Functional knowledge of exceptionalities: autism, dyslexia, executive functioning are developed as it relates to learning.
This course prepares candidates to meet the needs of school students with high incidence learning disabilities in general education classrooms. Develops curricular modifications and adaptations to evaluate content curriculum, and to provide assistance to general education teachers. Develops knowledge and skills to adjust curriculum content using Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and informal assessments to provide information on student progress in the general education curriculum.
This course prepares candidates to meet the needs of school students with low incidence disabilities. Candidates explore, discuss and learn how to plan and implement curriculum that includes CCSS as well as informing disability eligibility decisions as well as instruction in academic and functional low incidence disabilities including: intellectual disability, hearing impairment, visual impairment, deaf/blindness, communication disorder, emotional disturbance, orthopedic impairment, traumatic brain injury, autism spectrum disorder, and other health impairments. Functional living skills are incorporated into content planning.
This course addresses assessment and evaluation as the means for informing special education disability decisions as well as instructional decisions. The candidate will learn and practice multiple ways of assessing students. These include informal assessment, progress monitoring, formal evaluations, and standardized achievement tests. Candidate will learn to write formal reports that emphasize proper administration of assessments and ethical complications of the evaluation process to synthesize all that data to create a cohesive picture of the student’s standing, and continue to use the appropriate assessment tools to generate the information needed to make curricular and program decisions.
This course will focus on developing candidates’ ability to evaluate technological and assistive supports and determine appropriateness for exceptional learners. Candidates will design and develop assistive technology tools for use in academic and functional settings.
Candidates will gain knowledge and skills in writing effective, compliant Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and acquire communication and collaboration strategies to facilitate IEP meetings and interactions with families. Candidates will identify key issues that could lead to litigation. Course content includes communication, organization, compliance and administrative management.
This course will focus on preparation of candidates to work with students who demonstrate significant emotional/behavioral, trauma, and fetal alcohol/drug issues and use interventions that are research-based. Candidates are instructed on the methods of behavior analysis and accommodation strategies to include development of behavior support plans.
This course will focus on the families, individuals, and community supports for individuals with disabilities ages birth - 21. Candidates will identify age-appropriate services such as Head Start, early intervention, vocational educational programs, community experiences, employment and other post-school adult living objectives, acquisition of daily living skills, if appropriate, and access to state and federal services. Candidate will also learn all required federal/state requirements for secondary transition plans. They will learn how to apply and develop an individual Education Plan for students of transition age.
This practicum will be completed at either early childhood elementary, or elementary middle, or middle level and high school, in settings with students identified with mild to moderate disabilities. Candidates will complete a work sample during this practicum. Candidates will complete a minimum of 90 hours of clinical practice in a mild to moderate disability placement.
This practicum will be completed at either early childhood elementary, or elementary middle, or middle level and high school, in settings with students identified with moderate to severe disabilities. Candidates will complete a minimum of 90 hours of clinical practice in a moderate to severe disability placement.
Individualized and clinical observation/research in an area of special interest to the student which is outside the regular offerings of the program.