Politics Concentration

More than ever, we need citizens who are committed to public service, conflict resolution, law, development and business – people who are driven, passionate, knowledgeable and ready to enact change in these arenas. We need people who are engaged with current issues because they know how much they matter.

These are the students we seek in the politics concentration of our history major.

Maybe you desire to have a broad overview, or maybe you want to dive deeper with an emphasis on American institutions, law, international relations, comparative government, peace studies, political theory and public policy. Broad or niche, there are options.

Whatever you’re looking for, this is a program that gives you versatility in the job market.

At the center of the program is the conviction that the Christian faith is relevant to all of life – including politics. Our professors draw from the best of George Fox’s evangelical and Quaker heritage, and are actively engaged in research and current events.

Chat with a Current Student

A happy current student

Why Study Politics at George Fox?

From highly qualified professors to a community centered around good conversation and growth, there are a number of reasons George Fox’s politics course of study might be right for you.

students in the classroom

What Will I Study?

  • Political theory classes give you a rich understanding of the “why” and “how” politics are practiced.
  • Classes that cover the fundamentals of American government as well as international relations
  • Each year, seminars dealing with various topics are announced that represent current faculty interests and competencies.
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Daniel Bennett

Associate Professor of Political Science, John Brown University

Studying politics has been the best decision I’ve made at George Fox. The faculty are beyond capable and highly personable, and the classes are both challenging and rewarding.

What’s after George Fox

Employment of political scientists is projected to grow 6 percent from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations. Increased demand for public policy analysis in both government and non-government organizations will support employment growth for these workers (U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics).

  • Policy Analyst and Member Services Director, Oregon House Republican Office
  • Public Policy Assistant, American Farm Bureau Federation
  • Source Analyst, Department of Defense
  • Field Researcher, National Republican Senatorial Committee
  • Funding Operations Specialist, Community Assistance Network
  • Database Technician, Republican National Committee
  • Deputy Director of Early Voting, Victory 2008
  • School Liaison and Counselor, Youth Guidance Association
  • Staff Assistant, Organization for International Investment
  • Assistant Account Executive, The Sherry Group
  • The White House
  • The Center for National Policy
  • Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee
  • Federal Bureau of Investigation
  • United States House and Senate
  • United States Department of State
  • The Heritage Foundation
  • U.S. Embassy, Nicaragua
  • National Right to Life
  • Cambridge University, Master of Philosophy in International Relations program
  • Catholic University of America, PhD program in Political Science
  • Cornell University School of Law
  • George Washington University Law School
  • University of Minnesota School of Law
  • University of Michigan School of Law
Elizabeth Tolon

Tolon Pursues Her Passion for Law

Fresh out of Fordham Law School, George Fox alumna and former ASC student body president Elizabeth Tolon is living the dream as a young lawyer in New York City. Despite her current success, she didn’t always plan on going into law. In fact, she began her years at George Fox studying music education. “I wanted to be a high school choir teacher,” she explains, “but I’d always loved political science.”

At first, Tolon settled for taking a few political science classes on the side, working toward a minor. Before long, supported and encouraged by professor Ron Mock and former professor Michael MacLeod, she added political science as a second major and began to explore new options.