Doctor of Psychology (PsyD Degree)

Purpose

The Doctor of Psychology (PsyD) program follows a professional, competency-based training model and is designed to prepare licensed, health service psychologists. While the PsyD degree provides training in the scientific foundations of psychology and in research methods and statistics, it places emphasis on the development of clinical skills. Since the initial endorsement of the doctor of psychology degree by the American Psychological Association in 1979, the professional model has been incorporated into the training programs of many universities and professional schools. The Graduate School of Clinical Psychology (GSCP) of George Fox University is accredited by the American Psychological Association. (The American Psychological Association's Commission on Accreditation is located at 750 First Street N.E. in Washington, D.C. 20002, (202) 336-5979.)

The central distinctives of the program includes the integration of a Christian worldview and the science of psychology at philosophical, practical, and personal levels as well as psychological aspects of religious or spiritual issues within the other religious communities.  A second distinctive is an emphasis on clinical training to serve a diverse population in primary care medical settings.

 

Program Objectives

Educational Objectives

To enable students to:

  • Competently provide psychological services in a wide variety of clinical settings
  • Evaluate, implement and apply psychological research
Professional Objectives

To enable students to:

  • Become licensed as psychologists
  • Commit themselves to the highest standards of professional ethics.

Admission Requirements

Applicants seeking admission to the PsyD program must hold a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, with a minimum GPA of 3.0, and approximately 18 semester hours of psychology or other related social science credits. In addition, applicants must complete the following to be considered for admission to the program:

  • Doctor of Psychology application form and application fee
  • Scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Aptitude Scales
  • One official transcript from all colleges or universities attended
  • Four references (forms provided in the application materials)
  • An in-person interview

Transfer Credit

Transfer of up to 35 hours of credit is allowed toward the Doctor of Psychology program from accredited graduate schools (transfer credit is not allowed toward practicum or internship requirements). Students must have earned a grade of B or better for a course to be considered for transfer. In addition, only courses taken elsewhere within seven years of the date of matriculation to the Doctor of Psychology program will be considered for transfer. Consult the program website for specific details concerning the transfer of credit. Transferability of credits earned at this institution and transferred to another is at the discretion of the receiving institution. Consult the registrar's office for information on eligibility of transfer credit.

Residence Requirements

Of the 125 hours required for the Doctor of Psychology program, a minimum of 90 hours must be taken in resident study at George Fox University. All work leading to the degree must be completed within seven years from the time of matriculation. Extension of this limit requires approval of the Graduate School of Clinical Psychology (GSCP) faculty. Reinstatement to the program after withdrawal requires Admission Committee action and may subject the student to additional requirements for the program.

Course Requirements

The Doctor of Psychology program is generally five years in length with 125 semester hours of coursework required as a minimum for graduation. This involves 100 hours of psychology coursework, 15 hours of faith integration coursework, and 10 hours of dissertation. In addition, 24 clinical internship hours are required for the degree.

The first two years of the program emphasize study in the scientific foundations of psychology and an introduction to clinical theory and practice. As the student advances in the program, the emphasis shifts toward application of basic knowledge through integration of these areas in clinical practice. Professional training in assessment and psychotherapy begins in the first year with coursework and simulated psychotherapy, clinical training continues incrementally throughout the program, culminating in the clinical internship during the fifth year.

An optional training track in primary care psychology as well as emphasis areas of study in psychological assessment or child and adolescent psychology offer the opportunity for students to benefit from a generalist training program while directing some of their academic coursework, clinical training, and research into areas of specialty defined by APA.

Clinical Training
Clinical training is a central component of the PsyD curriculum. Although it is a distinct part of the curriculum, it is also integrated with the academic coursework throughout the program. The clinical training process begins in the first year and continues throughout the program, ultimately preparing the student for postdoctoral residency training and licensure as a psychologist.

 

Other Degree Requirements

GSCP Faculty perform an annual evaluation of each student's academic progress, interpersonal relationships, legal and ethical conduct, and clinical skills. Practicum supervisors also provide regular evaluations of students' knowledge, skill, and professional attitudes displayed in clinical settings. Students failing to act in an ethical or professional manner, receiving an unsatisfactory evaluation by practicum or internship supervisors, failing to comply with George Fox University standards of conduct, or showing other evidence of deficiency in professional development may be dismissed from the program.

A Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology degree is normally conferred following successful completion of the first two years of the program and associated requirements. The MA degree is not designed or intended as a terminal degree; consequently, only students intending to complete doctoral study are admitted into the program. The MA degree is conferred following completion of 60 hours of coursework, including 40 hours of psychology coursework, 7 hours of which are Faith Integration coursework, 1 hour of Research Vertical Team/Dissertation and 12 hours of clinical training.

Continuous Enrollment
Students are expected to maintain continuous enrollment throughout the program. While full-time enrollment normally consists of a minimum of 8 hours each semester, failure to enroll for a minimum of 2 hours each semester (summer term is excepted) will result in suspension from the program. Re-enrollment will require application for readmission.

Professional Standards
Standards for graduate education in psychology, as well as for the practice of psychology, are set by the policies of the American Psychological Association (APA) through its Commission on Accreditation and those of the relevant state laws and administrative rules. In Oregon, these include the Oregon Revised Statutes and Oregon Administrative Rules of the Oregon State Board of Psychologist Examiners. The design, structure, and processes of graduate education at George Fox University are influenced by these statutes and policies. Consequently, in addition to the policies of the university's graduate program, students in the psychology program are expected to know and abide by the professional standards established by these regulatory agencies. Both faculty and students are expected to adhere to the APA Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (2002).

Additional Information
Additional program information can be obtained on the program website. Among this material is an FAQ page within which can be found information concerning time to completion, program costs, success in internship placement, attrition rates and licensure following graduation.

Graduation Requirements

In order to complete the Doctor of Psychology program students must:

  • Satisfactorily complete a minimum of 125 semester hours of coursework with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or above
  • Retake a designated course if a grade below a B- is received (for more specific information, please refer to the GSCP Handbook)
  • Successfully pass the Comprehensive Clinical Exam. The Comprehensive Clinical Exam has two components, a Scientific Foundations Exam (SFE) and Clinical Intervention and Assessment Exam (CIAE). The first component is a Scientific Foundations Exam that ensures a student has acquired a minimal level of achievement related to the scientific and theoretical aspects of academic psychology. Students are required to pass this exam before they can advance to doctoral candidacy, including the scheduling or defense of their preliminary dissertation proposal. The second component is the Clinical Intervention and Assessment Exam, which demonstrates a minimum level of achievement in conceptualization from a specific theoretical orientation, the selection of evidence-based interventions, the use of standardized assessment data to inform their understanding of the client and clinical practice, and the ability to assess and respond to outcome data. The CIAE must be passed before the student begins the internship application process (see GSCP handbook for additional details).
  • Complete the equivalent of a one-year full-time clinical internship (normally 50 weeks and 2,000 clock hours; 24 semester hours)
  • Successfully defend the doctoral dissertation (minimum of 10 hours) and submit related documentation components (See the GSCP Student/Clinical Training Handbook)
Expand All

Curriculum Plan

Completed by all students

Complete the following:

Focuses on the major theories of personality, their authors, and the systems of psychotherapy associated with those personality theories. This course provides an understanding of the basic principles of personality development, structure, dynamics, and process. The course also serves as a survey of the major systems of psychotherapy. Significant research on personality and psychotherapy outcome and process will be reviewed.
Focuses on understanding the basic processes and distinguishing features among the major categories of mental disorders and becoming familiar with standard diagnostic categories and systems. Assessment and case reports using DSM IV criteria are emphasized.
Examines contemporary perspectives on thought, learning, memory, emotion, and other higher mental processes. After a review of theoretical perspectives on learning, cognition, and emotion, cognition-emotion interaction and the development of this interaction will be discussed.
An overview of some of the major theories, concepts, and research topics in social psychology. The social aspects of the individual's behavior are studied, with special reference to the social agencies involved in shaping behavior.
An overview of the important psychological developments that occur throughout the life span. Contemporary research and developmental theories will provide a structure for understanding the change of people from infancy to senescence. Central issues of human functioning such as intelligence, social relations, motor functions, gender, faith, morality, and selfhood will be discussed in order to provide a normative and foundational basis for understanding people.
An overview of the development of psychology via prominent historical figures and systems from the early Greek philosophers to the 21st century. Current developments from these roots will be critically evaluated.
An overview of human neuroscience is provided, with emphasis on those areas of importance to the clinical psychologist.
A survey of theory and methods of test construction, with emphasis on professional standards for evaluating published tests and application of test results. Concepts of test development will be examined, including scaling, item analysis, standardization, measurement error, reliability, and validity. Basic statistics and statistical software related to correlational analyses will also be included. Commonly used psychology tests will be used as psychometric examples (especially cognitive scales). Issues of test use among ethnic and special populations will also receive attention.
This course emphasizes a review of basic statistics (univariate statistics such as Pearson r, t-tests, and ANOVA), then generalizes these to the case of multiple dependent variables. Numerous methods of comparing and combining results will be discussed including test assumptions, methods for tests of significance, and effect sizes.
A rigorous examination of the spectrum of methods available for research in the clinical domain, ranging from basic to applied, and including descriptive, traditional experimental research, and strategies used in evaluating the effectiveness of intervention programs in a variety of mental health settings. Topics include the principles of experimental and quasiexperimental design and an introduction to qualitative research. Data analyses include MANOVA, MANCOVA, Discriminate Analysis, Meta-analysis, Factor Analysis, and an examination of the assumptions of each.
Examines the American Psychological Association's "Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct," federal and state laws relevant to the practice of psychology, the related ethical and practical considerations involved in qualifying for licensure, and establishing and conducting a professional practice.
In addition to assisting toward internship application, this course focuses on contemporary issues within the field of psychology; guidelines and procedures for referral and interprofessional collaboration are reviewed; and legal, ethical, and professional issues involved in working in a multidisciplinary managed care context are discussed. Establishing a professional practice and the professional and personal life of the therapist also receive attention. Students will be expected to bring examples of curriculum vitae, marketing strategies, as well as management problems and issues from their current practice settings. Prerequisite: fourth-year standing.
Introduces the basic statistical concepts of measurement and objective and projective personality assessment. Administration, scoring, and interpretation of objective personality measures will be emphasized as well as preparing written reports of test results. Additional course fee required.
An introduction to individualized assessment of intellectual and other selected cognitive functions, such as memory and academic achievement. Theoretical, conceptual, and clinical aspects of test administration and interpretation will be emphasized. A weekly one-hour lab practicum experience is included in order to provide practice with and coaching on the most common cognitive test instruments. Prerequisite: PSYD 511 Psychometrics. Additional course fee required.
Introduction to the literature and issues involved in clinical work with people of various cultural, racial, and ethnic backgrounds. The role of culture and ethnicity in conceptualizations of mental health and pathology, help seeking, and response to treatment will be emphasized.
This class explores the theory and practice of psychodynamic psychotherapy, including analytic, object relations, and self psychologies. Major theorists and assessment techniques are critically appraised, and process and outcome research related to these approaches is examined. Case studies will be required of current clients, whom the student treats in his or her practice setting, examining them from a psychodynamic perspective. Prerequisite: PSYD 501 Theories of Personality and Psychotherapy.
This class provides an introduction to cognitive-behavioral techniques, explores their application in short-term and longer-term psychotherapy, and examines process and outcome research findings related to the use of these approaches. Case studies are used to develop skills in planning cognitive behavioral interventions, establishing behavioral objectives, and measuring outcomes of treatment. Consistencies and tensions with Christian beliefs and worldviews will be explored, and practical strategies for using cognitive-behavioral interventions with religious clients are examined.
This is a survey course of the major theoretical developments in family and couples therapy. Leading theories, concepts, assessment strategies, and intervention techniques will be discussed and demonstrated. A systems perspective on health and dysfunction will be contrasted with individual approaches to psychotherapy. The process and outcome research literature will be reviewed. An emphasis is placed on understanding the diversity of family structures and styles in contemporary society, as well as the ways many Christians understand marriage and family relationships. Several issues relevant to clinical work with Christian families and couples will be discussed.
This course provides an introduction to the theory, research and practice of clinical supervision and to the management of clinical service provision. The student will become acquainted with theory and research on management and supervision and engage in experiential learning of supervision and management skills. This course is structured as a two-semester course that involves both theory and supervised practice in Supervision and Management.
This course provides an introduction to the theory, research and practice of clinical supervision and to the management of clinical service provision. The student will become acquainted with theory and research on management and supervision and engage in experiential learning of supervision and management skills. This course is structured as a two-semester course that involves both theory and supervised practice in Supervision and Management.

Required for Master's Degree:  PSYD 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 507, 511, 513, 517, 521,  522, 551, 552

An introductory exploration of faith integration in psychology and psychotherapy, emphasizing the historical conversations between Christian theology, psychology, and spiritual formation as well as contemporary conversations about religion, spirituality, science, culture, and psychotherapy. Implications for health service psychology are emphasized.
An introduction to the development and teachings of the major religions of the world. Special attention to elements shaping multicultural understandings of God, humanity, the world, and the purpose/goal of life will be explored with special attention given to how professional psychologists can be sensitive and effective in dealing with clients who hold various religious views, concerns, and practices.
In this integration capstone course, major themes of Christian theology are considered with regard to their implications for the life and work of a professional psychologist.
An introduction to the ways God works in human lives, affecting redemptive change and spiritual transformation, with special attention given to the personal life of professional psychologists. A theoretical basis for reflection, combined with experiential components of the classical spiritual disciplines, will enable the student to establish a personal foundation of spiritual formation, including such elements as prayer, journaling, and various approaches to worship. Additional course fee required.
A guided spiritual formation practicum involving spiritual reading, monthly meetings with a spiritual director, monthly meetings with a triad of peers, and reflection on how one's spiritual self is connected to one's professional self. Additional course fee required.
Continuation of PsyD 617. Prerequisite: PsyD 617. Additional course fee required.
Continuation of PsyD 618. Prerequistie: PsyD 618. Additional course fee required.
Continuation of PsyD 619. Prerequisite: PsyD 619. Additional course fee required.
Explores a particular topic of interest to health service psychologists while considering perspectives of both psychology and Christianity.
Explores a particular topic of interest to health service psychologists while considering perspectives of both psychology and Christianity.
Required for Master's Degree: PSYD 571, 616, 617, 618, 630

Complete the following:

This two-semester sequence prepares the student for the Practicum I training experience. It is a two semester sequence that includes weekly lecture and coursework; in additon, participation in weekly lab groups is required. The experiential component begins with simulated clinical during the first month and culminates in two long-term clients during the second semester. The clinical sessions integrate course theory and practice and are taped and closely supervised. The clinical sessions provide a laboratory experience in which students learn interpersonal communication and empathy skills using role-play techniques and audio and video feedback. In addition to weekly lectures, students are expected to participate in weekly, vertical, clinical team meeting with students from all cohorts, weekly, small group lab meetings with students from their own cohort, and didactics to introduce them to the legal and ethical issues of practice, the administrative structure and functioning of clinical settings, and the practical issues of assessment, psychotherapy, case management, and record keeping.
This two-semester sequence prepares the student for the Practicum I training experience. It is a two semester sequence that includes weekly lecture and coursework; in additon, participation in weekly lab groups is required. The experiential component begins with simulated clinical during the first month and culminates in two long-term clients during the second semester. The clinical sessions integrate course theory and practice and are taped and closely supervised. The clinical sessions provide a laboratory experience in which students learn interpersonal communication and empathy skills using role-play techniques and audio and video feedback. In addition to weekly lectures, students are expected to participate in weekly, vertical, clinical team meeting with students from all cohorts, weekly, small group lab meetings with students from their own cohort, and didactics to introduce them to the legal and ethical issues of practice, the administrative structure and functioning of clinical settings, and the practical issues of assessment, psychotherapy, case management, and record keeping. Pre-requisite: PSYD 350 Clinical Foundations I
This is a sequence of at least two semesters that builds on PSYD 530-531 Clinical Foundations of Treatment and emphasizes practical training in assessment, diagnosis, psychotherapy, and case management through supervised practice in a variety of clinical settings. Students also participate in team meetings, didactics, and oversight training groups. Prerequisites: PSYD 517 Ethics for Psychologists and PSYD 530-531 Clinical Foundations of Treatment.
This is a sequence of at least two semesters that builds on PSYD 530-531 Clinical Foundations of Treatment and emphasizes practical training in assessment, diagnosis, psychotherapy, and case management through supervised practice in a variety of clinical settings. Students also participate in team meetings, didactics, and oversight training groups. Prerequisites: PSYD 517 Ethics for Psychologists and PSYD 530-531 Clinical Foundations of Treatment.
This is an advanced practicum sequence that builds on Practicum I. Students are placed in various community settings to perform psychological assessments and interventions under the supervision of licensed psychologists. Students also receive weekly clinical oversight on campus by faculty members. Prerequisite: PSYD 532-533 Practicum I.
This is an advanced practicum sequence that builds on Practicum I. Students are placed in various community settings to perform psychological assessments and interventions under the supervision of licensed psychologists. Students also receive weekly clinical oversight on campus by faculty members. Prerequisite: PSYD 532-533 Practicum I.
This sequence emphasizes development of more advanced skills in assessment, diagnosis, psychotherapy, and case management through supervised practice in a variety of field settings. This sequence seeks to develop skills in supervising others and to prepare students for internship. Students continue to participate in team meetings, oversight training groups, and didactics in a seminar format. Prerequisite: PSYD 535-536 Practicum II.
This sequence emphasizes development of more advanced skills in assessment, diagnosis, psychotherapy, and case management through supervised practice in a variety of field settings. This sequence seeks to develop skills in supervising others and to prepare students for internship. Students continue to participate in team meetings, oversight training groups, and didactics in a seminar format. Prerequisite: PSYD 535-536 Practicum II.

Required for Master's Degree: PSYD 530, 531, 532, 533

Complete the following:

A full-time internship comprising 50 weeks and 2,000 hours is required. The internship may be scheduled as a half-time placement for two calendar years or a full-time placement for a single year. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain an APA-accredited or APPIC-recognized internship site. It is likely that students will have to move out of state to complete the approved internship. Prerequisites: completion of MA degree and practicum requirements and approval by the director of clinical training. Special fee assessed.
A full-time internship comprising 50 weeks and 2,000 hours is required. The internship may be scheduled as a half-time placement for two calendar years or a full-time placement for a single year. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain an APA-accredited or APPIC-recognized internship site. It is likely that students will have to move out of state to complete the approved internship. Prerequisites: completion of MA degree and practicum requirements and approval by the director of clinical training. Special fee assessed.
A full-time internship comprising 50 weeks and 2,000 hours is required. The internship may be scheduled as a half-time placement for two calendar years or a full-time placement for a single year. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain an APA-accredited or APPIC-recognized internship site. It is likely that students will have to move out of state to complete the approved internship. Prerequisites: completion of MA degree and practicum requirements and approval by the director of clinical training. Special fee assessed.
A full-time internship comprising 50 weeks and 2,000 hours is required. The internship may be scheduled as a half-time placement for two calendar years or a full-time placement for a single year. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain an APA-accredited or APPIC-recognized internship site. It is likely that students will have to move out of state to complete the approved internship. Prerequisites: completion of MA degree and practicum requirements and approval by the director of clinical training. Special fee assessed.
A full-time internship comprising 50 weeks and 2,000 hours is required. The internship may be scheduled as a half-time placement for two calendar years or a full-time placement for a single year. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain an APA-accredited or APPIC-recognized internship site. It is likely that students will have to move out of state to complete the approved internship. Prerequisites: completion of MA degree and practicum requirements and approval by the director of clinical training. Special fee assessed.
A full-time internship comprising 50 weeks and 2,000 hours is required. The internship may be scheduled as a half-time placement for two calendar years or a full-time placement for a single year. Students are strongly encouraged to obtain an APA-accredited or APPIC-recognized internship site. It is likely that students will have to move out of state to complete the approved internship. Prerequisites: completion of MA degree and practicum requirements and approval by the director of clinical training. Special fee assessed.

Complete 10 hours of the following:

Students must complete a total of 10 dissertation credits. Courses are repeatable and may be combined.

The Research Team is the formal mechanism by which students' involvement in original empirical research is formulated and guided. The Research Team is part of a formal academic sequence involving statistical analysis, research design and research application. Participation in the Research Team will help students' to build the necessary skills to generate and evaluate original research. As part of the research sequence, students must individually complete and defend a doctoral-level dissertation. The dissertation may be of an empirical, applied, or theoretical nature. Students should be able to complete their dissertations within the context of the vertically integrated research teams.
The Research Team is the formal mechanism by which students' involvement in original empirical research is formulated and guided. The Research Team is part of a formal academic sequence involving statistical analysis, research design and research application. Participation in the Research Team will help students' to build the necessary skills to generate and evaluate original research. As part of the research sequence, students must individually complete and defend a doctoral-level dissertation. The dissertation may be of an empirical, applied, or theoretical nature. Students should be able to complete their dissertations within the context of the vertically integrated research teams.
The Research Team is the formal mechanism by which students' involvement in original empirical research is formulated and guided. The Research Team is part of a formal academic sequence involving statistical analysis, research design and research application. Participation in the Research Team will help students' to build the necessary skills to generate and evaluate original research. As part of the research sequence, students must individually complete and defend a doctoral-level dissertation. The dissertation may be of an empirical, applied, or theoretical nature. Students should be able to complete their dissertations within the context of the vertically integrated research teams.

Required for Master's Degree: PSYD 801

Continuing Dissertation

PSYD 655 is required for students who do not finish their dissertation research within the minimum 10 hours. PSYD 655 is repeatable until the dissertation is finished.
To maintain continuous enrollment until dissertation is complete. Does not count toward the degree.

Training Tracks

Students choose one

Additional Core Psychology requirements (2 hours)

Reviews a range of consultation methods in professional psychology, from expert-prescriptive models to collaborative models. Principles of education and program evaluation are also explored. Specific skills such as articulating effective consultation questions, developing questionnaires, conducting qualitative data analyses, and writing in professional psychology are considered.
Reviews a range of consultation methods in professional psychology, from expert-prescriptive models to collaborative models. Principles of education and program evaluation are also explored. Specific skills such as articulating effective consultation questions, developing questionnaires, conducting qualitative data analyses, and writing in professional psychology are considered.

Advanced Psychological Assessment (3 hours)

Students may choose PSYD 524 Comprehensive Psychological Assessment (3 hours) or the two-semester sequence of PSYD 527-528 Neuropsychological Assessment (3 hours total).   Students may use elective credits if they are interested in enrolling in all 3 courses.

Reviews major instruments already learned in Personality, Projectives, Cognitive, and Achievement assessment. Discusses further instrument selection as well as interpretation and synthesis of test findings in writing psychological reports. Specific applications of comprehensive psychological assessments in settings such as schools and forensics are also discussed. Prerequisites: PSYD 521 Personality Assessment and PSYD 522 Cognitive Assessment.
An introduction to the anatomical, empirical and clinical aspects of neuropsychology, with an emphasis upon assessment administration and scoring competencies. Fixed, flexible and process battery approaches will be demonstrated in a weekly practice lab component of the course. Prerequisites: PSYD 521 Personality Assessment, and PSYD 522 Cognitive Assessment. Additional course fee required.
A focus on the appropriate techniques for interpretation, report writing and feedback of neuropsychological assessments. Pre-requisite: PsyD 525-01.

Clinical Psychology Electives (15 hours)

Complete 15 hours from the following:
This course will build on PSYD 505 Human Development. The course provides advanced training in evidence-based interventions for children and adolescents. Interventions taught will center on common referrals including behavior disorders, attention deficit disorders, autism spectrum disorders, depressive and anxiety disorders, adjustment disorders, and pediatric concerns such as toileting and sleep problems. Prerequisites: PSYD 505 Human Development, and PSYD 502 Psychopathology, PSYD 526 Child/Adolescent Assessment (or instructor approval).
Introduces the basic concepts of projective assessment and the administration, interpretation, and report writing for a variety of projective techniques, such as the House-Tree-Person, Thematic Apperception Test, and Rotter Incomplete Sentences. The Rorschach Inkblot Test and the Comprehensive System of John E. Exner (revised) will be emphasized. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: PSYD 521 Personality Assessment.
This course will build on PSYD 505 Human Development, PSYD 521 Personality Assessment, and PSYD 522 Cognitive Assessment. The class provides advanced training in the administration, interpretation and integration of personality, cognitive and behavioral assessment measures for children and adolescents. Assessment techniques include both broad-band measures applicable across diagnostic presentation, as well as disorder-specific assessments designed for: autism spectrum disorders, behavior disorders, attention deficit disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, and stress-related disorders. The course focuses on integrating multiple assessment measures to provide clinically relevant treatment recommendations. Prerequisites: PSYD 505 Human Development, PSYD 521 Personality Assessment, and PSYD 522 Cognitive Assessment (or instructor approval).
An advanced course in contemporary psychoanalytic theories and techniques. Though this is not a practicum course, ideally the student should be involved in working in a counseling setting in which applications of this psychodynamic approach may be tested in practice. Prerequisites: PSYD 501 Theories of Personality and Psychotherapy and PSYD 551 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.
Theory and application of small-group process in clinical settings; laboratory practice in selection of participants, leadership, and interaction methods; and design and implementation of short-term focal groups.
A survey of the literature on substance abuse and chemical dependency. Emphasis is placed on psychological assessment and intervention for persons with substance abuse disorders.
The focus of this course is on the practical understanding and application of Health psychology. This course will introduce you to the biopsychosocial model of health to understand the factors that influence the maintenance of health as well as disease progression. The course includes research-based interventions to treat illness, slow or prevent disease progression.
Explores a particular topic of interest to health service psychologists while considering perspectives of both psychology and Christianity.

Advanced Psychological Assessment (3 hours)

Complete the following:

An introduction to the anatomical, empirical and clinical aspects of neuropsychology, with an emphasis upon assessment administration and scoring competencies. Fixed, flexible and process battery approaches will be demonstrated in a weekly practice lab component of the course. Prerequisites: PSYD 521 Personality Assessment, and PSYD 522 Cognitive Assessment. Additional course fee required.
A focus on the appropriate techniques for interpretation, report writing and feedback of neuropsychological assessments. Pre-requisite: PsyD 525-01.

Primary Care Psychology Track Required Coursework (15 hours)

Complete the following:

An introduction to the foundations and principles of clinical psychopharmacology for psychologists in clinical settings (prerequisite: PsyD 509, Biological Basis of Behavior.)
This course will build on PSYD 505 Human Development. The course provides advanced training in evidence-based interventions for children and adolescents. Interventions taught will center on common referrals including behavior disorders, attention deficit disorders, autism spectrum disorders, depressive and anxiety disorders, adjustment disorders, and pediatric concerns such as toileting and sleep problems. Prerequisites: PSYD 505 Human Development, and PSYD 502 Psychopathology, PSYD 526 Child/Adolescent Assessment (or instructor approval).
A survey of the literature on substance abuse and chemical dependency. Emphasis is placed on psychological assessment and intervention for persons with substance abuse disorders.
The focus of this course is on the practical understanding and application of Health psychology. This course will introduce you to the biopsychosocial model of health to understand the factors that influence the maintenance of health as well as disease progression. The course includes research-based interventions to treat illness, slow or prevent disease progression.
Required for PCP Track. This is the first course in the two-semester sequence which prepares the student for the two-year clinical training experience in primary care medical setting. The Foundations course includes an understanding of the primary care behavioral health model, including interprofessional biopsychosocial treatment mode. The course will include training and practice in evidenced based interventions for primary care, use of assessment, program evaluation and use of population metrics to enhance care. In addition to lecture, training will include practice, participation in training webinars and how to use external resources essential to remaining current in the field. Prerequisite: instructor approval required if not enrolled in PCP Track.
This is the second course in the two-semester sequence for the PCP Track. this course will deepen student's understanding of the interprofessional model used in the primary medical setting to include more advanced skills in complex and collaborative care, use of clinical registries, clinical pathways and other processes designed to enhance population reach. The course will also demonstrate how to expand interprofessional primary care psychology into the specialty medical areas of pediatrics, women's health, cardiology and other medical specialties. Prerequisite: PSYD 701 Foundations of Primary Care Psychology.

Clinical Psychology Electives (2 hours)

Complete 2 hours from the following:
This course will build on PSYD 505 Human Development. The course provides advanced training in evidence-based interventions for children and adolescents. Interventions taught will center on common referrals including behavior disorders, attention deficit disorders, autism spectrum disorders, depressive and anxiety disorders, adjustment disorders, and pediatric concerns such as toileting and sleep problems. Prerequisites: PSYD 505 Human Development, and PSYD 502 Psychopathology, PSYD 526 Child/Adolescent Assessment (or instructor approval).
Introduces the basic concepts of projective assessment and the administration, interpretation, and report writing for a variety of projective techniques, such as the House-Tree-Person, Thematic Apperception Test, and Rotter Incomplete Sentences. The Rorschach Inkblot Test and the Comprehensive System of John E. Exner (revised) will be emphasized. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: PSYD 521 Personality Assessment.
This course will build on PSYD 505 Human Development, PSYD 521 Personality Assessment, and PSYD 522 Cognitive Assessment. The class provides advanced training in the administration, interpretation and integration of personality, cognitive and behavioral assessment measures for children and adolescents. Assessment techniques include both broad-band measures applicable across diagnostic presentation, as well as disorder-specific assessments designed for: autism spectrum disorders, behavior disorders, attention deficit disorders, mood and anxiety disorders, and stress-related disorders. The course focuses on integrating multiple assessment measures to provide clinically relevant treatment recommendations. Prerequisites: PSYD 505 Human Development, PSYD 521 Personality Assessment, and PSYD 522 Cognitive Assessment (or instructor approval).
An advanced course in contemporary psychoanalytic theories and techniques. Though this is not a practicum course, ideally the student should be involved in working in a counseling setting in which applications of this psychodynamic approach may be tested in practice. Prerequisites: PSYD 501 Theories of Personality and Psychotherapy and PSYD 551 Psychodynamic Psychotherapy.
Theory and application of small-group process in clinical settings; laboratory practice in selection of participants, leadership, and interaction methods; and design and implementation of short-term focal groups.
A survey of the literature on substance abuse and chemical dependency. Emphasis is placed on psychological assessment and intervention for persons with substance abuse disorders.
The focus of this course is on the practical understanding and application of Health psychology. This course will introduce you to the biopsychosocial model of health to understand the factors that influence the maintenance of health as well as disease progression. The course includes research-based interventions to treat illness, slow or prevent disease progression.
Explores a particular topic of interest to health service psychologists while considering perspectives of both psychology and Christianity.