General Education

Overview

General education, or what at George Fox we refer to as the liberal arts core, is that part of the undergraduate college curriculum required of all graduates which gives them a common experience and helps implement the distinctive university mission. Rather than being just a collection of “extra” courses, the liberal arts core is a coherent, sequential program designed by faculty to help students cultivate knowledge, develop skills, and foster dispositions that will help them become integrative, Christ-centered lifelong learners.

At George Fox, five themes are woven throughout the coursework in the liberal arts core: Communication, Collaboration, Critique, Care and Christ. These themes are introduced, reinforced and practiced through the following coursework.

Expand All

General Education Requirements

Liberal Arts and the Christian Life

Complete the following:

The first course in the liberal arts core, Knowing and Being Known, introduces students to the history and mission of George Fox University and the values and habits of mind central to a liberal arts education. The course presses each student to engage in metacognitive analysis of his or her own learning style and goals. Additional course fee required.
This course, taken by all George Fox students in their final year of study, provides an opportunity for students to reflect on the liberal arts learning of their undergraduate experience and to prepare for the transition to the next stage of their lives. The course allows students to wrestle with challenging texts and focus on discerning vocation while planning for their own continuing spiritual formation and engagement with the wider community after college. Prerequisite: Senior standing or permission of LIBA 400 director.
This two course sequence (THEO 101 and 102, offered fall and spring each school year) introduces students to Christian life, thought, practice, and spirituality through the Apostles’ Creed. Over the course of a year, students will engage with foundational questions such as: What is belief and knowledge? Who is God? Who is Jesus Christ? Why the cross and resurrection? Why the church? Who is the Spirit? Where did life come from and what is its end? Through different learning styles and forms of engagement, various communities, and diverse global perspectives, students are invited to encounter the breadth and depth of an ancient faith that continues to transform lives today across the world.
This two course sequence (THEO 101 and 102, offered fall and spring each school year) introduces students to Christian life, thought, practice, and spirituality through the Apostles’ Creed. Over the course of a year, students will engage with foundational questions such as: What is belief and knowledge? Who is God? Who is Jesus Christ? Why the cross and resurrection? Why the church? Who is the Spirit? Where did life come from and what is its end? Through different learning styles and forms of engagement, various communities, and diverse global perspectives, students are invited to encounter the breadth and depth of an ancient faith that continues to transform lives today across the world. Prerequisite: THEO 101 I Believe
Note: Students can opt to complete BIBL 100 Bible Survey (3) and RELI 300 History and Theology of Christianity (3) in place of THEO 101 (3) and THEO 102 (3), if their course schedule can not accommodate THEO.  Students may substitute BIBL 101 Literature of the Old Testament (3) and BIBL 102 Literature of the New Testament (3) and RELI 300 History and Theology of Christianity (3). If substituted, all courses must be taken.

Choose one of the following:

In this course students will be introduced to basic tools and scholarly attitudes for studying the Bible, using a particular biblical book or set of related books as a focus. Material will be studied not only for academic knowledge but also spiritual and personal growth. Prerequisite: BIBL 100 Bible Survey, BIBL 101 Literature of Old Testament, or BIBL 102 Literature of New Testament
Biblical Studies is a vibrant and dynamic academic field, with profound implications not only for communities of faith but also for the study of politics, literary studies, philosophy, history, and popular culture. This course will focus on contemporary issues relevant to the research interests and specialties of George Fox University Biblical Studies faculty and will offer an opportunity for students and faculty to collaborate in the dual process of research and personal transformation. Prerequisite: BIBL 100 Bible Survey or BIBL 101 Literature of Old Testament
In this course, students will be introduced to basic tools and scholarly attitudes for thinking about religious and theological topics. The course will draw on a variety of materials (such as texts, practices, and/or archaeology) to examine historical or contemporary issues. Material will be studied not only for academic knowledge but also spiritual and personal growth. Prerequisite: BIBL 100 Bible Survey, BIBL 101 Literature of Old Testament, or BIBL 102 Literature of New Testament
This course explores the rich heritage of the Quaker movement in its historical, social, and religious settings. The distinguishing beliefs of Friends and contemporary trends also will be studied, with particular interest in how to apply timeless truths in timely ways.

Essential Skills

Students must fulfill the college writing competency milestone by submitting a proficient writing portfolio and passing a timed writing assessment. The following are ways students can successfully fulfill the writing competency requirements:
  • Students enrolled in LIBA 100 have a chance to fulfill both of these requirements through enrollment in Writing Lab instruction during their first semester.
  • Students unable to complete the writing portfolio requirement during their enrollment in LIBA 100 must take and pass WRIT 111 (3) to satisfy their portfolio requirement. They must also separately pass the timed writing assessment (administered by the Writing Lab) to complete the writing competency milestone.
  • Students unable to pass the timed writing assessment during their enrollment in LIBA 100 will be required to strengthen their writing through a writing improvement plan designed by the Writing Lab until they can pass the timed writing assessment.
  • For transfer students who have LIBA 100 waived, a college-level writing course (equivalent to WRIT 110 College Writing) completed at a previous institution will satisfy the writing portfolio requirement. If they have not taken a writing course, they must enroll in and pass WRIT 111 to satisfy the writing portfolio requirement. Transfer students must also pass the timed writing assessment through the Writing Lab in order to satisfy the college writing competency milestone.
  • Students transferring to George Fox with an approved transfer degree have their college writing competency satisfied through their transfer degree. For a list of approved transfer degrees please visit our Transfer Credit page.
An introduction to the study of human communication. Application of communication principles to interpersonal, group, and public contexts. Particular emphasis on the practice of public speaking. Students will prepare and deliver several oral presentations.
Students in this course will learn to think critically about their personal health and wellness in the context of Christian commitment. They will learn scientific principles of aerobic conditioning and weight training. Popular lifetime fitness activities will be introduced. Special emphasis will be placed on developing and maintaining lifestyle habits that optimize well-being. (May not be repeated for credit.)

The math requirement is waived for students entering with a SAT math score of 600 or above (if test was taken prior to March 2016) or a SAT math score of 620 or above (test taken March 2016 or later) or an ACT score of 28 or above.


Other students meet the requirement by successfully completing one of the following classes:

A liberal arts math course emphasizing applications of mathematical concepts in areas such as financial topics, probability and statistics, and uses spreadsheets as a mathematical tool.
An algebra course designed for students who have a good background in high school algebra and are prepared to cover the major topics of algebra in more depth and breadth. Applications of algebra will be emphasized in this course. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for the calculus sequence. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent.
A course for students who are preparing to take calculus or other courses requiring a similar background. In addition to studying the topics found in a college algebra course, this course will focus on trigonometry and an introduction to exponential and logarithmic functions. Prerequisite: high school algebra or its equivalent. Students who have taken MATH 180 College Algebra may not take this course for credit.
The class is a study of limits limits of functions, applications of derivatives, and an introduction to integration. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics or equivalent.
This course is the second of two courses designed to engage elementary and middle school prospective teachers in the learning and development of the mathematical knowledge needed for teaching mathematics. Emphasis will be placed on nuanced mathematics content knowledge needed for teaching within the domains of algebra,statistics, probability, geometry, and measurement. Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 211 Foundations of Elementary Mathematics I.
A foundational course for the study of computer science and information systems. The course covers an overview of programming methodology and gives the student an ability to write computer programs using standard style and structure. Programming projects are completed in one or more high-level languages. Prerequisite: high school algebra or equivalent. Additional course fee required.

Broad, Integrative Learning

In addition to these areas and skills which form a foundation for vocation and lifelong learning, a broadly-educated person will have experience in a breadth of domains of knowledge and inquiry. At George Fox, we offer students a choice of how to gain that critical breadth. The first option offers faculty as guides in the process of learning through integrative courses. The second option gives students more choice and flexibility but requires slightly more coursework and leaves the integrative component of the learning up to the students themselves.

Complete the following:

This course introduces students to literature and philosophy as methods of human inquiry. Special focus is given to close reading of texts with an attention to literary form and on thinking and living ethically. Topics and texts vary by section.

OR

Alternate Option: If students choose the alternate option they must complete one literature course and one philosophy course from the following course options.
Choose one of the following:
Introduces and examines as literary texts significant works of world mythologies. Readings stress those cross-cultural themes and literary forms exemplifying the ideals, values, and concerns that have shaped our shared human condition. The course surveys myths from African, Middle Eastern, Asian, Native American, Meso-American, Oceanic, and European literatures. Universal motifs and unique differences in these traditional sacred and secular stories are examined with an eye to understanding how myths underpin cultural, community, and individual values, ethical teachings, and spiritual experiences that continue to inform the world's cultures.
Considers works written in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Oceania, Europe, and the Americas during the medieval and early modern periods. Students examine culturally defining texts that reflect both the uniqueness of culture and the universality of literary themes. Students read a sample of texts written between the medieval period and 1900. The focus is on texts that continue to be important to the culture they represent, such as The Tale of Genji, Journey to the West, The Thousand and One Nights, The Divine Comedy, and Shakuntala.
Examines contemporary literatures across the world in order to explore both the similarities and differences in literary styles and themes. Because so much current non-Western literature is influenced by Western literature, culture, and values, students will consider historical background, including colonial, post-colonial, or political readings of writers such as Chinua Achebe, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez, Nadine Gordimer, Lu Xün, and Jamaica Kincaid.
Choose one of the following:
This course is designed to introduce students to what it means to think and live philosophically. There are a number of different variations of this course. Each variation picks a different topic through which to explore how philosophy be a tool for interpreting, understanding and interacting with the world. Not only that, we will also examine how philosophy can shape the way in which we live out our lives. Each course includes some reading of Plato and at least one other major philosophy in the tradition. Examples of different variations of this course include: "God, Freedom and Evil", "Simplicity", "Socrates and Plato", "Land and Humans", and "Virtue and Faith".
Ethics consists of an analysis of the ethical theories and systems by which persons make judgments and choices, with special attention to contemporary moral issues and the modern revival of virtue theory.
An introduction to philosophical issues in the arts, such as art and morality, the nature of creativity, aesthetics, and the relation of the arts to worldviews.

Complete the following:

This interdisciplinary, general education course centers its intellectual and artistic queries around the enduring question: “How do the arts reveal truth and celebrate beauty in their cultural context?” The course will introduce students to the manner in which the disciplines of art, music and theatre encounter the world with specific attention to their relationship to truth and beauty in both the Renaissance and Postmodern worlds.

OR

Alternate Option: If students choose the alternate option they must complete two courses from two different disciplines from the following course options.
Art
Art majors given preference. This course is a study of materials, methods, and techniques used for drawing with pencil, ink, charcoal, and other drawing media. Additional course fee is required.
A survey of the elements and concepts of art theory and practice as reflected in culturally and historically significant painting, sculpture, architecture, and other art forms, from prehistoric times to 1450. Additional course fee is required.
A survey of the elements and concepts of art theory and practice as reflected in culturally and historically significant painting, sculpture, architecture, and other art forms, from 1450 to the present. Additional course fee is required.
Theatre
Study of basic principles of acting, including survey of acting theories, performance of scenes, and critical observation and analysis of productions. This course requires additional outside-of-class time for rehearsal and performance of selected material.
Balancing lecture with hands-on experience, the course offers a survey of materials, processes, and equipment in the fabrication, assembly, painting, rigging, and installation of stage scenery, properties, and lighting. Additional course fee is required.
Music
This course provides a fundamental understanding of music by considering the basics of musical construction, with examples drawn from the history of music. A study of musical notation, interval recognition, elements of pitch and rhythm, scale and chord construction, essential concepts in harmony, and basic musical forms. The student will be able to experience these fundamental concepts at the piano. No musical or keyboard experience is necessary. This is a general education course for non-music majors.
A study of various aspects and types of jazz, from blues to jazz rock. Students will discover the great jazz artists and learn how to listen to a variety of jazz idioms.
This course acquaints the liberal arts student with a broad range of musical styles reflecting diverse cultures, including classical, jazz, and popular music. Various composers, performers, and their music are listened to and studied. This is a general education course for non-music majors.
Choose one course from the list of approved courses in History, Political Science, and International Studies AND one course from the list of approved courses in Economics, Psychology, and Sociology.

Choose one of the following:

A survey of Western civilization from the ancient world through the Reformation and religious wars, including attention to the origins and development of religious, political, and economic life and ideas.
A survey of European civilization from early modern Europe to the present day. Special attention is given to the political, economic, and religious developments that continue to influence European society and its role in world events.
The first half of a two-semester survey of American history. The course surveys historical development from human origins in North America through the founding of the United States to the end of the Civil War.
The second half of a two-semester survey of American history. The course surveys historical development in the United States beginning with Reconstruction of the nation during and after the Civil War and continuing through contemporary times.
An introduction to the core issues and problems that affect the entire world, including threats to security such as war and terrorism, the rise of globalization, the persistence of inequality between rich and poor countries, and the degradation of the environment. (Identical to INTL 230.)
An introduction to the core issues and problems that affect the entire world, including threats to security such as war and terrorism, the rise of globalization, the persistence of inequality between rich and poor countries, and the degradation of the environment. (Identical to INTL 230.)
An introduction to the study of the use of political processes to decide public policy and the distribution of resources within and among communities and nations. Systems of government, and individual behaviors and informal political processes within those systems, will be examined using examples from various parts of the world throughout history. In the process, students will begin to explore the major questions of political philosophy, civic leadership, and Christian public ethics.
In this course students use concepts and tools from at least two disciplines within history and the social sciences to examine a variety of public issues. Students will be introduced to the commonalities and contrasts in how each discipline conceptualizes, studies, and proposes solutions for complex issues created when humans act and interact. In the process, students will develop a basic multidisciplinary orientation to the study and treatment of human problems.

Choose one of the following:

An introduction to the macro aspects of the social science concerned with the allocation of resources. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles of the economy as a whole, dealing with economic data, behavior, and theory at the aggregate level of the economy. The course studies topics such as government spending, taxation, and monetary policies, as well as events and issues in the global economy. ECON 211 and ECON 212 are complementary courses; however, it is preferred that ECON 211 be taken first.
An introduction to the micro aspects of the social science concerned with the allocation of resources. Consideration is given to the fundamental principles governing production, distribution, consumption, and exchange of wealth. The course studies the behavior of microeconomic units such as individuals, households, firms, and industries. ECON 211 and ECON 212 are complementary courses; however, it is preferred that ECON 211 be taken first. Prerequisites: Students must have completed MATH 180 College Algebra or higher math course, or an SAT math score of 620 or higher or an ACT score of 28 or higher.
An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior. Major topics include the biological bases of behavior, sensation, perception, thinking, learning, memory, development, emotion, motivation, personality, social interaction, and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite to most other psychology courses.
An introduction to the study of society, including the study of the shared relationships that create social organization and social processes of society. Required for sociology majors and for admission into the social work major.
In this course students use concepts and tools from at least two disciplines within history and the social sciences to examine a variety of public issues. Students will be introduced to the commonalities and contrasts in how each discipline conceptualizes, studies, and proposes solutions for complex issues created when humans act and interact. In the process, students will develop a basic multidisciplinary orientation to the study and treatment of human problems.

 

Note: An SSCI 205 Social Scientific Perspectives course may be counted for either the HIST/PSCI/INTL (HPI) requirement or the ECON/PSYC/SOCI (EPS) requirement, with the disciplines being integrated in the course determining which requirement may be met by the course.

a. If an SSCI 205 course integrates two disciplines from HIST, PSCI, and INTL, then the course will only satisfy the HPI requirement.
b. If the course integrates two disciplines from ECON, PSYC, and SOCI, then the EPS requirement will be met.
c. If an SSCI 205 course integrates disciplines across the two lists (e.g. HIST and ECON), the class may be applied to either (but only one) requirement.
d. A student may take two SSCI 205 courses to complete the History and Social Sciences requirement as long as one course contains an HPI discipline and the other contains an EPS discipline.

Choose one of the following:

A course to fulfill the general education requirement. Deals with the organization of living things, anatomy and physiology of cells and organisms, reproduction and heredity, and the role of energy in the ecosystem. Bioethical considerations are discussed. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
This course addresses the scientific concepts, practices, and motivations underlying natural resource availability and human resource use and management. Content will be delivered through lectures, activities, discussions and research projects and will emphasize an ecological understanding of resource cycling and human-environmental interactions, highlighting the mechanisms underlying current environmental problems and the role of Christian communities in addressing these problems. Three lectures and one laboratory per week.
An introduction to life science for those majoring in biology and bioscience-related fields. Topics include cellular biology, genetics, systematics, development, ecology, and anatomy and physiology of plants and animals. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
This course will cover introductory concepts of chemistry. Special attention is given to topics of current interest, such as environmental chemistry, alternative energy, or biochemistry. This course meets general education requirements and is designed for non-science majors. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required.
This course covers introductory and intermediate principles of chemistry. Special emphasis is placed on those aspects of general and organic chemistry that are pertinent to biochemistry. This course provides a background for students with interests in prenursing, nutrition, and related allied health areas. (This course does not meet the requirements for science majors.) Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 440 (test taken prior to March 2016), or a math SAT score of at least 480 (test taken March 2016 or later) or successful completion of MATH 180 College Algebra (or equivalent).
This course covers fundamental chemical principles, reactions, and mode theories. Special emphasis is given to the role of chemistry in everyday life. Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: A math SAT score of at least 500 (test taken prior to March 2016) or a math SAT score of at least 530 (test taken March 2016 or later), or successful completion of MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics (or equivalent).
A relevant and practical introduction to everyday physical phenomena through a conceptual survey of various physics topics, including motion, energy, sound, light, electricity, and relativity. No mathematical background is required. This course meets the general education requirement and is designed for non science majors. Two lectures and one laboratory period per week. Additional course fee is required.
An introduction to astronomy covering the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. The historical context of astronomy will be addressed along with its complex and dynamic relation to faith. The laboratory experience will allow a firsthand experience with some of the pivotal observations and experiments of astronomy. Two lectures and one two-hour laboratory per week. Additional course fee is required.
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using algebraic methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: MATH 190 Precalculus Mathematics.
Mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, wave motion and optics, and modern physics, using calculus methods for analysis. Three lectures and one lab per week. Additional course fee is required. Prerequisite: MATH 201 Calculus I.
Students are required to complete and document a significant interaction with a culture different from their own by the time of their graduation. Most students will complete this requirement by participating in a university-sponsored experience such as Juniors Abroad, May Serve or Study Abroad or by taking a course from the approved list below.

Choose one of the following:

This course offers cross-cultural study designed to prepare and enhance the intercultural and international awareness of our campus community and to gain appreciation for various cultural perspectives different from the students' own. Each individual course includes in-depth study from a variety of perspectives, such as the fine arts, religion, language, natural or behavioral science or history. The course includes class meetings and is a requirement to participate in GEED 455, the actual travel to locations throughout the U.S.. Students must meet the Juniors Abroad eligibility requirements. Additional course fee is required.
This course offers cross-cultural study designed to prepare and enhance the intercultural and international awareness of our campus community and to gain appreciation for various cultural perspectives different from the students' own. Each individual course includes in-depth study from a variety of perspectives, such as the fine arts, religion, language, natural or behavioral science or history. The course includes class meetings and is a requirement to participate in GEED 465, the actual travel to locations throughout the world. Students must meet the Juniors Abroad eligibility requirements. Additional course fee is required.
An in-depth study of a specific era or group found within Western art, such as studies in the Baroque and Rococo, Renaissance, or Women in Art. Specific topics will be dependent on the instructor's area of specialization. Additional course fee is required.
This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
A course designed to introduce students to the nature and function of gender differences in communication on a cross-cultural basis. Examines biological, cultural, linguistic, and power theories that attempt to explain these differences. Focus given to verbal (spoken and written) language as well as nonverbal communication codes. Counts toward globalization requirement.
This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
An integrated introductory study of the French language designed to develop basic speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Students will also be introduced to the cultures of the francophone world. Our three 65-minute class sessions per week include lab time.
An integrated introductory study of the French language designed to develop basic speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Students will also be introduced to the cultures of the francophone world. Our three 65-minute class sessions per week include lab time. Prerequisite: FREN 101 Introductory French I or placement by exam.
A systematic approach to the study of French with extensive practice in speaking and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 102 Introductory French II or placement by exam.
A systematic approach to the study of French with extensive practice in speaking and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 201 Intermediate French I or placement by exam.
A thorough review of French to develop an intermediate proficiency in the language. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing short essays, and developing conversational skills. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 202 Intermediate French II or placement by exam.
A thorough review of French to develop an intermediate proficiency in the language. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing short essays, and developing conversational skills. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: FREN 301 Intermediate/Advanced French I or placement by exam.
Latin American countries from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the conditions that have led to the crises of recent years.
Explores the political, economic, social, and religious developments in the Middle East from the ancient to the modern era, with emphasis on the latter period.
A study of the history of southern Africa from about 1500 to the present with particular attention to the native groups of the region, Dutch colonization and British imperialism, and relations between diverse ethnic groups in the last two centuries.
A study of 20th- and 21st-century Russia and other former Soviet republics, with emphasis on their current significance in the world and the factors in their history that brought the Revolution of 1917 and the collapse of the Soviet Union.
A study of Africans in an America dominated by those of European descent.
This covers communication as it affects and is affected by language and culture. Topics include contextualized use of communication within speech communities, intercultural effectiveness, cultural communication theory, competent intercultural experiences in co-cultures (ethnic, gender, intergenerational, deaf, etc.) and global cultural groups. A student may not earn credit for both the lower-division and upper-division versions of this course.
A comparative study between Christianity and other prominent religions of the world, such as Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, and contemporary kinds of alternative religion. (Identical to INTL 440.)
Introduces and examines as literary texts significant works of world mythologies. Readings stress those cross-cultural themes and literary forms exemplifying the ideals, values, and concerns that have shaped our shared human condition. The course surveys myths from African, Middle Eastern, Asian, Native American, Meso-American, Oceanic, and European literatures. Universal motifs and unique differences in these traditional sacred and secular stories are examined with an eye to understanding how myths underpin cultural, community, and individual values, ethical teachings, and spiritual experiences that continue to inform the world's cultures.
Considers works written in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, Oceania, Europe, and the Americas during the medieval and early modern periods. Students examine culturally defining texts that reflect both the uniqueness of culture and the universality of literary themes. Students read a sample of texts written between the medieval period and 1900. The focus is on texts that continue to be important to the culture they represent, such as The Tale of Genji, Journey to the West, The Thousand and One Nights, The Divine Comedy, and Shakuntala.
Examines contemporary literatures across the world in order to explore both the similarities and differences in literary styles and themes. Because so much current non-Western literature is influenced by Western literature, culture, and values, students will consider historical background, including colonial, post-colonial, or political readings of writers such as Chinua Achebe, Gabriel Gárcia Márquez, Nadine Gordimer, Lu Xün, and Jamaica Kincaid.
Considers contemporary writings from women around the world. Students analyze these literary texts, examine the cultures they represent, and keep apprised of current events related to women. Prerequisite: HUMA 205 Philosophy and Literature, any 100 or 200 level LITR course or equivalent, enrollment in the William Penn Honors Program, or instructor permission.
3 hours. An integrated introductory study of Mandarin Chinese. Listening, speaking, reading and writing are all integral to learning the language. Cultural aspects of China are also presented as essential components. Three class hours per week.
3 hours. An integrated introductory study of Mandarin Chinese. Listening, speaking, reading and writing are all integral to learning the language. Cultural aspects of China are also presented as essential components. At the end of MAND 102, students should have novice high proficiency as defined by the American Council of the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Three class hours per week.
An introductory thematic study of the roles of music in a variety of world cultures, with emphasis on listening to, viewing, and understanding a broad selection of musical styles mostly outside the Western classical tradition.
This course will cover the nature of culture and its applications to understanding human functioning. Students will examine their own and other cultures, as well as cultural influence on their thought, behavior, and relationships. Prerequisite: PSYC 150 General Psychology.
A comparative study between Christianity and other prominent religions of the world, such as Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism, and contemporary kinds of alternative religion. (Identical to INTL 440.)
A comparative study of world societies and their ways of life.
A study of the historical and socioeconomic factors experienced and lived by people of differing racial and ethnic backgrounds in the United States. Specific attention is placed on the social construction of race, social attitudes and past and present racial issues. Prerequisite: SOCI 150 Principles of Sociology or instructor's permission.
An integrated introductory study of Spanish. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are all integral to learning the language. Cultural aspects of Spain and Latin America are also presented as essential components. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: placement exam required.
An integrated introductory study of Spanish. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are all integral to learning the language. Cultural aspects of Spain and Latin America are also presented as essential components. At the end of SPAN 102, students should have novice high proficiency as defined by the American Council of the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 101 Introductory Spanish I or placement by exam.
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 Introductory Spanish II or placement by exam.
A proficiency-centered approach to the study of Spanish, with extensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. At the end of SPAN 202, students should have intermediate mid proficiency as defined by ACTFL. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I or placement by exam.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II or placement by exam.
A thorough review of Spanish to develop intermediate high proficiency, as defined by ACTFL. Activities include reading authentic texts, writing in a variety of styles, and developing strategies for communication. Three class sessions and one laboratory per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 301 Intermediate/Advanced Spanish I or placement by exam.
An intensive introduction to Spanish medical vocabulary, focusing on listening and speaking skills likely to be used in a clinical setting, and on the cultural practices of Hispanic populations in the United States. Prerequisite: One year of Spanish study prior to college, minimum score of 100 on Spanish placement exam, or SPAN 101.
This course examines the Latino populations of the U.S. and develops academic Spanish for those who learned Spanish outside of a formal school setting. Taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Placement by testing or instructor permission.
Notes:
  • LITR 236,237,238 may be taken for Humanities credit or Intercultural credit, but one course cannot be counted for both requirements.
  • Students who take GEED 365 Cross-Cultural Experience - International (2) must also complete the second part of the course GEED 465 (1), offered the May term after GEED 365. 
 

Alternative option:

Students may choose to design their own intercultural experience. For example, a student may participate in a short-term cultural immersion trip or a longer-term interaction in a local, but culturally-different community. If the intercultural experience does not have academic credit attached to it, it must be approved in advance by the Center for Study Abroad no later than the first week of the student’s senior year, and must be completed by the time of graduation. Past experiences are not eligible options to meet this requirement. Please contact the Center for Study Abroad for specific requirements to be eligible for this option, as well as requirements to meet approved intercultural experiences.