Animation Concentration

George Fox cinema and media communication majors with Animation Concentration study at one of the top Christian colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Animation is everywhere. Industries that utilize animation range from film and TV to marketing, advertising, gaming, motion graphics, scientific visualization, and so much more. Students in George Fox's animation concentration within the cinematic arts major use industry-standard software to bring their animated stories to life.

Get Practical, Hands-on Experience

In addition to our theory and production core, our students take several animation classes ranging from pre-production to post-production. These courses include storyboarding and concept design, 2D computer animation, 3D computer animation 1 and 2, motion graphics and visual effects, and more. Students will also get a chance to create their own short animated films in our advanced production workshops.

We take a hands-on approach, allowing you to create animation right away, and you have 24/7 access to our state-of-the-art labs.

Access to Industry-Standard Software

Using industry-standard software such as Autodesk Maya, Toon Boom, the Adobe Creative Suite and Dragonframe, we teach you the tools to bring your stories to life in a variety of animated mediums, from 3D and 2D computer animation to traditional hand-drawn and stop-motion techniques. 

Among the resources we offer is the new Wacom Cintiq Pro, a pen-on-screen device that gives professional-quality precision for digital creation, from drawing to 3D sculpting. We also feature a brand new traditional animation studio fit with animation light tables, down shooters and professional stop-motion armatures.

Lucy and the Fly, Best of Festival Award (stop motion animation) at the BEA Festival of Media Arts. Director: Emily Hamilton, class of 2017.


Work with Experienced Faculty 

Our experienced faculty are award-winning independent filmmakers who have worked in the industry for companies including Laika Studios, House Special, Bent Image Lab, Fisher-Price, the Buffalo Bills and American Greetings.

Our faculty has helped students win national awards, including a BEA Best of Festival honor in 2017. Graduates of our program have gone on to work at Laika Studios, NBC Sports, Refuge VFX, Guidespark and SOMA Games and have interned at companies that include Supergenius Studio and Dreamworks.

Positive Job Outlook

The employment trend for animation and multimedia artists in Oregon, Washington and California is expected to grow over 25 percent over the next 10 years. That is over 15 percent more nationwide for selected occupations and 10 percent more than the total labor market. California is the top state by far with 7,425 job postings – more than double the next state (New York). The state of Washington is ranked fifth.  

George Fox is uniquely positioned, in that there are only a handful of other Council for Christian Colleges & Universities schools that offer an animation degree/concentration. George Fox is the only CCCU school with this type of degree in the states of Oregon and Washington.

The most common career paths for the animation concentration include ...

  • Animation director or supervisor
  • Animator (2D/3D computer animation and stop motion animation)
  • CG Artist/Generalist
  • 3D modeler
  • Compositor
  • Roto artist
  • Matte painter
  • Layout artist
  • Production assistant
  • Render wrangler
  • Storyboard artist
  • Concept artist/illustrator
  • Visual development artist

Request more information about the animation concentration at George Fox University or schedule a visit to begin your education at Oregon's Christian university, ranked as one of the top Christian colleges in the nation by Forbes.

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Major Requirements

Core requirements (21 hours)

Choose one of the following:

An historical examination of the moving image, including television programming and film in the United States. Employs contextual and ethical methods for illuminating the relationship of these media artifacts to modern culture, both secular and religious.
Film is a truly an international medium, stretching across borders, decades, and cultures. Students will study international films in terms of the historical, cultural, political, and economic forces that shaped them.

Complete the following:

An introduction to film as a narrative and visual medium, emphasizing the terms, methods and techniques of film analysis, as well as prominent critical theoretical approaches to understanding film.
Survey of the historical development of newspapers, magazines, broadcast media, and cinema. Analysis of the role(s) of mass media in shaping and altering opinion and values in contemporary culture.

Complete the following:

An introduction to the language and the technical, creative, and aesthetic elements of the video production process. Course includes basic lighting, sound, camera operation, composition, and design of visual elements, producing, and directing through both classroom and supervised laboratory experiences.
Concentrating on recording, editing, and mixing multitrack audio on a digital platform. The course will look at special recording techniques for (a) human voices in speaking, singing, and dramatic performance; (b) musical instruments; (c) dramatic sound effects. Students will complete projects in editing and mixing of multitrack sound programs.
This class helps prepare students for entry into the professional realm by developing networking and marketing strategies, and by preparing a professional reel of their best work, which will be critiqued by members of the local media industry. Prerequisite: senior status. Additional course fee required.

Choose one of the following:

An introduction to the styles, techniques, content, and forms of television writing. Both dramatic (sitcom and dramatic features) and nondramatic (news and informational) forms of writing are covered. The writing of several short scripts is required in the course. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the college writing competency, enrollment in the William Penn Honors Program, or instructor permission.
An introduction to the art of writing for film. Dramatic structure is emphasized and plot scenarios, dialogue, and characterization are among several topics examined and exercised. Students create scripts for original features, short films, or plays. The writing experience is complemented through an examination of the business aspects of writing, including spec-scripts, agents, and the Hollywood system.

Complete one of the following options:

Students can complete 2 credits of CINE 475 Field Experience or 1 credit of CINE 475 and 1 credit of CINE 474 Corporate Video Production.

Working with a client is an essential skill for the video professional. This course will prepare students to work collaboratively and creatively alongside a client while gaining hands-on experience.
An internship experience designed to give students an opportunity to practice video and film techniques and principles in an off-campus, professional setting. Students choose from a variety of options - cable, broadcast, corporate, medical, or commercial production facilities - based on the student's goals and interests. Up to 6 hours may apply to the cinematic arts major. Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Concentrations (24-27 hours) - choose one

Students in the animation concentration study techniques for producing 2D, 3D and stop motion animation and visual effects using a combination of creativity, aesthetics, and computer software.

Complete the following:

This course is an introduction to industry-standard graphic design applications such as Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop and InDesign. Additional course fee required.
Art majors given preference. This course is a study of materials, methods, and techniques used for drawing with pencil, ink, charcoal, and other drawing media. Additional course fee is required.
This is the study of pre-production and previsualization techniques used in animation. Topics include developing story, storyboarding, concept design, and editing animatics. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: ARTS 111, ARTD 210 or instructor’s permission.
This is an introduction to the fundamentals of animation production, from traditional hand drawn techniques to stop motion animation. In this hands-on workshop, students will produce short animation projects. Additional course fee required.
This is an introduction to 2D computer animation using industry standard software and techniques. Students will create character animations and short animation projects. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: ARTD 210 Creative Suite I, CINE 212 Introduction to Animation or instructor’s permission.
This is an introduction to 3D computer animation using industry standard software and techniques. Emphasis is placed on modeling texturing, lighting and rendering. Students will create original 3D artwork. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTD 210 Creative Suite I
Students explore different means of producing visual effects using digital computer imaging, blue-screens, compositing, and old-fashioned movie magic. Students will also learn how to create animated text sequences and video graphics. Additional course fee required.
This is an advanced course in 3D computer animation using industry standard software and techniques. Emphasis is placed on rigging and character animation. Students will create short animation projects. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CINE 212 Introduction to Animation and CINE 312 3D Computer Animation I
In this intensive hands-on production course, students will draw on all their filmmaking skills to produce 10- to 30-minute shorts - narrative, documentary, or animated - for their portfolios and film festivals. This semester focuses on preproduction and production, including script breakdown, casting, and actual filming. Prerequisites: one of the following: CINE 310 Intermediate Directing, CINE 320 Dramatic Scriptwriting, CINE 333 Camera & Lighting, CINE 343 Sound Design, CINE 350 Editing Video, CINE 430 Producing & Directing Video, or instructor's permission. Admission to the class is a competitive process based on the student proposal and script. Additional course fee required.

Suggested Electives (not required)

Introduction to the materials, methods, and techniques used in photography. Additional course fee is required.
Practice and Theory pertaining to drawing the human figure from live models. Translating the 3 dimensional figure to 2 dimensions will be the first priority, along with exploration and study in historical and contemporary figural interpretations. Both traditional and non-traditional mediums will be explored with the intent of gaining competence and confidence in the use of figural subject content in a variety of mediums. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 111 Drawing I, or instructor’s permission.
Upper division students will be given more latitude in the creative application of the concepts stated in Figure Drawing I. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: ARTS 311 Figure Drawing I or instructor’s permission.
This course explores the various camera and lighting techniques used in film and digital video production. Students will focus on applying lighting techniques and camera movement to create specific visual effects. Students will apply the ideas discussed in the text and lectures to a series of in-class explorations, in addition to scenes filmed outside of class. Prerequisite: CINE 230 Introduction to Video Production or instructor's permission. Additional course fee required.
An internship experience designed to give students an opportunity to practice video and film techniques and principles in an off-campus, professional setting. Students choose from a variety of options - cable, broadcast, corporate, medical, or commercial production facilities - based on the student's goals and interests. Up to 6 hours may apply to the cinematic arts major. Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
This course continues the project started in Advanced Production Workshop I into postproduction, including editing, sound design, color correction, and DVD authoring. Prerequisite: CINE 481 or instructor's permission.
Students in the audio production concentration focus on audio techniques for music recording and mixing; sound design for film, video and new media and production for radio.

Complete the following:

This class explores the use of digital sound technology to record, edit, and mix audio for film and television. Students will use their audio skills to record sound both in the field and in the recording studio. Prerequisite: CINE 243 Introduction to Audio or instructor's permission.
Students will learn to record music and vocal tracks in a digital multitrack studio environment. Students will produce music, advertising, and other audio projects in this hands-on studio course. Prerequisite: CINE 243 Introduction to Audio or instructor's permission.
Theory and practice in editing the moving image. Analysis of Hollywood and avant-garde styles of editing is followed by practice exercises illustrating each concept. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CINE 230 Introduction to Video Production or instructor's permission.
In this intensive hands-on production course, students will draw on all their filmmaking skills to produce 10- to 30-minute shorts - narrative, documentary, or animated - for their portfolios and film festivals. This semester focuses on preproduction and production, including script breakdown, casting, and actual filming. Prerequisites: one of the following: CINE 310 Intermediate Directing, CINE 320 Dramatic Scriptwriting, CINE 333 Camera & Lighting, CINE 343 Sound Design, CINE 350 Editing Video, CINE 430 Producing & Directing Video, or instructor's permission. Admission to the class is a competitive process based on the student proposal and script. Additional course fee required.

Choose 12 hours of the following:

2-3 credits of CINE 475 can be applied to this requirement.

Working with professionals in the contemporary Christian music field, students will learn basic techniques of songwriting including lyrics and song structure. Students will write their own songs, which they will then produce and record. Prerequisite: CINE 243 Introduction to Audio or instructor's permission.
An internship experience designed to give students an opportunity to practice video and film techniques and principles in an off-campus, professional setting. Students choose from a variety of options - cable, broadcast, corporate, medical, or commercial production facilities - based on the student's goals and interests. Up to 6 hours may apply to the cinematic arts major. Pass/No Pass. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.
This course continues the project started in Advanced Production Workshop I into postproduction, including editing, sound design, color correction, and DVD authoring. Prerequisite: CINE 481 or instructor's permission.
A study of various aspects and types of jazz, from blues to jazz rock. Students will discover the great jazz artists and learn how to listen to a variety of jazz idioms.
Introductory work with technological resources basic to work in the music field. Includes hands-on experience with MIDI and sequencing, music notation programs and desktop publishing, digital sound formats, and basic Web authoring.
An introductory study of the principles of stage lighting and sound design for theatrical production. The emphasis will be on both design and operation of sound and lighting equipment. Students will apply theory through a number of projects. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: THEA 130 Stagecraft or instructor' permission.
OR

Up to 15 semester hours of coursework at the Contemporary Music Center Program in Nashville.

The study of the moving image incorporates cinema history, media criticism and elements of hands-on film production.

Complete the following:

This course explores the various camera and lighting techniques used in film and digital video production. Students will focus on applying lighting techniques and camera movement to create specific visual effects. Students will apply the ideas discussed in the text and lectures to a series of in-class explorations, in addition to scenes filmed outside of class. Prerequisite: CINE 230 Introduction to Video Production or instructor's permission. Additional course fee required.
Theory and practice in editing the moving image. Analysis of Hollywood and avant-garde styles of editing is followed by practice exercises illustrating each concept. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CINE 230 Introduction to Video Production or instructor's permission.
In this intensive hands-on production course, students will draw on all their filmmaking skills to produce 10- to 30-minute shorts - narrative, documentary, or animated - for their portfolios and film festivals. This semester focuses on preproduction and production, including script breakdown, casting, and actual filming. Prerequisites: one of the following: CINE 310 Intermediate Directing, CINE 320 Dramatic Scriptwriting, CINE 333 Camera & Lighting, CINE 343 Sound Design, CINE 350 Editing Video, CINE 430 Producing & Directing Video, or instructor's permission. Admission to the class is a competitive process based on the student proposal and script. Additional course fee required.

Choose 15 hours of the following:

Students must choose 15 hours of electives from CINE offerings, which may also include THEA 370 Directing for Theatre

Cinematic Arts (CINE) Course Descriptions

An introduction to the director's role in theatre through historical and artistic research, comprehensive structural analysis, scene work, the creation of composition, stage pictures, blocking, rhythm, tempo, and an exploration of the working relationships with actors and design teams. This course requires additional outside-of-class time for rehearsal and performance of selected material. Prerequisite: THEA 100 Acting I - Fundamentals.
OR

Up to 15 semester hours of course work at the Los Angeles Film Studies Center

The study of the moving image incorporates cinema history, media criticism and elements of hands-on film production.

Choose one of the following:

Both courses must be taken, regardless of which fulfills the Theory Core requirement.
An historical examination of the moving image, including television programming and film in the United States. Employs contextual and ethical methods for illuminating the relationship of these media artifacts to modern culture, both secular and religious.
Film is a truly an international medium, stretching across borders, decades, and cultures. Students will study international films in terms of the historical, cultural, political, and economic forces that shaped them.

Complete the following:

This course explores the various camera and lighting techniques used in film and digital video production. Students will focus on applying lighting techniques and camera movement to create specific visual effects. Students will apply the ideas discussed in the text and lectures to a series of in-class explorations, in addition to scenes filmed outside of class. Prerequisite: CINE 230 Introduction to Video Production or instructor's permission. Additional course fee required.
Theory and practice in editing the moving image. Analysis of Hollywood and avant-garde styles of editing is followed by practice exercises illustrating each concept. Additional course fee required. Prerequisite: CINE 230 Introduction to Video Production or instructor's permission.

Choose 15 hours of the following:

Students must choose 15 hours of electives from CINE and COMM offerings.

Cinematic Arts (CINE) Course Descriptions

Communication Arts (COMM) Course Descriptions

OR

Up to 15 semester hours of course work at the Los Angeles Film Studies Center

Jobs and Internships

Cinema and Media Communication majors at George Fox study at one of the West Coast's top Christian colleges

Graduates face diverse career pathways. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of film and video editors is projected to grow 17 percent from 2016 to 2026.

  • Video Producer, Luis Palau Association
  • Producer, Blazers Broadcasting
  • Morning Edition Producer, KTUU-TV Channel2
  • Production Assistant, Grimm, NBC 
  • Audiovisual Technician, Nike
  • Production Assistant, Oregon Public Broadcasting
  • Post Production Supervisor, CBS
  • Video Editor/Videographer, Joni and Friends
  • Senior Business Affairs Manager, Talent Direct
  • Film & Special Projects Manager, Visit Anchorage
  • Production Artist, GoPro
  • Lead Video Editor, Encoder, Echelon Studios
  • Portlandia – IFC, Portland, Oregon
  • R2C Group, Portland, Oregon
  • Supergenius Studio, Oregon City, Oregon
  • @Large Films, Portland, Oregon
  • Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, Los Angeles, California
  • Riveting Entertainment, Los Angeles, California
  • Funnelbox, Oregon City, Oregon
  • Black Lake Bible Camp, Olympia, Washington
  • Sovrn, Boise, Idaho
  • Transitions Global, Castle Rock, Colorado
  • Act One, Hollywood, California

Student Experiences

Gaby Sipe

"My time as a cinematic arts major at George Fox was a truly enriching experience. My professors were extremely knowledgeable, encouraging, and made me feel prepared to work in the industry. The program is full of passion that intertwines with a desire to bring honor to God through our creation of art. We were encouraged to use the creativity that we were blessed with and share it with those around us."

- Gaby Sipe
Class of 2019

Emily Hamilton

"There are a range of incredible opportunities to take advantage of as a cinematic arts major, whether it be traveling to freezing Park City for Sundance, or taking part in the Fox Film Festival and seeing your work on the big screen. My favorite memories come from working with incredible friends on projects we truly believed in. I graduated from George Fox with a wider view of the world, prepared to pursue a career that I love."

- Emily Hamilton

Points of Distinction

  • Outstanding faculty with a Christian worldview
  • One-on-one mentoring
  • Small class sizes
  • Application learning environment beginning freshman year
  • Access to professional industry-standard equipment
  • Immersion in a highly team-oriented learning environment

Why George Fox?

Christ-centered community

Our faith influences everything we do here, from the way our professors teach to the way we relate to one another and serve in the community.

Global opportunities

More than half of George Fox undergraduate students study abroad, ranking George Fox among the nation's leaders in study abroad participation (U.S. News & World Report).

Small classes

Our 14-to-1 student-to-faculty ratio means you'll get to know your professors on a personal level.

National recognition

George Fox University is a Christian university classified by U.S. News & World Report as a first-tier national university, and Forbes ranks George Fox among the highest Christian colleges in the country.